Skip to main content

Full text of "Computerworld"

See other formats


THE NEWSWEEKLY FOR THE COMPUTER COMMUNITY 

August 10,1987• Vol. XXI • No. 32 ■ $21 Copy • $44/ Year 

COMPUTERWORID 


INSIDE 

Spotlight — Users 
face up to the task of 
reconciling relational 
and traditional DBMS 
technologies. Pullout 
section. 

In Depth — Plotting 
cost vs. benefits: End 
users get in on the 
act. Page 59. 


Borland challenge to 1-2-3 

scores points with beta-test 
users. Page 4. 

If it looks like a Mac and it 

walks like a Mac, does IBM’s 
latest PS/2 take its cues 
from the Macintosh? Page 8. 

Federal government’s FTS 

2000 net plan runs into con¬ 
gressional snare. Page 2. 

FCC proposes elimination 

of AT&T profit ceilings. Page 
17. 

DEC set to team with 
Odesta for Macintosh-VAX 
link. Page 16. 

Software developers rate 

portability from HP 3000 to 
Spectrum processors. Page 
94. 

Ashton-Tate publishing 

package shuns expensive PC 
options. Page 93. 

Merger rumors race down 
Wall Street as investors gam¬ 
ble on computer industry gy¬ 
rations. Page 71. 

Intel’s aging 8088 still dom¬ 
inates personal computer 
sales. Page 33. 

Cincom’s president re¬ 
signs, citing personal rea¬ 
sons. Page 94. 


Canaan’s 
vanishing 
act vexes 

BY STANLEY GIBSON 

CW STAFF 


Worried because he had not 
heard from his hardware suppli¬ 
er in more than six weeks, Tony 
Bye, the Great Britain distribu¬ 
tor for Canaan Computer Corp., 
flew to the firm’s Trumbull, 
Conn., headquarters several 
weeks ago. He found Canaan’s 
factory locked shut, with a sign 
on the door saying the computer 
maker was no longer in business. 

The experience was a rude 
awakening for Bye, who had re¬ 
ceived no formal notice from Ca¬ 
naan management that the com¬ 
pany was going out of business. 
“We just heard by word of 
mouth,” said Bye, who is manag¬ 
ing director of Databench Ltd. in 
Marlow, England. 

He later discussed the situa¬ 
tion with Canaan distributors in 
West Germany, France and Bel¬ 
gium and found they were all 
likewise in the dark. 

Where’d everybody go? 

Canaan, which was founded in 
1981 and has received some $30 
million in venture capital, slipped 
almost out of existence in recent 
months, apparently without tell¬ 
ing many of its OEMs or custom¬ 
ers. Several said they are con¬ 
fused and angry over what they 
called the silent disappearance of 
the minicomputer maker. 

Canaan’s investors, led by 
Hambrecht & Quist, Inc., have 
been scrambling to pay off debts 
and now say they are in the pro¬ 
cess of belatedly notifying cus¬ 
tomers. 

IBM’s announcement of its 
9370 departmental processor, 
which competed directly with 
Canaan’s VM-based minicom¬ 
puter, sapped Canaan’s market 
appeal as a departmental proces¬ 
sor. 

Continued on page 4 



9370 hits the ground running 

Large-volume shipments should push IBM mini past sales target 


BY JAMES CONNOLLY 

CW STAFF 


IBM’s goal of selling 5,000 of its 
9370 mid-range systems by 
year’s end appears within reach 
as the minicomputers gain a 
foothold as distributed proces¬ 
sors in major corporations, ac¬ 
cording to several IBM observ¬ 
ers. 

Analysts tracking early 9370 
shipments and users’ buying in¬ 
tentions reported last week that 
IBM’s projection for the last six 
months of this year is realistic 
and predicted that IBM will sell 
15,000 to 30,000 of the mini¬ 
computers during each of the 
next few years. Only a few of the 
early shipments have been re¬ 
placements for IBM 4361 or 
4331 systems, with the balance 
being used in pilot programs for 
major 9370-based MIS applica¬ 
tions. 

In addition, one analyst said, 
IBM will soon release several 
major corporations from nondis¬ 
closure agreements as it an¬ 
nounces a half-dozen or more or¬ 
ders, each for 300 to 400 9370s. 

That analyst, Kimball Brown 


of San Jose, Calif., research firm 
Dataquest, Inc., added that key 
9370 accounts are being handled 
by IBM’s Federal Systems Divi¬ 
sion. 

“The wraps are going to 
come off in August,” Brown said, 

DEC again 
rewrites 
price tags 

BY DAVID BRIGHT 

CW STAFF 


MAYNARD, Mass. — Digital 
Equipment Corp. restructured 
its pricing last week for the sec¬ 
ond time in five months, raising 
the prices of high-end VAX 8000 
systems while cutting the costs 
of smaller models. 

Analysts said the move sets 
the stage for next month’s 
scheduled introduction of the 
Microvax III system. 


noting that IBM is expected to 
free customers such as Ford Mo¬ 
tor Co. and United Airlines from 
two-year nondisclosure agree¬ 
ments. 

“What is going to happen is 
Continued on page 6 


DEC also reduced the prices 
of its older PDP-11 line by an un¬ 
specified amount, dropped the 
price of the Microvax 2000 
workstation by 17% to 20% and 
increased the price of “the bal¬ 
ance” of its hardware and soft¬ 
ware products by less than 5%, 
according to a statement. DEC 
did not answer requests to speci¬ 
fy the products affected. 

Although DEC has lately been 
making low-end prices more at¬ 
tractive, the company has simul¬ 
taneously increased high-end 
prices. Analysts suggested that 
this latest restructuring could be 
a response to the recent start of 
9370 system shipments by IBM. 

At the same time, DEC an¬ 
nounced lower cost memory 
modules for the VAX 8000 sys¬ 
tems that use lM-bit chips to in- 
Continued on page 93 


Fortune 500 slowly warming to PS/2 


BY ED SCANNELL 
and ALANJ. RYAN 

CW STAFF 


IBM’s Personal System/2 series 
has made inroads into Fortune 
500 companies, but concerns 
over its unproven technology 
and the lack of an advanced oper¬ 
ating system are stalling some 
purchasing plans, according to 
MIS managers at more than a 
dozen Fortune 500 companies 
who were interviewed last week. 

Managers also said the ma¬ 
chines are not causing them to 
scale back plans to buy IBM Per¬ 
sonal Computer-compatible sys¬ 
tems. 

The interviews indicated that 
firms that have placed significant 
orders are, for the most part, air¬ 
lines and insurance companies 
that plan to resell PS/2s — espe¬ 
cially Model 30s — to affiliated 
organizations. Other Fortune 
500 companies said they are hes¬ 
itant and plan to purchase be¬ 
tween 50 and 200 systems dur¬ 
ing the remainder of this year as 


well as a sizable quantity of com¬ 
patibles. 

“We’re committed to [the 
PS/2] as a product, as opposed to 
ordering IBM PC ATs,” said 
Daniel Cavanagh, senior vice- 


president of MIS at Metropoli¬ 
tan Life Insurance Co. in New 
York. He added, “That doesn’t 
mean we would stop buying plug- 
compatible equipment” as PS/2 
clones become available. 

Continued on page 8 


The shift is on 

Surveys of IBM mainframe sites in U.S. indicate increasing 
demand for PS/2* 



INFORMATION PROVIDED BY FOCUS RESEARCH, INC. 

CW CHART: MITCHELL J. HAYES 























































































IN THIS 
ISSUE 


NEWS 


Building bridges. “It’s a mainframe-class product on a micro," 
one insider says about Unisys’s Ally, a 4GL based on reusable code 
aimed at the Unix and MS-DOS worlds. The initial release will sup¬ 
port Oracle’s relational DBMS and Dbase III. Page 10. 

Brushup. ADR upgrades Datacom/DB, its relational-like DBMS, 
to take advantage of MVS/XA, reduce CPU utilization time and trim 
response time. Page 93. 


NEWS 

4 Borland spreadsheet to 
go head-to-head with Lotus’s 
1-2-3. 

6 IBM cuts prices of 3090 
Models 300E, 600E. 

6 Unisys President Stem 
resigns. 

6 Intel charges Hyundai 
with EPROM patent infringe¬ 
ment. 

7 Fortran 8X opponents 
agree that the language is too 
large. 

8 PS/2 line beefed up with 
high-end Model 80, 8086- 
based Model 25. 

8 IBM designs PS/2 Model 
25 to play off Mac’s 
strengths. 

1 2 Leading Edge an¬ 
nounces PC AT compatible. 

1 2 NCR ends eight-year 
battle, pays $6M in user suit. 

1 3 Cleveland start-up in¬ 
troduces add-in board for 
PS/2s. 

1 3 Microsoft’s Chart 
aimed at PC business, science 
applications. 

16 DEC, Odesta join to de¬ 
velop data base for Mac, VAX 
computers. 

1 7 FCC favors lifting prof¬ 
it ceilings, imposing price 
caps for AT&T. 

1 7 Bankamerica chooses 
AI to assist lending process. 

18 Tandy unveils PCs for 
spectrum of performance 
needs. 

93 Ashton-Tate offers oc¬ 
casional users low-priced 
desktop package. 

94 Two utility suppliers 
convert wares to run on HP 
processors. 

SOFTWARE & 
SERVICES 

25 Ohio hospital adapts to 
changing information center 
role. 

25 Canadian underdog’s 
job scheduler threatens Com¬ 
puter Associates product. 

25 Software AG session 
manager displays 10 screens. 



Sweden’s S.E. Banken bets 
on MIS. Page 63. 


MICROCOMPUTING 

33 Chips and Technol¬ 
ogies revamps AT chip set as 
match for PS/2. 

33 Motorola marketing 
managers chip away at 
80386. 

33 Intel 8088 PC manu¬ 
facturers continue to report 
brisk sales. 


NETWORKING 

41 Banks move to EDI 
services. 

41 Sears cashes in with 
SNA. 

41 Gateway opens up 
products to support Ad¬ 
vanced Netware. 


SYSTEMS & 
PERIPHERALS 

51 DEC preps Microvax 
III. 

51 NCR offers mainte¬ 
nance on System/36s. 

51 McDonnell Douglas 
adds six systems to Pick- 
based line. 

51 Pacific Gas & Elec¬ 
tric’s MIS weathers climate 
shift. 

51 Locom designs memo¬ 
ry cards for IBM 4381s. 


Quotable 

I t was a very pow¬ 
erful and effec¬ 
tive machine. The 
whole thing’s a trage¬ 
dy.” 

TONYBYE 
DATABENCH LTD. 

On Canaan's demise. 

See story page 1. 


MANAGEMENT 

63 Guide president de¬ 
fines group’s focus. 

63 Swedish bank wields 
DP for profit. 


COMPUTER 

INDUSTRY 

71 New blood pumps 
TRW’s Customer Service Di¬ 
vision. 

71 Industry battles Cus¬ 
toms Service parts tariff. 

71 Intellicorp seeks con¬ 
ventional hardware markets. 


EMPLOYMENT 

TODAY 

77 Vendors seek technol¬ 
ogy know-how for marketing 
positions. 

SPOTLIGHT 

Relational DBMSs are com¬ 
ing on strong, but their posi¬ 
tion right now is as an ad¬ 
junct to existing systems. 

Pullout section. 


IN DEPTH 

59 End users put a dollar 
value on the risk of a new sys¬ 
tem. By Howard Miller. 

OPINION & 
ANALYSIS 

23 Withington gives cold 
shoulder to integration. 

25 Betts profits from Pen¬ 
tagon research. 

33 Zachmann gives Prime 
thumbs-up. 

41 Fleig supports LAN 
vendor linkups. 

51 Connolly investigates 
the upper mid-range. 

63 Ludlum learns manage¬ 
ment lesson from the Iran 
scandal. 

71 Wilder separates fact 
from fiction. 

DEPARTMENTS 

22 Editorial 

64 Book Review 
66 Calendar 

87 Buy Sell Swap 
94 Inside Lines 


Congressman, 6SA spar 
over federal net plan 


BY MITCH BETTS 

CW STAFF 


WASHINGTON, D.C. — The 
federal government’s effort to 
acquire an upgraded private net¬ 
work called Federal Telecom¬ 
munications System (FTS) 2000 
was thrown into turmoil last 
week. A key member of Con¬ 
gress challenged the govern¬ 
ment’s entire approach to the 
$4.5 billion procurement just a 
few weeks before bids are due on 
Aug. 31. 

Rep. Jack Brooks (D-Texas) 
urged the General Services Ad¬ 
ministration (GSA) to complete¬ 
ly restructure the contract so 
that it can be awarded to multi¬ 
ple vendors rather than follow 
the winner-take-all approach of 
the current procurement. 

GSA Administrator Terence 
C. Golden rejected Brooks’ sug¬ 
gestion, a spokesman said, and 
the GSA is proceeding on its 
original path. The agency is said 
to believe that a single-vendor 
network would be cheaper, be¬ 
cause of volume discounts, and 
easier to manage. 

In response to Brooks’ criti¬ 
cism, GSA officials emphasized 
that the 10-year contract can be 
terminated and opened for a new 
round of competitive bidding af¬ 
ter four years if any problems de¬ 
velop. 

Explosive action 

Brooks, the tenacious chairman 
of the House Committee on Gov¬ 
ernment Operations, could still 
torpedo the GSA's FTS 2000 
strategy through oversight 
hearings and legislation. 

“If Brooks beats them about 
the head and shoulders and pre¬ 
vails ... then that would be a to¬ 
tal abort,” said Whit Dodson, re¬ 
search director for International 
Data Corp.’s Washington Divi¬ 
sion. Dodson explained that the 
multivendor approach would be 
such a major change that the 
GSA would have to terminate 
the current FTS 2000 procure¬ 
ment and start over. 

The GSA wants to replace its 
outdated intercity network for 
federal agencies — the largest 


private network in the world — 
with an integrated voice and 
high-speed data network called 
FTS 2000. 

Brooks, concerned that the 
government will be locked into a 
single contractor for the 10-year 
life of the contract, wants it to be 
split on a 70%-30% basis be¬ 
tween two vendors and rebid ev¬ 
ery three years to determine 
which vendor gets the bigger 
share. 

But Martin Marietta Corp. 
threatened to pull out of the bid¬ 
ding if the procurement is 
changed to meet Brooks’ de¬ 
mands. Martin Marietta is bid¬ 
ding for the contract as leader of 
a team that includes MCI Com¬ 
munications Corp. Martin Mari¬ 
etta opposes changes that break 
the contract into pieces, a 
spokesman said. 

AT&T, the only other bidder, 
does not oppose the Brooks pro¬ 
posal. An AT&T spokeswoman 
said the carrier is preparing its 
bid for the current procurement 
but considers Brooks’ multiven¬ 
dor approach an acceptable one. 

The FTS 2000 procurement 
has also run into several other 
problems in the last few weeks: 

• AT&T charged in federal court 
that the regional Bell holding 
companies have promised to pro¬ 
vide the Martin Marietta team 
with interexchange services that 
are prohibited by the court order 
on AT&T divestiture. The Bell 
companies denied the accusa¬ 
tion, calling it an AT&T ploy to 
knock out a competitor. 

• The GSA contract officer for 
FTS 2000 was recently re¬ 
placed, sources said, because of a 
possible conflict of interest. 

• The Federal Communications 
Commission turned down a GSA 
request that the FTS 2000 carri¬ 
ers be exempt from common- 
carrier rate regulation. But the 
GSA, which wants a fixed-price 
contract, said it was satisfied 
that the ruling will allow the car¬ 
riers to file fixed-price tariffs. 

• The U.S. General Accounting 
Office reported that the GSA’s 
initial decisions concerning FTS 
2000 were made without ade¬ 
quate analysis. 


CORRECTIONS 

Computer Solutions, Inc. was in¬ 
advertently omitted from the 
Spotlight MRP II software chart 
[CW, July 6]. Its product, 
Growthpower, contains 16 mod¬ 
ules such as financial, manufac¬ 
turing (including manufacturing 
resource planning) and market¬ 
ing. It runs on the Hewlett-Pack¬ 
ard Co. 3000 series, includes 
real-time updating for all trans¬ 
actions and an integrated ac¬ 
counting/financial system. A 


typical system sells for between 
$40,000 and $75,000. The com¬ 
pany’s phone number is (617) 
229-2200. 

Data 3 Systems, Inc.’s MRPS 
38-S and MRPS 38-P MRP soft¬ 
ware are based on both net and 
regeneration logic and offer rela¬ 
tional data base features. The 
MRPS 38-S has 260 U.S. site li¬ 
censes; the MRPS 38-P has 10 
[CW.July 6]. 


2 


COMPUTERWORLD 


AUGUST 10,1987 

















































"Thanks to ADR/eMail 
the eastern hemisphere 


knows what the western 
hemisphere is doing.” 


Ron Olive, O.P., Information Resources 
American President Companies, Ltd. 







I 




taying ahead of the competition today 
takes a company with quick reflexes. 
And the best way to improve your 
company’s reflexes is to improve its com¬ 
munications. 

That’s why hundreds of companies 
like American President Companies, Ltd., 
The Country Companies and Emery 
Chemicals use ADR/eMAIL* 

American President relies on ADR/ 
eMAIL to keep its customer’s shipments 
on schedule. ADR/eMAlL exchanges vital 


information between 4,000 employees at 
more than 100 locations throughout North 
America and Asia. 

Communicating with ADR/eMAIL 
is better than by telephone or telex. ADR/ 
eMAIL makes sure urgent messages get 
priority treatment by organizing them in 
priority order. And by letting people pre¬ 
view their messages before they read them 

ADR/eMAIL is also easy to use. 
Because ADR/eMAIL understands every¬ 
day business language. No matter what 


language you conduct business in. 

And ADR/eMAIL is easy to install 
and maintain. Most companies already 
have everything ADR/eMAIL needs —an 
IBM mainframe, CRTs, 328x printers, PCs 
and TP networks. 

To find out how easy it is to give your 
company this world-class electronic mail 
system call 1-800-ADR-WARE. 

ADR PERFORMANCE SOFTWARE. 
Onlock the potential. 




Applied Data Research. Inc. Orchard Road & Rt 206, CN-8, Princeton, NJ 08540 1-201-874-9000. 


C 1987 ADR 











NEWS 


Borland set to challenge 1-2-3 

Users impatient for Lotus upgrade say Silicon spreadsheet a contender 


BY STEPHENJONES 

CW STAFF 


SCOTTS VALLEY, Calif. — 
Borland International President 
Philippe Kahn is expected to an¬ 
nounce today that Borland is de¬ 
veloping a spreadsheet that will 
go head-to-head with the vener¬ 
able Lotus Development Corp. 

1- 2-3 in the corporate decision¬ 
making software market, 
sources close to the company 
said last week. 

The product, which has been 
beta-tested at sites such as Price 
Waterhouse and GTE Corp. for 
the last three weeks, offers a soft 
interface that can be customized 
by the user. 

It can also read and write files 
from 1-2-3, Microsoft Corp.’s 
Multiplan and Computer Asso¬ 
ciates International, Inc.’s Su¬ 
percalc. While Borland has em¬ 
phasized that the software is still 
being developed, sources said 
the company has guaranteed de¬ 
livery by year’s end. 

Expected to be priced be¬ 
tween $200 and $300, early ver¬ 
sions of the offering have scored 
points with some users who until 
now have relied primarily on 1- 

2- 3. Version 2.01 of 1-2-3 is cur¬ 


rently listed at $495. 

“I’m very impressed with it; 
it’s more intuitive than 1-2-3, 
but it’s similar enough to feel like 
you’re running a Lotus pro¬ 
gram,” said Don Smith, a part¬ 
ner with Price Waterhouse in 
Chicago who acts as the firm’s 
coordinator of microcomputer 
consulting. 

Grab market share 

If the product takes off, it could 
help Borland grab a chunk of Lo¬ 
tus’s share in the market for mi¬ 
crocomputer business decision¬ 
making tools. 

That fits in with the philoso¬ 
phy of the expansion-minded 
Kahn, who last month guaran¬ 
teed Borland a foothold in the 
data base management business 
by gobbling up Paradox publish¬ 
er Ansa Software. 

Sources, who asked not to be 
identified, said months of specu¬ 
lation about the Borland spread¬ 
sheet will end today when Kahn 
releases a formal statement 
about the product. Kahn could 
not be reached for comment. 

Known as Silicon, the spread¬ 
sheet’s strongest point might be 
the graphics and charting capa¬ 
bilities it produces using IBM’s 


Enhanced Graphics Adapter. 
Features include three-dimen¬ 
sional images and exploding pie 
charts. One user reported the 
ability to change fonts and make 
slick-looking charts without the 
bother of going into a graph 
package. 

‘Beats Lotus hands-down’ 

One tester, who has been using 
1-2-3 for the last four years, said 
Silicon’s sharp graphics features 
“beats Lotus hands-down.” 

He added that the program 
has about 500 pages of detailed 
documentation that is easier to 
read than earlier product man¬ 
uals from Borland such as Reflex. 

The product also recalculates 
spreadsheet updates faster than 
1-2-3 because it picks out only 
those numbers that have been 
changed and ignores the rest 
during recalculations, testers 
said. 

Integrated graphics, mean¬ 
while, are reported to accommo¬ 
date the Paradox and Reflex data 
bases. 

Silicon’s high functionality 
could fill a void for users who 
have grown impatient waiting 
for long-rumored enhancements 
of 1-2-3 Release 2.0. 


Vanishing act 

FROM PAGE 1 

Several rounds of layoffs led 
to a restructuring period in May 
in which two Hambrecht & Quist 
officials, Michael Preletz and Jer¬ 
ry Burk, took over the reins of 
the company. 

All employees dismissed 

About eight weeks ago, virtually 
all remaining employees were 
dismissed, and on July 6, an evic¬ 
tion order was executed on be¬ 
half of Canaan’s landlord, accord¬ 
ing to the records of the Superior 
Court in Bridgeport, Conn. Sub¬ 
sequently, some 300 to 400 
computers plus peripherals were 
moved to a Bridgeport ware¬ 
house, according to an employee 
of the storage company. Two 
weeks ago, Hambrecht & Quist 
put Richard Rifenburgh of the 
firm’s Boston office in charge of 
what remained of Canaan. 

Rifenburgh has since relin¬ 
quished control of the company’s 
assets to Accent Systems Corp. 
in Pittsburgh. In an agreement 
currently being finalized, Accent 
will service the installed base of 
Canaan systems and perhaps sell 
systems from inventory in the 
hope of paying off Canaan’s cred¬ 
itors, according to Rifenburgh, 
who is currently chairman of Ca¬ 
naan. Scott Os, an Accent execu¬ 
tive, is serving as president. 

Now, .Canaan has arranged 
with its landlord to regain pos¬ 


session of its machines and is in 
the process of shipping them to 
Accent, according to Rifen¬ 
burgh. As of last week, Bye said, 
he had still not been informed of 
Canaan’s condition. 

“We’re now faced with the 
challenge of maintaining them 
[Canaan computers],” he said, 
indicating that he has been at¬ 
tempting to obtain old Canaan 
machines to support his user 
base of five customers. Data- 
bench had sold the system with a 
project management software 
package. “They run very well. It 
was a very powerful and effec¬ 
tive machine. The whole thing’s 
a tragedy,” Bye said. 

Left in the dark 

Other users and distributors 
echoed Bye’s account of having 
been left in the dark by Canaan, 
Hambrecht & Quist and Accent 
Systems. 

“It boggles my mind. The big 
disappointment was that we 
would have expected Canaan to 
notify the installed base. I didn’t 
hear from Accent, either,” said 
Spike Kasper, president of Nor¬ 
walk, Conn.-based Document 
Systems, Inc., which is leasing a 
Canaan DCS 6100 system and 
using it for development. Kasper 
said he has contacted Accent 
personnel on his own and that he 
has attempted, without success, 
to speak with Hambrecht & 
Quist personnel. 

Kasper said he had hoped that 
Canaan would eventually market 


his firm’s product, a mainframe- 
based document text storage 
and retrieval system. Document 
Systems will now develop solely 
for IBM’s 9370, he said. Kasper 
expressed surprise and disap¬ 
pointment at Canaan’s fate. 
“Their system did what it said it 
would do. I can’t figure out why 
they weren’t able to capitalize on 
the 9370 market,” he said. 

“They were remiss, not noti¬ 
fying us,” said another user, who 
asked not to be named. “We 
have had no information from 
Canaan or Accent. We heard 
about it through the grapevine.” 
The user, who has been running 
two Canaan processors for about 
one year, added, “We kind of like 
the system.” 

Rifenburgh told Computer- 
world that he is in the process of 
informing Canaan customers “as 
fast as humanly possible.” 

“Customers have every right 
to be unhappy,” Rifenburgh said. 
Formerly treasurer and a ven¬ 
ture investor in Accent Systems, 
Rifenburgh joined Hambrecht & 
Quist eight weeks ago. 

Accent was created in No¬ 
vember 1985 to service the 
workstations of Perq Systems 
Corp., a company that had just 
ceased operations. Since then, 
Accent has been paying off Perq 
creditors with maintenance rev¬ 
enue — much in the manner in 
which the company plans to pay 
off Canaan’s bills. 

Ron Ritchie, who was presi¬ 
dent of Canaan for more than a 


“As we add additonal spread¬ 
sheets and wait for Lotus’s en¬ 
hancements, we’ll strongly con¬ 
sider the Borland product,” 
Smith said. “The added graphics 
capabilities are something we al¬ 
ways wanted and will certainly 
use.” 

Why another one? 

But some industry watchers are 
less enthused about the pending 
product, with one microcomput¬ 
er dealer from the Midwest ask¬ 
ing: “Why does the world need 
another spreadsheet? All of cor¬ 
porate America is trained on 1-2- 
3.” 

And others questioned 
whether Borland could win in a 
David vs. Goliath battle with Lo¬ 
tus. "Frankly, I think Borland 
could be spending its money bet¬ 
ter,” said Bruce Johnston, a se¬ 
nior analyst with First Boston 
Corp. in New York. “It seems 
that Philippe is intent on taking 
on the big boys, and that’s going 
to be tough.” 

Despite its early inroads into 
Microsoft’s share of the lan¬ 
guages market, Johnston said 
Borland would be better off tar¬ 
geting niches in the microcom¬ 
puter software business in which 
the likes of Lotus and Microsoft 
are not to be found. Selling low- 
cost programs into such niches 
helped the $280 million compa¬ 
ny gain initial success as a start¬ 
up in 1983. 


year, until May, attributed Ca¬ 
naan’s demise to IBM’s 9370 de¬ 
partmental computer. Canaan 
would have brought its product 
to market in time to fill a need for 
IBM 370-type mid-range pro¬ 
cessors, he said,“if IBM had not 
preannounced the 9370.” 

Ritchie agreed with the no¬ 
tion that IBM “validates” a mar¬ 
ket by announcing products for 
it, but he added that the market 
is only fertile for competitors af¬ 
ter IBM ships products — not 
before. He pointed to the IBM 
Personal Computer clone mar¬ 
ket as an example. 

Overly optimistic 

Another employee said Canaan 
lost 18 firm orders on the day the 
9370 was announced. He added 
that Canaan made the mistake of 
building processors based on 
overly optimistic sales projec¬ 
tions. When orders were can¬ 
celed, Canaan was left with the 
processors in inventory. 

Another former Canaan em¬ 
ployee said Canaan had installed 
30 to 40 systems in the U.S. 
“Between the revenue from sys¬ 
tems and maintenance, I believe 
they could still cover all the 
debt,” he said. 

The company had reportedly 
received more than $30 million 
in venture capital investment 
from Hambrecht & Quist and 
other investors, including Gen¬ 
eral Electric Venture Capital 
Group and Alan Patricof Asso¬ 
ciates. 


COMPUTtRWORLD 


Editor in Chief 

Bill Laberis 

Executive Editor 

Paul Gillin 


News Editor 

Peter Bartolik 
Senior Editors 

James Connolly, Systems 
Clinton Wilder, Industry 
Elisabeth Horwitt, Networking 
Charles Babcock, Software 
David Ludlum, Management 
Douglas Barney, Microcomputing 
Patricia Keefe, Networking 
Ed Scannell, Microcomputing 
Senior Writers 

Rosemary Hamilton, Stanley Gibson 
David Bright, Ninamary Buba Maginnis 

Staff Writer 

Alan J. Ryan 

New Products Editor 

Suzanne Weixel 

Intern 

Adam Stone 

Features Editor 

George Harrar 

Senior Editors 

Janet Fiderio 
Glenn Rifkin 
Joanne Kelleher 
Amy Sommerfeld Fiore 

Associate Editors 

Deborah Fielding, Penny Janzen 

Assistant Editor 

Kelly Shea 

Senior Writer 

Michael L. Sullivan-Trainor 

Researcher 

Sally Cusack 

Assistant Researcher 

Bonnie MacKeil 

Managing Editor 

Donovan White 

Chief Copy Editor 

Patricia Heal Erickson 

Assistant Chief Copy Editor 

Steven M. Ulfelder 

Copy Editors 

David W. Bromley, Mary Grover 
Martha E. Ruch, Sharon Baker 
Laura O’Connell, Marie T. Burke 
James Daly 

Design Editor 

Marjorie Magowan 

Graphics Editor 

Mitchell J. Hayes 

Graphics Assistant 

Amy J. Swanson 

Graphic Designer 

P. Charles Ladouceur 

Editorial Assistants 

Patricia Faherty, Christie Sears 
Linda Gorgone 

Rights and Permissions Manager 

Nancy Shannon 

News Bureaus 
Mid-Atlantic 

201/967-1350 
Alan Alper, Correspondent 
Washington, D.C. 
202/347-6718 
Mitch Betts, Correspondent 
West Coast 
415/328-8064 
Kathy Chin Leong, Manager 
Jeffry Beeler, Chief 
Julie Pitta, Senior Correspondent 
James A. Martin, Correspondent 
Stephen Jones, Correspondent 
Midwest 
312/827-4433 

Jean S. Bozman, Correspondent 

IDG News Service 

Kathleen A. Gow, Director 

Main Editorial Office 

Box 9171, 375 Cochituate Road 
Framingham, MA 01701-9171 
617/879-0700 

Computenvorld is a publication of IDG Communica¬ 
tions. the world's largest publisher of computer-re¬ 
lated information. IDG Communications publishes 
over 80 computer publications in more than 28 ma¬ 
jor countries. Fourteen million people read one or 
more IDG Communications publications each month. 
IDG Communications publications contribute to the 
IDG News Service offering the latest on domestic 
and international computer news. IDG Communica¬ 
tions publications include: ARGENTINA'S Compu¬ 
terworld Argentina. PC Mundo; ASIA'S Communi¬ 
cations World, Computerworld Hong Kong, 
Computenvorld Indonesia, Computenvorld Malay¬ 
sia, Computenvorld Singapore, Computerworld 
Southeast Asia. PC Renew; AUSTRALIA'S Compu¬ 
terworld Australia. Communications World. Austra¬ 
lian PC World. Australian Macworld; AUSTRIA’S 
Computerwelt Oesterreich; BRAZIL'S DataNews, 
PC Mundo. Micro Mundo; CHILE'S Informatica, 
Computacion Personal; DENMARK’S Computer- 
world Danmark, PC World Danmark; FINLAND'S 
Mikro. Tietoviikko; FRANCE'S Le Monde Informa- 
tique, Distributique. InfoPC, Le Monde Des Tele¬ 
coms; GREECE'S Micro and Computer Age; HUN¬ 
GARY'S Computenvorld SZT. Mikrovdag; INDIA’S 
Dataquest; ISRAEL'S People & Computers Weekly, 
People & Computers Biweekly; ITALY'S Computer- 
world Italia; JAPAN'S Computerworld Japan; MEXI¬ 
CO'S Computenvorld Mexico; THE NETHER¬ 
LANDS' Computerworld Netherlands. PC World 
Benelux; NEW ZEALAND’S Computerworld New 
Zealand; NORWAY'S Computerworld Norge, PC 
World Norge; PEOPLE'S REPUBLIC OF CHINA'S 
China Computenvorld. China Computenvorld 
Monthly; SAUDI ARABIA'S Arabian Computer 
News; SOUTH KOREA’S Computerworld Korea, 
PC World Korea: SPAIN’S Computerworld Espana, 
Commodore World, PC World Espana, Communica- 
ciones World. Informatica Industna; SWEDEN'S 
ComputerSweden. Mikrodatom. Svenska PC World; 
SWITZERLAND'S Computerworld Schweiz: UNIT¬ 
ED KINGDOM'S Computer News. DEC Today. ICL 
Today, PC Business World; UNITED STATE’S 
Amiga World. Boston ComputerNews, CD-ROM Re¬ 
new. Computerworld, Computers In Science. Digi¬ 
tal News, Federal Computer Week, 80 Micro, FO¬ 
CUS Publications. InCider. Infoworld. Macworld. 
Computer + Software News (Micro Marketworld/ 
Lebhar-Fnedman). Network World. PC World. Por¬ 
table Computer Review, Publish! PC Resource. Run; 
VENEZUELA'S Computerworld Venezuela; WEST 
GERMANY'S Computerwoche. PC Welt, Run. In¬ 
formation Management. PC Woe he. 


4 


COMPUTERWORLD 


AUGUST 10,1987 























OUR CUSTOMERS RESERVE 
A VERY SPECIAL PLACE FOR 
OUR SORTS. 


■ 


In a recent Data pro survey our customers put 
us on something of a pedestal. 

They rated our sorts—SyncSort OS, DOS and 
CMS—in nine categories, including Reliability, 
Efficiency, Vendor Support, and Ease of Installation 
and Use. 

We’re proud to announce that out of a perfect 
score of 10, our Overall Satisfaction rating was 9.24. 

And just listen to the customers themselves: 

“I wish all systems worked as well.” “We can just 
install it and forget about it.” “The only problem we 
experience is with our users who don’t take full 
advantage of all the features.” 

If you’d like to feel this way about your sort, 
call us to arrange for a test on your system. Our 
number is 201-930-8200. 

To tell the truth, we’re even happier being put 
on systems than on pedestals. 


syncsort 


© 1987 Syncsort Incorporated, 50 Tice Boulevard, Woodcliff Lake, NJ 07675. 









NEWS 


IBM shaves prices on 3090s 

Upgrades on 300E and 600E also cut less than month after first shipment 


BY STANLEY GIBSON 

CW STAFF 


Less than a month after initial 
customer shipments, IBM re¬ 
cently cut prices on its 3090 
Models 300E and 600E and on 
upgrades to those machines. 

The price of a Model 600E 
processor unit was lowered by 
$600,000, from $10,944,000 to 
$10,344,000, and the price of a 
Model 300E processor unit was 
cut by $150,000, from 
$5,750,000 to $5,600,000. Up¬ 
grades to 600E and 300E ma¬ 
chines were cut by up to 20%. 

The first customer shipments 
of the 3090 E models were an¬ 
nounced July 1. To be eligible for 


the price cut, machines must 
have a date of installation or ef¬ 
fective date of purchase on or af¬ 
ter July 28, according to IBM. 

Always count on a cut 

“We’ll take the $600,000 and 
say, ‘Thank you very much,’ ” 
said George DiNardo, executive 
vice-president of Mellon Bank 
NA. Mellon is in the process of 
upgrading a 3090 Model 400 to a 
Model 600E. “Anyone who 
didn’t figure on an August or 
September cut was a candidate 
for the loony bin,” DiNardo said, 
explaining that he always re¬ 
quests a two-month test allow¬ 
ance on new systems or up¬ 
grades in order to be eligible for 


possible price cuts put into effect 
after the initial shipping date. 

Bob Djurdjevic of Annex Re¬ 
search, Inc. said many custom¬ 
ers now include such an on-site 
test allowance clause in their 
contracts, generally for a period 
of 60 days. “IBM wants its sales 
force to focus on these models. 
They think they have a market¬ 
ing advantage over Amdahl and 
NAS,” Djurdjevic said, explain¬ 
ing that the controller IBM uses 
to manage three processors is 
more sophisticated than the two 
controllers Amdahl Corp. and 
National Advanced Systems 
Corp. must use to manage three 
processors in their systems. 

“NAS and Amdahl will have 


to redesign their systems con¬ 
trollers to handle three- and six¬ 
way systems,” he said, adding 
that he has made no adjustment 
to his estimates of residual val¬ 
ues on the processors as a result 
of the price cuts. “The price cuts 
are really cosmetic. It creates a 
talking point for sales reps.” 

IBM’s upgrade price changes 
were lowered as follows: 

• A Model 300E-to-Model 600E 
upgrade was reduced from 
$5,194,000 to $4,744,000. 

• A Model 200-to-Model 300E 
upgrade was reduced from 
$1,755,000 to $1,605,000. 

• A Model 200E-to-Model 300E 
upgrade was reduced from 
$1,605,000 to $1,455,000. 

• A Model 400-to-Model 600E 
upgrade was reduced from 
$3,160,000 to $2,560,000. 

• A Model 400E-to-Model 600E 
upgrade was reduced from 
$3,035,000 to $2,435,000. 


IBM’s 9370 

FROM PAGE 1 

that you are going to see IBM 
getting a lot of government bids 
and big commercial bids through 
the Federal Systems Division. I 
think there are probably a half- 
dozen or so of these Ford-type 
bids that are ready to roll out,” 
Brown said. He explained that 
the Federal Systems Division 
has taken charge of many 9370 
accounts because of that divi¬ 
sion’s charter as a systems inte¬ 
grator. 

Brown contended that the 
large scale and lengthy term of 
the division’s contracts re- __ 
quire IBM to provide prod¬ 
ucts, including the 
networking and software 
tools that the 9370’s crit¬ 
ics have said it lacks, first 
to the Federal Systems Di¬ 
vision and later to the di¬ 
rect sales force. 

Brown said only about 
500 of the 5,000 ship¬ 
ments for this year are re¬ 
placements for 4361-type 
systems. 

Meanwhile, George 
Weiss, an analyst with the 
Gartner Group, Inc. re¬ 
search firm in Stamford, 
Conn., concurred that the 
early shipments are reach¬ 
ing “primarily very large 
enterprises with the po¬ 
tential for large volumes. ” 

Weiss said the typical 
buyer has been a large company 
that is decentralizing its main¬ 
frame operations and is current¬ 
ly using a 9370 with plans to buy 
many more if the system meets 
its needs. 

Weiss said the Gartner Group 
expects IBM to ship 20,000 to 
25,000 9370s per year begin¬ 
ning in 1988 or 1989. He noted 
that many potential 9370 users, 
including those with office auto¬ 
mation needs and IBM 
DOS/VSE users, remain uncom¬ 
mitted to the 9370 pending 


IBM’s introduction of a system 
code-named Silverlake, which 
was designed as a successor to 
the System/36 and 38. 

“I still think there are some 
intra-IBM factors that make the 
9370 not a done deal except in 
those decentralized applications 
I was talking about,” Weiss said. 

He said the applications in¬ 
volved tend to run under VM and 
that the 4300 line’s traditional 
DOS/VSE user base has yet to 
be a major factor in 9370 sales. 

Forrester Research, Inc., a 
Cambridge, Mass.-based market 
research group, estimated that 
annual 9370 shipments will hit 
the 23,710 mark by 1991, and 


can do the job,” McCarthy not¬ 
ed. He added that a Profs succes¬ 
sor being written under IBM’s 
Systems Application Architec¬ 
ture may address the current 
product’s shortcomings. 

McCarthy also said many 
9370s will be sold as replace¬ 
ments for the IBM 8100 distrib¬ 
uted processor when a migration 
aid is available and that the re¬ 
lease of IBM’s MVS/IS in 1990 
will make it easier to distribute 
mainframe applications on the 
9370. 

In a recent survey of 26 For¬ 
tune 1,000 corporations, For¬ 
rester found that slightly more 
than half have no plans to order a 


Mini revival 

Shipment projections for leading vendors show rapid acceptance 
of IBM's 9370 



INFORMATION PROVIDED BY FORRESTER RESEARCH. INC. 

CW CHART: MITCHELL J. HAYES 


the New York investment firm of 
Sanford C. Bernstein & Co. pro¬ 
jected an installed base of 
141,964 systems by 1991. 

A surprising number of 9370s 
are now being shipped with 
IBM’s Professional Office Sys¬ 
tem (Profs), reported John C. 
McCarthy, research manager at 
Forrester. 

“Some people are trying to 
force the 9370 as an office auto¬ 
mation and personal computer 
integration vehicle with Profs, 
but I just don’t think that Profs 


9370, while seven of the sites 
have a 9370 on order and five 
said they plan to order a system. 

DEC may reap rewards 

In another survey, West Hart¬ 
ford, Conn.-based research firm 
Focus Research Systems found 
that in departmental applications 
at large companies, the 9370’s 
greatest impact will be on the 
System/38. IBM’s moves in the 
departmental computing mar¬ 
ket, Focus said, will fuel market 
growth and thus benefit its chief 


rival, Digital Equipment Corp. 

DEC last week appeared to be 
countering IBM’s 9370 deliver¬ 
ies with the announcement of 
lower prices and increased mem¬ 
ory capacities for several DEC 
VAX 8000 models that compete 
with the 9370 (see story page 1). 

In a buying survey it conduct¬ 
ed several months ago, Comput¬ 
er Intelligence in La Jolla, Calif., 
found that most of the systems 
being replaced by 9370s are 
small 4300s. 

A spokesman said the compa¬ 
ny also noticed a handful of non- 
IBM processors, such as Hon¬ 
eywell Bull, Inc. minicomputers, 
are being displaced but said 
many of the 9370 orders 
are for new applications. 

Chris Hallgren, an ana¬ 
lyst with Framingham, 
Mass.-based market re¬ 
search firm International 
Data Corp., said it is too 
early to know which com¬ 
petitors will be hurt by the 
9370, although he raised 
the possibility of Wang 
Laboratories, Inc. 

“Companies like Wang 
built their reputation by 
being small systems ven¬ 
dors with strong IBM com¬ 
patibility, at least in terms 
of their communications,” 
he said. 

Hallgren said early indi¬ 
cations are that the 9370s 
are being shipped primari¬ 
ly to companies with large 
data centers that have nu¬ 
merous branch offices such as 
banks, insurance companies and 
airlines. 

Meanwhile, Dataquest’s 
Brown noted that attempts to 
measure the 9370’s market ap¬ 
peal have been hampered be¬ 
cause IBM prohibits such firms 
from publicly speaking about the 
9370 or even responding to a re¬ 
search group’s buying intention 
survey for two years, or until 
IBM feels comfortable with the 
system’s performance and 
waives the ban. 


Unisys 

president 

resigns 

BLUE BELL, Pa. — Unisys 
Corp. President Paul G. Stern, 
the company’s third-ranking ex¬ 
ecutive, resigned unexpectedly 
last week. Unisys made the an¬ 
nouncement in conjunction with 
a restructuring of top manage¬ 
ment that observers said will 
streamline the firm’s decision 
making. 

Stern, 48, said in a prepared 
statement that his departure 
was amicable. He did not disclose 
any future career plans, saying 
he wanted to devote more time 
to family and investment inter¬ 
ests. Stern, former president of 
Burroughs Corp., said he will be 
available to Unisys for assistance 
and support in the coming 
months. 

Unisys will discontinue the 
president’s position. 

The restructuring was seen 
as a signal that Unisys is moving 
out of its transitional phase from 
the Burroughs-Sperry Corp. 
merger. Chairman W. Michael 
Blumenthal announced the dis- 
solution of the four-member Of¬ 
fice of the President, which in¬ 
cluded himself and Stern, and 
assigned specific responsibilities 
to the two other members. 

Former Sperry President Jo¬ 
seph J. Kroger, Unisys’s vice- 
chairman, will head up Unisys’s 
marketing strategy. James A. 
Unruh, executive vice-presi¬ 
dent, will oversee financial and 
international operations. 

The changes also included the 
assignment of Vice-President Jo¬ 
seph M. Tucci to direct the U.S. 
information systems business. 
The changes take effect Oct. 1. 


Hyundai hit 
by Intel suit 

SAN JOSE, Calif. — Intel Corp. 
filed suit last week against South 
Korean firms Hyundai Electron¬ 
ics America, Inc. and Hyundai 
Electronics Co. , alleging patent 
infringement of erasable pro¬ 
grammable read-only memory 
chips. 

Intel, one of several U.S. chip 
makers to lobby for federal anti¬ 
dumping measures against Japa¬ 
nese competitors last year, also 
asked the U.S. International 
Trade Commission to investi¬ 
gate its patent infringement 
charges regarding the chips. 

Intel also named two U.S. 
chip design firms and three U.S. 
distributors as defendants, alleg¬ 
ing that they worked with Hyun¬ 
dai to develop and sell the alleg¬ 
edly infringing chips. 


6 


COMPUTERWORLD 


AUGUST 10,1987 























































































NEWS 


Opponents bemoan ANSI Fortran 8X additions 


BY CHARLES BABCOCK 

CW STAFF 


Although opponents of the pro¬ 
posed Fortran 8X standard differ 
in their opinions of specific fea¬ 
tures, a cross section of those 
surveyed last week appears to 
agree that too much has been 
added to the language. 

“We thought the ANSI X3J3 
Committee was taking the lan¬ 
guage to a much greater order of 
change than we thought judi¬ 
cious,” said Michael Maynard, a 
Unisys Corp. spokesman at com¬ 
pany headquarters in Blue Bell, 
Pa. 


Robinson said. 

In addition, Robinson said the 
committee had a number of op¬ 
tions to invoke that ensure 16-, 
32- and 64-bit machines yield 
the same answer to a mathemat¬ 
ical problem but chose none of 
them. DEC advocated this issue 
be addressed, he said. 


Another feature that DEC 
wants to see revised is the IN¬ 
CLUDE statement in the For¬ 
tran 8X proposal. During a com¬ 
pile, an INCLUDE statement 
prompts the compiler to take 
code from an outside file. “The 
user is better off if the outside 
file is defined and certain limits 


put on it in the original program. 
The committee left it open-end¬ 
ed,” Robinson said. 

Brian L. Thompson, senior 
technical staff member at Con¬ 
current Computer Corp., said he 
voted in favor of the proposed 
standard as a “good faith effort” 
to reach a compromise within 


the committee but that “we 
morally side with those who are 
against it.” 

Although the opponents in¬ 
clude a number of sizable compil¬ 
er writers and manufacturers, 
there were several compiler pro¬ 
ducers besides Concurrent who 
voted in favor of Fortran 8X. 

IBM representative Richard 
Weaver could not be reached for 
comment. 


“The stand we took was that 
the language was too large and 
incorporated too many experi¬ 
mental features,” said Robert C. 
Allison, senior engineer in the 
compiler development group of 
Harris Corp., another opponent 
of the standard. 

Heavy hitters opposed 

The X3J3 Committee submitted 
the proposed standard, current¬ 
ly called Fortran 8X to reflect 
the uncertainty of the year of its 
likely approval, to its parent 
committee after a 26-9 vote in 
June. Among the nine opponents 
were a number of key Fortran 
compiler writers and users, in¬ 
cluding IBM, Digital Equipment 
Corp., Unisys, Harris and Boeing 
Computer Services. 

DEC’S X3J3 representative, 
Gary Robinson, manager of cor¬ 
porate standards, said Fortran is 
one of the languages most often 
used by DEC customers and that 
the firm wants to see a new For¬ 
tran standard emerge. Never¬ 
theless, DEC strongly opposes 
the 8X proposal. 

Robinson said the X3J3 Com¬ 
mittee is attempting to add array 
processing to Fortran compilers 
at a time when the job can be 
done better in hardware. Two 
start-up manufacturers offer the 
feature. Putting array process¬ 
ing into the standard now will re¬ 
tard the development of this new 
technology, he charged. 

Out with the old? 

Robinson also attacked the com¬ 
mittee’s proposal to name “dep¬ 
recated features” in Fortran 
with the understanding that they 
will be dropped in the next full 
version of the language. Robin¬ 
son said such a move will make 
Fortran 66 and Fortran 77 pro¬ 
grams incompatible with the 
new standard and that users will 
resist converting to the new 
standard. 

He drew an analogy to the Co- 
bol 85 opposition that emerged 
in the user community when it 
became known that compilers 
meeting the new standard would 
not be able to compile programs 
written under earlier versions. 
“These languages are just too 
old. We can’t say we don’t want 
to use their older features,” 



That’s a lot of storage 
and recall... but it’s a 
“drop in the bucket” 
compared to ABR Archive 
and Auto Recall. 

Archiving is the process of removing 
data sets from disk, and putting them instead on 
to a less expensive medium, such as tape. ABR ARCHIVE 
subsystem frees up the space occupied by inactive data sets for more 
productive use of your disk volumes. ABR can automatically recall the 
ARCHIVEd Data Set when it is referenced by a TSO or BATCH user. 

So, if you don’t have total RECALL...call Innovation and we’ll send you a 
Free No Obligation 90 Day Trial of a system that does...and you will 
receive Free, the deluxe 1987 Guinness Book of World Records. 


Bhandanta Vicitsara 
set a world record by 
reciting 16,000 pages 
of Buddhist texts! * 




] Ov.r 80 
] Over 30 


Available for IBM, OS, VSI, MVS and MVS/XA 


j Less than 30 

IIMMOVATH®M 

DATA PROCESSING 

Innovation Plaza, 275 Paterson Ave., Little Falls, NJ 07424 • (201) 890-7300 


AUGUST 10,1987 


COMPUTERWORLD 


7 






































NEWS 


PS/2 Model 80 storage raised 

Enlarged 314M-byte drive targets shared systems; low-end model arrives 


BY ALANJ. RYAN 

CW STAFF 


RYE BROOK, N.Y. — IBM last 
week announced an expanded 
storage capacity version of its 
Personal System/2 Model 80 
that will target multiuser and file 
server environments. 

The latest high-end PS/2 of¬ 
fering was accompanied by the 
announcement of the PS/2 Mod¬ 
el 25, an Intel Corp. 8086-based 
entry-level system aimed at the 
educational, home and local-area 
network markets. It was also de¬ 
signed to work with IBM Sys¬ 
tem/36 and 38 host processors 
[CW, Aug. 3J. 

Analysts said the 20-MHz 
Model 80-311 machine with 
zero to two wait states will not 
adversely affect sales of the oth¬ 
er Model 80s. 

They cited the computer’s 
main selling point as its 314M- 
byte 5 Vi -in. fixed disk drive and 
optional second drive of the 
same size. 

“The lower end Model 80s 
will be for people who need a 
high-performance workstation. 
This Model 80-311 will be more 
of a shared device,” said John 
McCarthy, director of profes¬ 
sional automation service at For¬ 
rester Research, Inc. in Cam¬ 
bridge, Mass. 

Part of major thrust 

Analyst Robert Tasker of The 
Yankee Group in Boston agreed. 
“One reason that the machine 
would have that size storage ca¬ 
pacity is to act as a large server 
in a network,” he said. “Another 


reason is IBM is preparing a ma¬ 
jor thrust for its computer-aided 
design and manufacturing pro¬ 
cessing.” 

Brian Jeffery, managing di¬ 
rector of International Technol¬ 
ogy Group in Los Altos, Calif., 
said he believes the Model 80 
could end up positioned as a mid¬ 
range system or as the low end of 
IBM’s 9370. 

“It is not a personal comput¬ 
er,” he said. “Can you imagine a 
628M-byte single user?” 

“Certainly, you’ve got an en¬ 
gine that’s in the power range of 
a System/36 or small 38 here,” 
said William Zachmann, vice- 
president of research at Interna¬ 
tional Data Corp. in Framing¬ 
ham, Mass. The Model 80-311, 
based on Intel’s 80386 proces¬ 
sor, will reportedly be available 
in the first quarter of 1988, IBM 
officials said. 

No three-year lull 

Forrester’s McCarthy said 
IBM’s release of the Model 80 
has other implications. 

“I think it shows how com¬ 
mitted IBM is to driving the 
PS/2 line aggressively. We’re 
not going to go through the 
three-year lull that we went 
through between the AT and the 
PS/2 machines,” he added. 

Standard features of the Mod¬ 
el 80-311 include 314M bytes of 
fixed-disk storage, expandable 
to a maximum of 628M bytes 
with IBM’s new 314M-byte 
Fixed Disk Drive Option; 2M 
bytes of random-access memo¬ 
ry, expandable to 4M bytes; 
IBM’s Video Graphics Array 


(VGA); IBM’s Micro Channel ar¬ 
chitecture with 32-bit data path; 
a diskette controller; serial, par¬ 
allel, pointing-device and key¬ 
board ports; and VGA graphics 
capability integrated on the sys¬ 
tem board. 

Other features include seven 
available slots and an IBM En¬ 
hanced PC Keyboard. The unit 
has a floor-standing design. 

The Model 80-311 will sell 
for $13,995, and the 314M-byte 
fixed disk drive option will cost 
an additional $6,495. 

IBM’s PS/2 Model 25 will sell 
for $1,350, but analysts said that 
even with educational discounts 
available, IBM is not likely to 
topple Apple Computer, Inc.’s 
dominance in the educational 
market. 

Apple ‘won’t lose sleep’ 

Senior analyst Michael Goulde of 
The Yankee Group said IBM will 
have a difficult time meeting Ap¬ 
ple’s challenge in the educational 
market. 

“While there are certain op¬ 
portunities for the Model 25 be¬ 
cause of its aggressive pricing 
and aggressive educational dis¬ 
counting, I don’t think Apple has 
anything to lose sleep over,” he 
said. 

Further, some analysts said 
the Model 25 will not make a big 
impact in the business market. 
“I don’t see companies — even 
small companies that are using 
System/36s and 38s — adopting 
8086 technology when, clearly, 
the trend in the market is for 286 
and 386 technology,” Goulde 
said. 



PS/2 Model 25, left, has a much smaller footprint than the 
Model 30. 


Model 25’s 
Mac assault 

BY JEAN S. BOZMAN 

CW STAFF 


IBM finally has an Apple Com¬ 
puter, Inc. Macintosh look-alike. 
The Personal System/2 Model 
25, which was announced last 
week, incorporates new features 
from IBM that play off the Mac’s 
strengths in the areas of size, 
portability and ease of use. 

First, there is the Model 25’s 
screen. Its 64 shades of gray, 
combined with the system’s Mi¬ 
crosoft Corp. Windows software, 
give the PS/2 the look and feel of 
a Macintosh. A 256-color display 
is also available. Users can cre¬ 
ate a text document and, without 
switching screens, pick up an 
icon from a space just below the 
text to start a graphics applica¬ 
tion. All the maneuvering is done 
with a two-button mouse, not a 
keyboard command. 

Perhaps spurred by the need 
to keep things simple for the ma¬ 


chine’s intended classroom audi¬ 
ence, IBM has done much to 
speed the process of getting the 
machines up and running. The 
following are some of these fea¬ 
tures: 

• A wordless instruction setup 
sheet. Users can follow a single¬ 
sheet flyer to set up the Model 
25. 

• A start-up disk, which leads the 
first-time user through disk for¬ 
matting and file labeling. With¬ 
out this feature, users had to 
learn Microsoft Corp.’s MS- 
DOS commands to perform such 
functions. 

• A single power plug for the en¬ 
tire system. IBM has piggy¬ 
backed the printer and system 
power wires so that users can 
plug a single power cord into a 
wall socket. 

The entire package is also 
made to be portable, with a 40% 
smaller footprint than that of the 
IBM Personal Computer. A car¬ 
rying case for the system is also 
available, making it movable like 
the 16-pound Macintosh, al¬ 
though quite a bit heavier. The 
Model 25 monochrome system 
weighs in at 28 pounds and the 
color version at 37 pounds. 


Fortune 500 

FROM PAGE 1 

IBM said it has shipped 
300,000 PS/2s from its produc¬ 
tion facilities to dealers and user 
sites as of the end of June. Store- 
board, Inc.’s monthly survey of 
computer specialty stores 
showed that IBM sold 29,400 
PS/2s in June, a 15% increase 
over May sales. 

Along with IBM’s sales in¬ 
creases, the top compatible mak¬ 
ers — most notably Compaq 
Computer Corp. — have report¬ 
ed sales hikes as well. For June, 
Compaq reported a 34.5% gain 
over May’s sales, the Store- 
board study showed. 

Still leery 

Some users said they are hesi¬ 
tant to jump into the PS/2 mar¬ 
ket, not only because Microsoft 
Corp. and IBM’s OS/2 is not 
available yet but because they 
are leery of a technology that has 
not had its bugs worked out. 

“We’re just looking right 
now,” explained William Griggs, 


director of telecommunications 
for Champion International 
Corp. in Hamilton, Ohio. “We 
have a couple of Model 30s in 
evaluation, and we’ll decide soon 
to either go with those or with 
PC clones.” 

“We’re undecided. We’ve got 
to get [the PS/2s in-house] to 
make sure everything works the 
way it is supposed to,” said Rick 
Migra, DP operations supervisor 
at Bendix Corp. in Elyria, Ohio. 
Migra said his company has or¬ 
dered 10 PS/2 Model 50s, which 
will be connected to an IBM 
3090 Model 200 mainframe in 
the fall. 

Natural evolution 

A handful of major corporate ac¬ 
counts, however, are not intimi¬ 
dated by the wait for OS/2 and 
have purchased or ordered sig¬ 
nificant numbers of PS/2s. MIS 
managers at such accounts said 
they see the machines as a natu¬ 
ral evolution of previous IBM of¬ 
ferings. 

“Buying PS/2s is just a con¬ 
tinuation of buying ATs. We’ll 
buy primarily Model 50s and 


some Model 60s,” said Joseph 
Brophy, senior vice-president of 
data processing at Travelers In¬ 
surance Co. in Hartford, Conn. 
Brophy said the company has 
placed orders for 5,000 PS/2s. 
He currently has 200 units in¬ 
stalled and expects to receive 
400 per month in the next year. 

In the last three months, Del¬ 
ta Air Lines and American Air¬ 
lines have purchased several 
thousand Model 30s that the 
companies will use to replace 
their own dumb terminals and to 
resell to travel agencies. 

Most large companies that 
have purchased PS/2s have cen¬ 
tered their strategy around the 
Model 50 or 60. Some have 
bought a few Model 80s but will 
use those machines primarily as 
file servers in local-area net¬ 
works (LAN). 

Few major commitments 

With the exception of the air¬ 
lines, few companies have made 
a major commitment to the Mod¬ 
el 30, either because its proces¬ 
sor is too slow or because it is not 
compatible with the IBM Micro 


Channel architecture used in the 
Models 50, 60 and 80, Compu- 
terworld found. 

Most said they would prefer 
buying an inexpensive Intel 
Corp. 80286 clone to a Model 
30. 

“If it doesn’t have the 
[PS/2’s] Micro Channel architec¬ 
ture, we aren’t interested. The 
main reason for going with the 
PS/2s is to be able to take advan¬ 
tage of what will happen in the 
PS/2 family. The Model 30 is the 
runt of the litter,” said Phil Gor¬ 
don, an information specialist 
with Charles Schwab & Co. in 
San Francisco. 

Complement, not replace 

At this point, most companies 
are buying PS/2s to comple¬ 
ment, not replace, existing ATs 
and XTs. “We are adding to our 
inventory by adding PS/2s, but 
we are not getting rid of our ATs 
in stock,” said a Travelers 
spokeswoman. 

As more PS/2s are installed, 
MIS managers are giving exist¬ 
ing ATs and XTs to either new 
employees or novice users. 


However, some MIS managers 
are giving the older systems to 
key personnel to take home. 

“A couple of years ago, when 
new things came out, we’d buy 
them and move the existing sys¬ 
tems elsewhere,” said Ed Kline, 
senior information specialist at 
Monsanto Co. in St Louis. “But 
what we’ve begun to do is put 
some in people’s homes that 
work in more strategic areas.” 

Most of the MIS managers in¬ 
terviewed said they are spread¬ 
ing all models of the PS/2 series 
among a broad spectrum of users 
— from secretaries to MIS de¬ 
partments and from research 
and development groups to top 
executives. While most are pres¬ 
ently using the models as stand¬ 
alone systems, the majority of 
the managers said they will grad¬ 
ually integrate the machines into 
LANs or connect them to main¬ 
frames as the communications 
software for OS/2 becomes 
available. 

Correspondents Julie Pitta 
and James Martin and Senior 
Editor Douglas Barney contrib¬ 
uted to this report. 


8 


COMPUTERWORLD 


AUGUST 10,1987 























ORACLE, 

your Hardware-Independent 

Software Solution 


With the ORACLE® distributed 
relational DBMS, you’ll never 
be locked into a specific 
hardware technology. 

In this year’s Software User Survey,' 
one company 


made history in 
ail three cate¬ 
gories of DBMS 
user preference. 

For minicompu¬ 
ters, Oracle is the 
number-one inde¬ 
pendent software 
vendor for the 
second year in a 
row. Digital News\ 
ranks Oracle as the number-one overall soft¬ 
ware vendor in the entire DEC marketplace. 

So does The Gartner Group.$ 

Oracle tied for mainframe honors with the 
former champion of independent software 
companies. In the MVS and VM world, ORACLE 
is second to no one. 

And Oracle made the Top-5 list in the most 
competitive arena of all: microcomputers. This 
is especially significant, since the voting was 
done BEFORE the newest version of the 
ORACLE relational DBMS was announced for 
286/386-based PCs. Now you can write OS/2 
applications without waiting for OS/2. 

Mainframes, minis and micros—all running 
the same ORACLE. Not just compatible. Not down 
sized subsets. They all run THE SAME ORACLE. 

The market has voted for ORACLE, the 
hardware-independent software solution. 

We’ve been saying SQL compatibility, port¬ 
ability across micros/minis/mainframes and 


SQL*Star’s distributed-architecture connec- 
tability make ORACLE a triple-crown 
winner in your company’s DBMS strategy. 

Now, the users are 
saying it, too. 

Don’t settle for 
anything less than 
ORACLE hardware 
independence. Find 
out what ORACLE 
could mean in your 
own future. Call 
1-800-345-DBMS 
today and register to 
attend the next 
ORACLE seminar in 
your area. Or fill out 
the attached coupon. 


Attn: National Seminar Coordinator • Oracle Corporation • One Oracle Parkway • Belmont. CA 94002 
| | Please enroll me in the FREE ORACLE seminar to be held 




at 


I I Please inform me about Oracle’s 10th anniversary celebration at ORACLE WEEK from 
1 — 1 September 27 thru 30 in Washington. DC. 

I | I can't attend your seminar, but I'd like ORACLE on my 286/386 PC immediately. 

1 — 1 Please send me the products checked off below, now. 

□ Professional ORACLE. $1,295. Requires IBM PC/AT, Compaq 386, or 100% compatible, 

DOS 3.1 +, and 1.5MB of RAM. Includes the SQL*Forms™ 4GL application builder, 
SQL*Plus™ language, SQL*Report™ generator and the SQL*Calc™ 1-2-3-like spreadsheet. 
Precompilers included for Microsoft C and Lattice C. 

0 Precompiler for Realia COBOL. Add $395. 

0 Networking option with all available protocols. Add $395. 

Prices shown include UPS shipping charges if the order is pre-paid. Since Oracle Corporation has 
offices everywhere, add local and state taxes to the amount below: 

_ Amount of purchase checked above. 

_ State and Local Sales Taxes. 

= _ Authorized Total (For purchase orders, shipping charges will he added lo your invoice) 

Name_Title 

Company 


$ _ 
+ 


City 


Zip 


Enclosed is 0 a check, 0 a purchase order or 0 credit card for 0 VISA, 0 MC or 0 AMEX. 

Credit card or PO, number_Card Exp. Date_Order Date 


Authorizing Signature 


U.S. SEMINARS 


AK 

AL 

AR 

AZ 

CA 


CO 

CT 

DE 

FL 


Anchorage. 

Huntsville.Jul 9, 

Little Rock.Jul 7, 

Phoenix ... Jul 14, Aug 27, 

Tucson. 

Lafayette.Jul 30, 

Los Angeles.Jul 16, 

Sep 8, 

Newport Beach.Jul 21, 

Sacramento. 

San Diego.Jul 30, 

San Francisco.Jul 21, 

San Jose.Jul 9, Aug 6, 

Colorado Springs .. Jul 16, 

Denver.Jul 14, Aug 13, 

Hartford (Farmington). 

New Haven. 

Wilmington.Jul 9, 

Ft. Lauderdale. 

Jacksonville. 


Sep 9 
Sep 17 
Sep 16 
Sep 24 
Aug 26 
Sep 24 
Aug 13, 
Sep 30 
Sep 17 
Aug 13 
Sep 10 
Aug 18, 
Sep 15 
Sep 2 
Sep 17 
Sep 15 
.Jul 23 
.Jul 28 
Sep 1 
.Jul 16 
Sep 9 


GA 

HI 

IA 

IL 

IN 

KS 

KY 

LA 

MA 


MD 

Ml 


Orlando...Jul 15 

Tampa......Sep 10 

Atlanta.Jul 8, Sep 16 

Macon.Aug 13 

Honolulu.Sep 17 

Des Moines.Jul 15, Sep 17 

Chicago.... Jul 14, Aug 19, Sep 15 

Springfield.Aug 11 

Indianapolis.Jul 21, Aug 12, 

Sep 24 

Wichita.Aug 4 

Louisville.Sep 10 

Baton Rouge.Jul 23 

New Orleans.Aug 21 

Boston.Jul 16, Aug 25, Sep 10 

Burlington.Sep 30 

Springfield.Sep 16 

Worcester.Aug 5 

Baltimore.Jul 28, Sep 3 

Bethesda... Jul 28, Aug 6, Sep 8 

Detroit.Jul 14, Aug 11, Sep 15 

Grand Rapids.Jui 8 

Traverse City.Jul 28 


MN 

MO 


NC 


NE 

NH 

NJ 


NM 

NV 

NY 


Minneapolis.Jul 28, Aug 26, 

Sep 29 

Kansas City.Jul 23, Sep 22 

St. Louis... Jul 16, Aug 18, Sep 16 

Charlotte.Jul 22, Sep 23 

Raleigh.Jul 15, Sep 16 

Winston-Salem.Aug 12 

Omaha.Jul 9 

Manchester.Aug 27 

Nashua.Aug 13 

Cherry Hill.Jul 30, Sep 9 

Iselin.Jul 15, Jul 23, Aug 5, 

Aug 18, Sep 16, Sep 29 
Princeton... Jul 9, Aug 12, Sep 22 

Albuquerque.Jul 7, Sep 22 

Las Vegas.Jul 9, Sep 9 

Albany.Jul 14 

Buffalo.Aug 6, Sep 29 

Long Island.Sep 15 

New York City.Jul 8, Jul 16, 

Jul 22, Jul 29, Aug 6, Aug 13 
Aug 19, Sep 9, Sep 17, Sep 23 
Rochester.. Jul 30, Aug 20, Sep 22 


Syracuse . 

OH Cincinnati. 

Cleveland.Jul 16, 

Columbus.Aug 4, 

Dayton.Jul 21, Aug 18, 

OK Oklahoma City.Jul 21, 

Tulsa. 

OR Portland. 

PA Harrisburg.Aug 4, 

King of Prussia.Jul 16, 

Philadelphia.Jui 9, 

Pittsburgh. 

Rl Province. 

SC Charleston. 

TN Memphis. 

Nashville. 

TX Austin. 

Dallas.Jul 14, 

Houston.Jul 9, Aug 6, 

Lubbock. 

San Antonio. 


..Jul 7 
Aug 5 
Aug 13, 
Sep 17 
Sep 30 
Sep 22 
Sep 15 
Aug 11 
..Jul 21 
Sep 15 
Sep 17 
Aug 6, 
Sep 10 
Sep 8 
..Jul 8 
Aug 12 
..Jul 29 
Aug 6 
Aug 12 
Sep 9 
Sep 18 
Aug 4 
Aug 13 


UT Salt Lake City.Jul 28, Sep 29 

VA Norfolk.Jul 14 

Richmond.Jul 8, Sep 8 

Virginia Beach.Jul 23 

VT Burlington.Sep 2 

WA Seattle.Aug 6, Sep 3 

Wl Green Bay.Aug 10 

Madison.Aug 20 

Milwaukee.Jul 22, Sep 3 

Canadian Seminars 

Calgary.Jul 15, Sep 9 

Edmonton.Aug 25 

Hamilton.Aug 18 

London.Jul 14, Sep 15 

Montreal.Jul 22, Aug 19 

Ottawa.Jul 4, Aug 6, Sep 3 

Quebec City.Jul 8, Aug 5 

Toronto.Jul 7, Aug 18, Sep 8 

Vancouver.Jul 23, Sep 17 

Victoria.Aug 20 

Winnipeg.Aug 11 





COMPATIBILITY • PORTABILITY • CONNECTABILITY 

One Oracle Parkway • Belmont, CA 94022 • World Headquarters (415)598-8000 
Calgary (403)265-2622 • Ottawa (613) 238-2381 • Quebec (514) 337-0755 • Toronto (416) 596-7750 
ORACLE-UK (SURREY) 44-1-948-6976 • ORACLE-EUROPE (NAARDEN, THE NETHERLANDS) 31-2159-49344 


Call 1-800-345-DBMS today. 

• 1987 Software User Survey, published by Software News, © 1987 by Sentry Publishing Company. Inc 
t Digital News. December 1. 1986. 
t Gartner Group currently available research. 

© 1987 by Oracle Corporation. ORACLE* is a registered trademark and Professional ORACLE. SQL'Forms. 
SQL*Star, SQL*Report and SQL’Calc are trademarks of Oracle Corporation. The other companies mentioned 
own numerous registered trademarks. TRBA 























































































































































NEWS 


Unisys welcomes Ally to its 4GL fold 


BY ROSEMARY HAMILTON 

CW STAFF 


Unisys Corp. expanded its 
fourth-generation language of¬ 
ferings last week with the intro¬ 
duction of Ally, a system for the 
Unix and MS-DOS worlds. 

A separate version of Ally, 


which was previously owned by 
three other vendors, is offered 
by Digital Equipment Corp. as a 
VMS product called Rally. 

Ally runs on Unisys Unix- 
based systems as well as the 
company’s microcomputers. But 
the product reportedly will be of¬ 
fered as an independent system 


and will run on any hardware 
platform using the Unix or Mi¬ 
crosoft Corp. MS-DOS operat¬ 
ing systems. Also, Unisys hopes 
to license the system to other 
vendors, according to Fred 
Meier, vice-president of corpo¬ 
rate program management. 

James Davey, a senior consul¬ 


tant at Digital Consulting, Inc., 
said he expects the product to do 
well in the Unix market, in which 
it will compete with Unify 
Corp.’s Unify and Informix Soft¬ 
ware, Inc.’s Informix. He also 
said Ally is “light-years ahead” 
of development tools in the MS- 
DOS arena. “This is a main¬ 
frame-class product on a micro,” 
he added. 

The initial release will sup- 



MACINTOSH WEEK AT BUSINESSLAND 



Now that Macintosh™ can fit so seamlessly into the IBM7DOS 
environment, we’re holding Macintosh Week August 17th through 
21st at all Businessland* Centers nationwide. 

That means free seminars and events for MIS/DP managers 
and executives. 

You can take the Macintosh SE for a test drive. Or experience 
the blazing speed of the Macintosh II. Based on the 68020 
processor, the newest Macintosh has color for vivid graphics, 
and open architecture for maximum expandability of memory to 
handle the biggest jobs. 

Most importantly, you’ll find out about the new connection 
between IBM and Apple! About the new network from 3Com® 
called 3+ for Macintosh that works 
with both Macintosh and PCs. About 
DOS compatibility cards and the new 
option of 286 emulation. 

You’ll even learn how Macintosh 
talks with IBM mainframes. 

And as far as Businessland is 
concerned, that’s talking business. 

For our Macintosh Week event 
schedule, contact your local 
Businessland Center. To 
find the one nearest you, 
call (800) 323-1000. ' 


BUSINESS^ 

A Different Kind of Computer Company 

Trademarks/owner: Macintosh, Apple/McIntosh Laboratory, Inc.; IBM/Intemational Business Machines Corporation; 3Com/3Com Corp., Businessland, Businessland logo/Businessland, Inc. 
Macintosh is a trademark of McIntosh Laboratory, Inc. and is being used with its express permission. Businessland is an authorized Apple dealer. 


port the Oracle relational data 
base management system from 
Oracle Corp. and Ashton-Tate’s 
Dbase III, Meier said. 

The Ally product had a long 
history before its introduction. 
Ally development work began in 
1982 at Cary, N.C.-based Foun¬ 
dation Computer Systems, Inc., 
which is now a wholly owned 
subsidiary of Unisys. As an inde¬ 
pendent company, Foundation li¬ 
censed the product to DEC in 
1984, which introduced it a year 
ago as Rally. 

Basil Harris, senior product 
manager for Rally, said the sys¬ 
tem has been enhanced since 
DEC acquired exclusive rights to 
market it on the VAX. “The 
products are very dissimilar in 
terms of what the user sees. 
DEC added a whole user inter¬ 
face layer on top of Ally that 
makes the application develop¬ 
ment process much easier,” he 
said. 

Rally applications can be de¬ 
veloped to work with DEC’S 
DBMS data base management 
system, RDB relational data 
base management system, RMS 
file management system and All- 
In-1 office automation system, 
Harris said. 

In 1984, Encore Computer 
Corp. purchased Foundation and 
the rights to Ally. But Encore 
sold the company to Sperry 
Corp. in April 1986. With the ac¬ 
quisition of Sperry last year by 
Burroughs Corp., Foundation 
became a part of the new corpo¬ 
ration, Unisys. 

According to Richard 
Goyette, corporate program 
manager of fourth-generation 
languages at Unisys, Ally re¬ 
ceived little modification after 
the Sperry-Burroughs deal. 

Ally is based on a concept of 
reusable code. It contains 140 
modules that are commonly used 
subroutines in programming ap¬ 
plications. 

Finding its place 

Ally joins two other fourth-gen¬ 
eration language offerings from 
Unisys. Right now, it is unclear 
how the three will fit together, 
according to Shaku Atre, presi¬ 
dent of Atre International Con¬ 
sultants, Inc. 

Mapper, which originated 
from Sperry, is a development 
environment that focuses on 
end-user computing. Line, which 
came from Burroughs, is intend¬ 
ed for the complex design of 
business systems. 

According to Meier, Ally is a 
combination of Mapper and Line. 
But Atre said the product is very 
similar to Mapper and “eventu¬ 
ally, the company will put more 
emphasis on whatever one is 
selling better; and the other one 
has to find a new home. ’ ’ 

Licenses range from $695 for 
an MS-DOS version to $32,000 
for a large Unix system version. 
Runtime-only licenses, which al¬ 
low users to run an application 
developed in Ally, range in price 
from $200 to $8,000. 


10 


COMPUTERWORLD 


AUGUST 10,1987 





























































AJOR IMPROVEMENT 
H EXPERT SYSTEM 




‘ix hundred MIS profes¬ 
sionals were recently 
asked to rank key issues fac¬ 
ing them today* Your top 
five concerns are listed to 
the right. One company has 
distinguished itself by help¬ 
ing several hundred organi¬ 
zations utilize expert systems 
to address these issues. One 
company can help you use 
existing personnel, existing 
computer hardware, existing 
applications software and 
EXISTING BUDGET to im¬ 
plement expert systems 
solutions. The company is 
Teknowledge. 

11 That successful 

VV APPLICATIONS 
OF EXPERT SYSTEMS 
CAN TEKNOWLEDGE 
SHOW ME? 

Teknowledge’s expert sys¬ 
tems development tools 
account for more fielded, 
knowledge-based applications 
than those of any other AI 
firm. No company’s expert 
systems tools are available 
across a wider range of 
hardware and operating sys¬ 
tems. Teknowledge was 
awarded (1) the first three 
patents for expert systems 
software; and (2) the largest 
Department of Defense con¬ 
tract ever granted a commer¬ 
cial company for expert sys¬ 
tems development software. 

Expert systems capture 
human knowledge, and 
automate its use by many 
people. In other words, they 
can be applied where human 
judgment plays a role: 

• Financial Applications: 

A major US bank has 
fielded a credit-evaluation 
expert system. 

• Risk Analysis: One of the 
top-ten international petro¬ 
leum companies assesses the 
risks of oil exploration in 
specific areas. 

• Printing and Publishing: 
One of the largest US news¬ 
papers automates the layout 
and positioning of printing 
plates. 


YOUR FIVE TOP CONCERNS 
AND TEKNOWLEDGE’S 
SOLUTIONS 

1. ISSUE: ALIGNING MIS 

WITH BUSINESS GOALS 

SOLUTION: Expert systems allow you to extend and 
automatically apply the knowledge responsible for your 
competitive success. No other company has done this 
with more applications than Teknowledge. 

2. ISSUE: DATA UTILIZATION 

SOLUTION: The database revolution allowed us to cap¬ 
ture and store data. The expert systems revolution 
allows us to capture knowledge which utilizes the accu¬ 
mulated data. Teknowledge-based expert systems may be 
integrated with existing DBMS and other applications, 
and are portable across mainframes, minicomputers, 
workstations and PCs. 

3. ISSUE: EDUCATING SENIOR PERSONNEL 

SOLUTION: Successful implementation of major 
projects requires senior management understanding and 
commitment. Teknowledge can customize an executive 
briefing and help you communicate the strategic poten¬ 
tial of expert systems. 

4. ISSUE: SOFTWARE DEVELOPMENT 

SOLUTION: Expert systems shells are effective high- 
level programming tools for developing new applications, 
and for improving both functionality and maintenance 
of existing applications. Teknowledge’s expert system shells, 
M.l** and S.l*** permit development of applications previ¬ 
ously thought impractical due to complexity or cost. 

5. ISSUE: PRODUCTIVITY 

SOLUTION: Teknowledge understands the costs asso¬ 
ciated with introducing new technology: Productivity is 
lowest at the beginning of the learning curve. To 
minimize these startup costs, Teknowledge has deve¬ 
loped a product line that can be applied by your engi¬ 
neers, delivered on your existing computer hardware, 
and integrated with online applications. 


• Customer Service: A com¬ 
puter manufacturer has 
embedded a field-service 
expert system into its inter¬ 
national network which 
diagnoses faults at customer 
sites BEFORE they occur. 
An insurance company 
diagnoses faults and expe¬ 
dites corrective action in 
20,000 computers. 


JCHEDULE AN 
1 ON-SITE 
DISCUSSION TODAY* 

You have five major 
concerns: aligning MIS with 
business goals; data utiliza¬ 
tion; educating senior 
personnel; software develop¬ 
ment; and productivity. You 
have a budget to address 
these concerns. Now, you 
have our phone number, 
(415) 424-9955, and five very 
good reasons to use it. 

Call or write Teknowledge 
today, to schedule a no¬ 
obligation discussion, at 
your site, with a team of the 
industry’s foremost knowl¬ 
edge engineering profes¬ 
sionals. 




• Engineering: An automo¬ 
bile manufacturer uses the 
output from an expert sys¬ 
tem to drive a CAD system 
which produces complete 
engineering drawings. 

• Education: Not only can 
the accuracy of diagnosed 
learning deficiencies be veri¬ 
fied, but educators are taught 
to more accurately classify 
learning-disabled students. 


My business card or 
company letterhead is 
attached. 

E] Please call as soon as 
possible to schedule an 
in-depth discussion. 

□ I’d like to attend the next 
free, half-day seminar in 
my area. 

CD Please send me a partial 
customer list and a 
more detailed discussion 
of expert systems 
applications. 


TIKMOWUPSE 

Applied Artificial Intelligence 

1850 Embarcadero Road 

P.O. Box 10119 

Palo Alto, California 94303 

(415)424-9955 


©Teknowledge 1987. 
TEKNOWLEDGE* is a registered trade¬ 
mark of Teknowledge, Inc. 

* Washington University Center for 
The Study of Data Processing as 
reported in the 11/15/86 DATA¬ 
MATION, pp 79-86. 

**U.S. Pat. 4,648,044. 

*** US. Pat. 4, 658, 370. 






































NEWS 


Leading Edge to ship AT compatible 


BY ALAN J. RYAN 

CW STAFF 


CANTON, Mass. — Leading 
Edge Hardware Products, Inc. 
announced plans last week to be¬ 
gin shipping its Model D2 IBM 
Personal Computer AT-compat- 
ible computer. 


The unit, manufactured by 
Daewoo Telecom Co. in South 
Korea, utilizes Intel Corp.’s 
80286 processor chip and fea¬ 
tures 640K bytes of standard 
memory, expandable to 1M byte 
on the motherboard, and a 1.2M- 
byte floppy disk. 

John Sullivan, vice-president 


of Leading Edge, said he expects 
the Model D2 will run OS/2 
when that operating system be¬ 
comes available from IBM and 
Microsoft Corp. sometime next 
year. 

Model D2 shipments are 
scheduled to begin later this 
month and early next month in 


sample quantities to Leading 
Edge dealers, Sullivan said. “A 
more representative volume will 
be shipped to our dealer base in 
the latter part of September,” 
he said. The unit will sell for 
$1,495. 

Also scheduled to be shipped 
are an optional 30M-byte hard¬ 
disk version, which will sell for 
$1,995, and a “superspeed” 
drive, which will reportedly be a 


sub-30-msec drive with either a 
30M-byte or 40M-byte hard 
drive, according to Sullivan. No 
price has been set. 

Fighting bad rep 

While Leading Edge has been of¬ 
ten criticized by dealers and cus¬ 
tomers because of delays in ship¬ 
ping its Model D computer, 
Sullivan said the firm is combat¬ 
ting that reputation. 

“We have been getting prod¬ 
ucts out on a more timely basis 
during the last couple of 
months,” he said. 

The company said the 286 
clone is one-third smaller than 
the comparable PC AT, with a 
footprint of 16 by 15V2 in. and is 
about 6 in. high. 


NATURAL 2 and the bottom line. 



“Time is money. 

The bottom line with 
NATURAL 2 is that you 
can develop and deliver 
finished systems, faster.” 


Jim Wisdom 
Boston University 


Jim Wisdom can be a tough critic. Tough, but fair. Speaks his mind. 
That’s why we asked him to beta test NATURAL 2. 

That’s also why his reactions are so nice to hear. 

“NATURAL 2 gives you everything you need to develop and deliver 
online systems, completely and thoroughly’’ he says. “With NATURAL 2 
and other Software AG products, our end users themselves are developing 
systems that are going into production. Not many people can say that.” 

For reasons like these, NATURAL has become the de facto standard for 
applications development at Boston University—and at nearly 2500 other 
sites around the world. Which is also nice to hear. 

Discover NATURAL 2. The Next Dimension in 4th Generation 
technology. 


For a free NATURAL 2 
presentation diskette, 
call: 1-800-843-9534 

(In Virginia or Canada, 
call 703-860-5050) 


tm SOftlJORRe RG 

& PROGRAMMING BUSINESS SUCCESS 


NCR pays 
user record 
damages 


BY CLINTON WILDER 

CW STAFF 


SAN LUIS OBISPO, Calif. — 
NCR Corp. recently reached a 
multimillion dollar out-of-court 
agreement that represents the 
largest damages award ever 
granted in a user suit against a 
computer vendor. 

The settlement, made earlier 
this year, ended eight years of le¬ 
gal battling between Madonna 
Construction Co. President Alex 
Madonna and the Dayton, Ohio- 
based systems vendor. Norman 
Cohen, an Atlanta-based consul¬ 
tant to users who have sued 
NCR, said Madonna received al¬ 
most $6 million. 

An NCR spokesman denied 
that figure and declined further 
comment except to say the set¬ 
tlement was “amicable.” 

Surpasses previous record 

Madonna had won a record $5.8 
million damages award in a Cali¬ 
fornia Superior Court decision 
two years ago [CW, June 3, 
1985], far surpassing the previ¬ 
ous record $2.6 million awarded 
to an Oakland, Calif., dry clean¬ 
ing firm, Glovatorium, Inc., in 
1982. 

NCR agreed to the settle¬ 
ment one day before its appeal of 
the 1985 Superior Court deci¬ 
sion was to be heard in a Santa 
Barbara, Calif., appeals court, a 
source close to the case said. 

Neither Madonna nor his at¬ 
torney nor NCR would confirm 
the amount of the settlement. 

Madonna, the leader of one of 
California’s largest highway con¬ 
struction contractors, said he 
was “very pleased” with the set¬ 
tlement but declined further 
comment. NCR generally re¬ 
quires the plaintiffs in user suits 
to sign nondisclosure agree¬ 
ments after their cases are set¬ 
tled. 


12 


COMPUTERWORLD 


AUGUST 10,1987 


















NEWS 


PS/2 board, floppy drive hit market 

Tecmarfounder’s start-up leads charge as third parties solve Micro Channel puzzle 


BY ED SCANNELL 

CW STAFF 


CLEVELAND — Cumulus Corp., a start¬ 
up company headed by Tecmar, Inc. 
founder Martin Alpert, last week intro¬ 
duced a multifunction add-in board for the 
IBM Micro Channel-based Personal Sys¬ 
tem/2 family along with an external 514- 
in. floppy disk drive that can act as the A 
drive on the PS/2. 

The multifunction board, called 
Curam, holds up to 8M bytes of memory 
and has an optional 2,400 bit/sec. modem 
and an I/O card containing a serial or a 
parallel port in one slot. A 2M-byte ver¬ 
sion of the board costs $995, with 2M- 
and 4M-byte daughter cards priced at 
$595 and $995, respectively. The modem 
will sell for $445. 

By combining multiple functions on a 
single board, Curam gives users who are 
considering a PS/2 Model 60 for its 
expandability a strong reason to purchase 
the less expensive Model 50, which has 
only three expansion slots, according to 
Cumulus President Alpert. 

By using two Curam boards, users 
“can get 16M bytes, serial and parallel 
ports and a modem for the Model 50,” he 
said. “For a lot of people, that’s the differ¬ 
ence between buying the Model 50 and 
Model 60.” 

Doing the impossible? 

IBM claims the Model 50 cannot be up¬ 
graded past 7M bytes, but Alpert said Cu¬ 
mulus has run the system with 16M 
bytes, leaving one slot still open. 

The multifunction board supports both 
the Lotus/Intel/Microsoft Expanded 
Memory Specification (EMS) and the En¬ 
hanced EMS. The latter can be used to 
run multiple IBM PC-DOS programs in 
more than 640K bytes of memory space; 
EMS is commonly used to store large 

Chart rewrite 
to offer 3-D 

REDMOND, Wash. — Microsoft Corp. is 
scheduled to announce today a new ver¬ 
sion of Chart, a $395 graphics package for 
IBM Personal Computers and compati¬ 
bles, that is aimed at business and scientif¬ 
ic applications. 

Microsoft Chart Version 3.0 now in¬ 
cludes mouse support and support for 
three-dimensional graphics, features 
lacking in the firm’s earlier versions. The 
package will be available immediately. 

Unlike earlier versions, the package 
runs on local-area networks (LAN), in¬ 
cluding Microsoft Networks and any net¬ 
work compatible with IBM’s PC Net¬ 
work. LAN support is built into the 
product to let users share expensive peri¬ 
pherals, such as laser printers and plot¬ 
ters, and provide users with external 
data. Each additional user on a network 
must purchase the $195 Workstation 
Pack. For the scientific community, the 
package includes expanded statistical 
functions such as regressions and line 
smoothing. 


blocks of data in memory. 

The external drive, called Stepping 
Stone, includes software and microcoded 
hardware, which allows it to function as 
the A drive. That feature is important for 
users of Lotus Development Corp.’s 1-2- 
3, which is copy protected and requires a 
key diskette in the A drive in order to run. 
Stepping Stone can also be used to con¬ 
vert programs from 514- to 31/2-in. for¬ 
mats. The price, including a half-height 
drive, a controller, cabling and software, 
is $345, compared with $395 for IBM’s 


external 5 Vi-in. drive. 

Cumulus said it is currently shipping 
Curam and that it intends to ship Stepping 
Stone in the next two weeks. 

Alpert, who developed some of the 
first add-in products for the original IBM 
PC at Tecmar before selling the firm to 
Rexon, Inc., said writing to the Micro 
Channel architecture was a delicate job. 
“You have to be very conscious of timing, 
particularly in the area of direct memory 
access,” he added. 

Despite reports earlier this year from 


add-in board makers that it would be ex¬ 
tremely difficult to develop a multifunc¬ 
tion board for the Micro Channel, Alpert 
said his firm had little difficulty because it 
“piggybacked” the daughtercards on the 
board, essentially creating a multifunc¬ 
tion card from three separate boards. 

Cumulus will introduce a complete line 
of products for the PS/2 and is now work¬ 
ing on six products for “specific markets 
that are large and growing,” Alpert said, 
including communication products that 
take advantage of the Micro Channel’s 
ability to support multiple processors. 

“We have a distinct strategy now, 
based on multiprocessors and [Microsoft 
and IBM’s] OS/2. Our goal is to have a 
product ready by the time OS/2 ships,” 
Alpert said. 



Do you recognize the three horns of 
the menacing Trisysgenatops: 1. too long 
(and too many) sysgens; 2. a severe 
lack of virtual storage; 3. long lead times 
for adding new users to IMS/VS? 

DELTA IMS VIRTUAL TERMINAL* 
from BMC Software stops this triple 
threat to your IMS/VS system. With 
DELTA IMS VIRTUAL TERMINAL on 
your side you can: 

■ Dramatically reduce the number and 
duration of IMS/VS sysgens, 

■ Save virtual storage by requiring con¬ 
trol blocks only for active terminals, 

■ Rapidly add new IMS/VS users. 

DELTA IMS VIRTUAL TERMINAL is 

today’s product for making the triple¬ 
horned Trisysgenatops a menace of 
the past. 

‘virtual terminal: 1. any 3270 or SLU-2 type display in the 
network that is not defined to IMSA/S, not even within a ge¬ 
neric pool; 2. a control block that is dynamically created and 
deleted for the user at logon and logoff; 3. capable of main¬ 
taining a one-for-one relationship between a userid and an 
IMSA/S logical terminal. 


Trisysgenatops (tri• sys• GEN*a*tops) 


For more information, or to begin a 
30-Day-Plus free trial on DELTA IMS 
VIRTUAL TERMINAL, clip and mail the 
attached coupon or call BMC Software. 


1 800 841-2031 in the USA 

or (713) 240-8800 
1 800 231 -2698 in Canada 
(0276) 24622 in the United Kingdom 
(069) 66 4060 in West Germany 
(02) 7382213 in Italy 


m 

SOFTWARE 



BMC Software, Inc. 

RO. Box 2002 • Sugar Land, TX 77487-2002 

□ Contact me about a 30-Day-Plus free trial of 
DELTA IMS VIRTUAL TERMINAL. 

□ Contact me with more information on 
DELTA IMS VIRTUAL TERMINAL. 


cw 


Name. 


Title. 


Company. 
Address _ 
City_ 


. State/Prov.. 


. Zip/RC.. 


Phone. 


AUGUST 10,1987 


COMPUTERWORLD 


13 































Get the Facts 
from Your DBMS. 







SYSTEM 2000* 
Software 

.. —W mmm . 



Data Analysis 


• • 


Reports and 


Business 

1 

j 

Decision 


Applications 

Graphs 


Planning 


Support 


Development 

1 


ii 

r 


ggli he most powerful applications software has 

i Mg 

joined forces with the most popular data base 
management systems. To turn raw data into 
meaningful facts. To analyze, estimate, optimize, 
simulate. To produce custom reports and color graphs. 
Whatever your information need, the SAS System 
delivers more from the data you store. 


Don’t Just Store Your Data. 

Explore Your Data. 

The SAS System’s ready-to-use tools uncover the 
real meaning of all those names and numbers. Forecast 
sales and cash flow. Perform statistical analyses. Build 
financial and planning models. Create spreadsheets of 
unlimited size. Schedule projects for best use of time 
and resources. Produce stacks of personalized letters. 
Generate calendars, charts, and many other formatted 
reports. Spot relationships and graph trends with 
powerful presentation graphics. 

Or develop your own applications with the SAS 
System’s efficient fourth-generation language. 

Customize these applications any way you wish. 

If You Know Data Bases. 

And Even if You Don’t. 

Menu-driven interfaces link the SAS System with DB2, 
SQL/DS, or IMS data bases, and with SYSTEM 2000® 
Data Management Software. End users, even those 


who know nothing about data bases, have immediate 
access to the data they need. It’s as easy as 
in the blanks! 

Extract data 
from your 
DBMS for use 
in SAS System 
applications. 

Load data 
from the SAS 
System directly 
into your DBMS. 

Update values in a data base directly from a SAS 
System application. All without risk to data security. 
The SAS System lets you choose which users browse 
or update specific files. 


DB2 INTERFACE 

TABLE NAME: DB2.PERSONNEL 

DATA EXTRACTION PANEL 

SAS DATA SET: PERS.SUBSET 

C0MMAND===> 


FIJNC COLUMN NAME SAS NAME 

FORMAT 

♦** table- personnel 

* COLUMNS.- 14 * SELECTED- 0 * 

lASTNAME 

$10. 

FIRSTNME . 

$10. 

5 MIDINfT . 


5 ADDRESS . 

t:*o. 

5 STATE . 

$ 2 . 

j ZIP . 

$10. 

PHONE 

$1 

SSN . 

$15. 

HI REDATE . 

L.O 

' BERTCODE . 

$7. 

SUPERV1S . 

$20. 

DIVISION . . 

$-10. 

TITLE . 


W vKl '.LHUjl 


city = bat tinore_ 



Get the Facts Todays 
And Get 30 Days FREE. 

Bring the SAS System together with your data 
base. You’ll receive high-quality software—plus 
training, documentation, and support-all from SAS 
Institute Inc. We’ll even provide a free software trial 
to get acquainted. For details, call or write today. 


M 


SAS Institute Inc. 

SAS Circle □ Box 8000 
Cary, NC 27512-8000 
Phone (919) 467-8000 
Fax (919) 469-3737 




if 














































Ridge Medical Supplies Inc. 



Regional Sales 



Sales Breakdown 

Southeast Northeast 


Division A 

*205.000 

*102,000 

Division B 

115,000 

345,000 

Division C 

225,000 

300,000 

Division D 

165,000 

270,000 

Division E 

225,000 

215,000 



Morgan Cosmetics Inc. 

P Chart for Perfume Bottle Capacity 


3 n Limits: 


Subgroup Sizes: Min n » 1836 Max n * 5253 


EMS Software International 

Countries with Products Installed 

As of January 1, 1987 



Quarterly Sales 




Schedule for Well No. 121-005 


>B ACTIVITY 


1 Dril Wei 


2 Construct Power Line 

3 Excavate 


4 Deliver Material 

5 Assemble Tank 


6 Pump House 

7 Install Pump 


0 Foundation 
9 Install Pipe 


10 Erect Tower 


JUL JUL JUL JUL JUL JUL JUL JUL JUL JUL JUL JUL JUL 

01 02 03 04 05 06 07 08 09 10 11 12 13 



DURATION OF A NORMAL JOB 
DURATION OF A CRITICAL JOB 
TARGET 


SLACK TIME FOR A NORMAL JOB 
BREAK DUE TO HOLIDAY 


The SAS System runs on IBM Corp.’s 370/30xx/43xx and compatible machines, as well as minicomputers and personal computers. 

SAS and SYSTEM 2000 are registered trademarks of SAS Institute Inc., Cary, NC, USA. 082, SQL/DS, and IMS are products of IBM Corporation, Armonk, NY. IDMS/R is a product of 
Cullinet Software, Inc., Westwood, MA. 

Copyright © 1987 by SAS Institute Inc. Printed in the USA. 
























NEWS 


DEC starts Mac attack with VAX data link 


BY DOUGLAS BARNEY 

CW STAFF 


MAYNARD, Mass. — In a move 
aimed at boosting sales of its 
VAX computers to Apple Com¬ 
puter, Inc. Macintosh sites, Digi¬ 
tal Equipment Corp. will cooper¬ 


ate with Odesta Corp., maker of 
Helix, on development of a data 
base that runs on both Macin¬ 
toshes and VAXs. 

The agreement, set for an¬ 
nouncement tomorrow, is the 
first public endorsement by DEC 
of any Macintosh-oriented prod¬ 


uct. “It is very unusual for DEC 
to go that far. They get involved 
in very few joint announce¬ 
ments,” said John Rutledge, 
vice-president of research for 
Dillon, Read & Co., a New York- 
based investment firm. 

Under the agreement, DEC 


will supply Odesta with software 
and hardware for development, 
use Helix as a tool for DEC sales 
agents and give Odesta direction 
on product implementation. A 
key goal for DEC and Odesta, 
one source said, is to allow DEC 
terminals to access Helix VMX. 


For DEC, the announcement 
is part of an overall strategy to 
embrace a variety of desktop ar¬ 
chitectures. “We are interested 
in attracting all people with de¬ 
vices on their desks, whether 
they happen to be Digital devices 
or other peoples’ machines,” 
said Richard Smith, DEC’s man¬ 
ager of business development for 
the Microvax. DEC has already 
made such an effort to attach 
IBM Personal Computers and 
compatibles to VAXs and Micro- 
vaxes. 

Now DEC is going after Mac¬ 
intosh users. “I am interested in 
the people who own Macin¬ 
toshes and maybe don’t know 
about Digital. They might be a 
lot more interested in us now 
that they know they can start out 
with Helix on the Mac and move 
up to the VAX with absolutely no 
change in the style of comput¬ 
ing,” Smith said. 

Despite this agreement, DEC 
has still not stated its position on 
the Macintosh itself, which com¬ 
petes against DEC’s Vaxmate, 
an IBM PC compatible. 

“Don’t read anything about 
Macs into this,” Smith cau¬ 
tioned. Rather, it is an example 
of DEC’s “open network poli¬ 
cy,” he argued. 

Apple sees endorsement 

An Apple official, however, said 
he believes the announcement 
proves that DEC is behind the 
Macintosh. “The DEC relation¬ 
ship endorses the whole concept 
of programming with the unique 
tools and approaches available in 
the Mac environment as much as 
it also endorses the Macintosh as 
a workstation,” said Peter 
Hirshberg, marketing manager 
for desktop communications at 
Apple. 

DEC’s effort should be large¬ 
ly aimed at helping Odesta en¬ 
hance Helix VMX, which re¬ 
quires a VAX or a Microvax. 
Unlike earlier versions of Helix, 
which run only on the Macin¬ 
tosh, Helix VMX provides appli¬ 
cations development on a Macin¬ 
tosh, with much of the 
processing distributed on the 
VAX. Helix applications are de¬ 
veloped with an icon-driven sys¬ 
tem rather than more conven¬ 
tional programming languages 
with which it can be difficult and 
time-consuming to work. 

According to Odesta founder 
and President Daniel Cheifetz, 
the DEC backing provides a 
product development boost. 
“What they are doing is more 
than just a blessing. They are 
providing hardware and soft¬ 
ware support and a significant 
level of technical support,” Chei¬ 
fetz said. 

Odesta is reportedly working 
to enhance Helix’s access to 
VAX Record Management Sys¬ 
tem (RMS) files. “Eighty per¬ 
cent of the data in VAXs is in 
RMS flat files. You won’t have to 
use the Helix file structure in the 
future,” a source said. 

Continued on page 94 


A Powerful 
Message For 
Cache Conscious 

3880Users. 



Price Comparison 


Upgrade 

Capacity 

EMC List 

IBM List 

Savings with 
EMC 

16MB 

S 48,000 

S 72,000 

$24,000 

32MB 

96,000 

144,000 

48,000 

48MB 

144,000 

216,000 

72,000 


Introducing EMC's 
PowerCache-16 
Cache Storage Upgrades. 

One of the reasons you invested in an IBM 3880 
Model 21 or 23 Storage Director was its caching 
features. 

But with the high cost of IBM cache upgrades, 
configuring enough capacity to make caching an 
effective way to improve DASD subsystem perfor¬ 
mance has been difficult to justify to yourself or to 
your management. 

Finally 3880 Users Can Increase Capacity 
And Decrease Expenses. 

Well all that has changed. Because now there's 
the PowerCache-16 cache storage upgrade from 
EMC Corporation. Priced 33 percent less than 
IBM's comparable upgrade, EMC's PowerCache-16 
gives you an affordable way to increase the cache 
capacity of your Model 21 or 23 Storage Director. 


Your Cost Savings Are Only The Beginning. 

EMC also uses megabit RAM components and 
a newer design for higher reliability. Then we put 
every upgrade through a 100-hour test and bum-in 
procedure that includes qualification in one of our 
3880's prior to shipment to you. And finally we 
back our PowerCache-16 upgrades with a no-cost 
lifetime warranty and choice of service plans. 

And, like the thousands of IBM users who 
already rely on our electronic storage enhancement 
products for their computer systems, you'll also find 
that use of our upgrades has no effect on the level 
of service you receive from IBM. That's IBM's 
published policy. 

Cache In On System Performance. 

To learn more about the first affordable upgrades 
for your 3880 Model 21 or 23 Storage Director 
simply call EMC at 1-800-222-EMC2 (In Mass. 617- 
435-2541), or write EMC Corporation, 171 South 
Street, Hopkinton, MA 01748. We'll answer all your 
questions and put you in touch with the EMC office 
nearest you. 

Call Today: 

1-800-222-EMC2 

In Mass, call 617-655-6600 

In the Toronto area 416-368-4726 
In the Vancouver area 604-662-3911 

IBM is a registered trademark of International Business Machines Corp, 

PowerCache and PowerCache-16 are trademarks of EMC Corporation. 

Copyright 1987 EMC Corporation. 

2» 

§H fm/l I The System Enhancement 
JLj JL W Company 


16 


COMPUTERWORLD 


AUGUST 10,1987 






















"I'm sorry,Hr. btfle+on. 8ub wh«n 
*hey o^ered me my owh subsen p+ioft 
b& Cofl'pvberwM'ld, I -book tke^ob." 










































































NEWS 


PCC approves major AT&T rule change 

Tentative plan would install price ceiling on long-distance services, remove profit cap 


BY MITCH BETTS 

CW STAFF 


WASHINGTON, D.C. — Led by Chair¬ 
man Dennis R. Patrick, the Federal Com¬ 
munications Commission last week voted 
4-0 for a tentative proposal that would 
dramatically change the way the agency 
regulates AT&T’s long-distance services 
and could possibly boost the carrier’s 
profits. 

The so-called “price caps” proposal, 
still subject to many months of public 
comment and FCC deliberation before be¬ 
coming a final regulation, would set price 
ceilings on all AT&T long-distance ser¬ 
vices and remove ceilings on AT&T’s 
profits. 

The new scheme would replace the 
traditional form of utility regulation, 


which limits the company’s rate of return 
and sets fixed prices [CW, July 27]. 

Under Patrick’s proposal, AT&T’s 
earnings could increase with virtually no 
limit, in order to reward the carrier for 
cutting costs. AT&T could raise or lower 
rates for long-haul services at will, as long 
as it does not exceed the price cap, which 
would be adjusted annually. 

Users question price caps 

For AT&T’s largest customers, the key 
issues will be the determination of which 
services get price caps, the reasonable¬ 
ness of the initial price caps and the 
soundness of the factors used to make an¬ 
nual adjustments, according to James S. 
Blaszak, counsel for the Ad Hoc Telecom¬ 
munications Users Committee. 

In previous statements, users groups 


have expressed concern that the first set 
of price caps will be set too high. 

“What the proposal clearly gives 
AT&T is greater flexibility to retain reve¬ 
nue and make more money,” Blaszak said. 
“It’s not clear that they will — it depends 
on the extent to which they can make 
their operations more efficient.” 

Under rate-of-retum regulation, cost¬ 
cutting efforts that push earnings above 
the profit ceiling must be refunded to 
ratepayers. With Patrick’s proposal, 
AT&T could keep some of the earnings 
derived from greater efficiency. 

Wall Street responded favorably to the 
action. AT&T’s stock rose to $32 a share, 
up 25 cents, in very active trading on the 
day of the FCC’s vote. 

The commission said that rate-of-re- 
turn regulation should be replaced be¬ 


cause it has numerous flaws, including 
perverse incentives to inflate and shift 
costs from unregulated business ventures 
to regulated services, since the costs are 
recouped from ratepayers. 

Pricing benefits cited 

“By contrast,” Patrick explained, “price 
caps would appear to reduce the incentive 
to cross-subsidize, might reduce the abili¬ 
ty and incentive to engage in any preda¬ 
tory pricing of competitive services and 
might increase carrier incentives to cut 
costs, innovate and realize efficiencies.” 

In addition, Patrick said price caps 
would protect ratepayers from sharp rate 
hikes. 

The FCC proposal applies to so-called 
dominant carriers in the interstate ser¬ 
vices market, so it could be applied to the 
divested Bell operating companies as well 
as to AT&T. 

However, the FCC said the new regu¬ 
latory regime will first be implemented 
for AT&T and perhaps later for the Bell 
companies. 


Bankamerica cozies up to AI 
to assist lending procedure 


BY CLINTON WILDER 

CW STAFF 


SUNNYVALE, Calif. — As part of its ef¬ 
fort to improve its loan portfolio and re¬ 
cover from massive losses, Bankamerica 
Corp. has turned to an unlikely source: ar¬ 
tificial intelligence. 

The U.S.’s second-largest bank re¬ 
cently invited 93 of its top executives 
from the U.S. and overseas to a series of 
four-day training programs on the com¬ 
mercial lending process. The Executive 
Lending Forum took place at the small 
Sunnyvale headquarters of start-up AI 
software developer Syntelligence, Inc., 
whose Lending Advisor expert system 
was the cornerstone of the training pro¬ 
grams. 

Lewis Coleman, executive vice-presi¬ 
dent of credit for Bankamerica’s world 
banking division, said he chose an expert 
system because of its ability to incorpo¬ 
rate the multiplicity of factors involved in 
approving or rejecting a potential debtor. 
Syntelligence employees programmed six 
actual Bankamerica loan situations into 
the Lending Advisor, and bank executives 
ran the expert system on IBM 3270 Per¬ 
sonal Computers linked to Syntelligence’s 
IBM 4381 mainframe. 

“An AI system allows you to be able to 
run lots of variables in a much more effi¬ 
cient way and get a much better feel of the 
sensitivity of various credit situations,” 
Coleman said. 

Cooperative development effort 

Introduced in late 1986, the Lending Ad¬ 
visor analyzes an array of loan-decision 
variables to assist loan and credit advisers 
with credit evaluation. Syntelligence de¬ 
veloped the product in conjunction with 
loan officers at Wells Fargo Bank NA in 
San Francisco and Winston-Salem, N.C.- 
based First Wachovia Corp. Both banks 
recently installed a new release of the 
product. 

Coleman was familiar with the prod¬ 
uct, as a former executive with Wells Far¬ 
go during the development effort with 


Syntelligence. To run the Bankamerica 
Executive Lending Forum, Coleman 
called on Tom Hofstedt, a Redwood City, 
Calif.-based bank credit consultant and 
former professor at Stanford University 
Business School. 

“I had thought that expert systems 
were blue-sky technology, a long way 
off,” Hofstedt said. “But the system 
forced the bankers to ask the right ques¬ 
tions. The bank views its problems, to 
some extent, as related to bad decisions. 
Part of the solution to that lies in better 
analysis, and some of it lies in technol¬ 
ogy.” 

Forum participants attended daytime 
seminars at the Sunnyvale Sheraton, then 
ran the software on Syntelligence com¬ 
puters after regular business hours. Syn¬ 
telligence did not charge a fee for the 
seminars but hopes to license the Lending 
Advisor to Bankamerica in the future, ac¬ 
cording to Syntelligence President Shel¬ 
don Breiner. 

‘Rapid-fire language course’ 

“Very few of these people were computer 
literate except for some PC spreadsheet 
experience,” Breiner said. “They did not 
come here to play golf. The goal was for 
them to look at the Bankamerica loans in 
ways that they hadn’t before. It was like 
getting a rapid-fire language course.” 

Bankamerica’s Coleman said he hopes 
the Executive Lending Forum experience 
will help overcome some suspicions about 
AI technology within the bank. 

“In the loan business, you’re making a 
decision about future cash flows, and 
there is no absolute right answer,” he 
said. “An awful lot of people have made 
their careers on the value of their own 
judgment, and they’re reluctant to deal 
with a system that might subtract from 
that value. But that comes from people 
who don’t understand how the system 
works. Good analysis provides the frame¬ 
work for good judgment.” 

Although many leading banks are de¬ 
veloping or using expert systems inter¬ 
nally, Syntelligence’s Lending Advisor is 


one of only a handful of commercially 
available products, said AI consultant 
Harvey Newquist of DM Data in Scotts¬ 
dale, Ariz. But, he said, commercial lend¬ 
ing may be ripe for such a product. 

“The industry shouldn’t take this the 
wrong way, but the idea of a hamburger 
university like McDonald’s is beginning to 
be true of the banking industry,” New¬ 
quist said. 

“You’d like to establish a base level of 


performance, so something like an expert 
system can help do that,” he added. 

In a separate announcement, Syntelli¬ 
gence introduced a release of its expert 
system for the property/casualty insur¬ 
ance industry. Release 2.0 of the Under¬ 
writing Advisor is said to contain im¬ 
proved communications interfaces to 
accept electronic transfers of data from a 
user’s other mainframe software applica¬ 
tions. 


OUTRAGEOUS 
OFFEIH 


A FREE 


We wouldn’t make this outrageous 
offer if we thought we’d have to make 
good on it. That’s how reliable Fujitsu 
modems are. 

But if the outrageous should happen 
and your Fujitsu modem fails during the 
first year, we’ll give you another 
modem. For free. And we’ll fix 
the first one. Also for free. 

The L-series comes with 
speeds of 2400, 4800, 9600, 

14,400 and 19,200 bps. They’re 
front-panel programmable and 
completely self-diagnostic. Our economical 
EZ series is easily convertible from stand-alone to 
rack card. This limited offer is only open to new purchases of our 
L and EZ modems from an authorized Fujitsu America distributor 
and is subject to the terms of our modem insurance policy. 

For the name of a distributor near you, call 800-422 
in California, 408-434-0460. 

The most outrageous 
guarantee in the 
modem market— 

Fujitsu modem 
insurance. 




FUJITSU AMERICA / 

DATA COMMUNICATIONS / £ 

/ 





/ 


/ 


4 & 


AUGUST 10,1987 


COMPUTERWORLD 


17 



















NEWS 


PC additions keep Tandy in competitive field 


BY ALAN ALPER 

CW STAFF 


NEW YORK — Seeking to solidify its po¬ 
sition as a leading alternative to IBM in 
the microcomputer industry, Tandy 
Corp. last week unveiled four IBM Per¬ 
sonal Computer-compatible systems 
spanning the performance spectrum. 

At a press conference here, the Fort 
Worth, Texas, firm brought out its first 
Intel Corp. 80386-based microcomputer, 
its initial PC-compatible laptop and an In¬ 
tel 80286-based version of its Model 
1000. 

These micros continue Tandy’s strate¬ 


gy of remaining compatible with existing 
Microsoft Corp. MS-DOS standards while 
providing a vechicle — via the 286- and 
386-based PCs — to eventually run appli¬ 
cations that take advantage of the multi¬ 
tasking capabilities of OS/2, the next-gen¬ 
eration operating system jointly 
developed by IBM and Microsoft. Tandy 
said it will continue to study the Micro 
Channel architecture used in IBM’s Per¬ 
sonal System/2 line and will only provide 
compatible products if market require¬ 
ments are identified. 

Tandy said it will also continue to aim 
its efforts primarily at small to medium- 
size businesses and home users, although 


the company remains committed to its re¬ 
cently created outbound sales force, 
whose charter is to increase penetration 
of larger corporations. 

Citing industry research, John Roach, 
Tandy’s chairman and president, said ap¬ 
proximately 3% to 4% of the country’s 
largest corporations are Tandy custom¬ 
ers. That figure, he conceded, was not up 
to initial expectations. 

Analysts said last week that the Tandy 
PCs round out the firm’s product line, of¬ 
fering better performance at aggressive 
price points. The products could enhance 
the company’s attractiveness to large 
corporate accounts, but Tandy needs to 


learn how to sell and service major corpo¬ 
rations and reduce overlap between its 
national and local sales forces before it can 
hope to bolster its position, analysts said. 

The firm’s 386-based micro, with a 
base price of $2,599, will be intriguing to 
some large companies with budgetary re¬ 
strictions, but aggressive pricing is not al¬ 
ways sufficient to attract large corporate 
users, noted Tom Roberts, an analyst 
with International Data Corp. in Framing¬ 
ham, Mass. “It’s still a Tandy or Radio 
Shack machine, which has little status in 
large corporations,” he said. 

Tandy’s top-of-the-line Model 4000 
comes standard with one 3V2-in. 1.44M- 
byte floppy disk drive and a 386 micro¬ 
processor running at 16 MHz. The Model 
4000’s bus structure is compatible with 
IBM’s PC XT and AT and offers two 8-bit 
expansion slots and six 16-bit slots. It will 
operate as a stand-alone processor or a 
file server on a PC network and support 
MS-DOS 3.3, OS/2 and AT&T’s Unix 
System V, Release 3. 

With a 20M-byte drive, the Model 
4000 is priced at $3,499. Adding a 40M- 
byte drive boosts the price to $4,299. In 
contrast, IBM’s Model 80-041 lists for 
$6,995, and Compaq Computer Corp.’s 
Model 40 costs $6,499. 

Laptop debut boasts clarity 

Tandy’s first PC-compatible laptop — the 
1400 LT — features a backlit, super¬ 
twist LCD, which is said to provide great¬ 
er viewing clarity. Priced at $1,599, the 
Intel 8088-based portable features 768K 
bytes of random-access memory, dual 
720K-byte 3'/ 2 -in. floppy disk drives, a 
76-key keyboard with 12 function keys 
and a serial and a parallel interface. The 
unit includes a 12V battery pack with a 
life of four hours and an AC adapter. An 
optional spare battery pack is available for 
$79.95, the company said. 

The high-end 286-based Model 1000 
— the 1000 TX — is priced at $1,119. 
The 1000 TX offers 640K bytes of inter¬ 
nal storage, expandable to 768K bytes; a 
single 720K-byte 3V2-in. floppy disk 
drive; five expansion slots; and MS-DOS 
3.2. The machine comes bundled with 
Personal Deskmate 2, Tandy’s second- 
generation graphics-oriented user inter¬ 
face that uses Microsoft Windows con¬ 
ventions and features integrated 
applications. 

Other announcements by Tandy in¬ 
cluded the following: 

• Two versions of its Model 3000. Tandy 
increased the clock speed of its original 
Model 3000 to 12 MHz and reduced the 
price by $200 from $1,999. The 8-MHz 
Model 3000 HL was reduced in price by 
$200 to $1,499, making it Tandy’s lowest 
cost “OS/2-ready” computer, the firm 
noted. 

• A version of the Deskmate integrated 
software package for computing profes¬ 
sionals using any of Tandy’s PC-compati¬ 
ble systems. Professional Deskmate is 
priced at $149.95. Through Desklink fa¬ 
cilities, users can share applications such 
as electronic mail or phone listings. Users 
can exchange data via RS-232 intercon¬ 
nection, a 3Com Corp. network or 
Tandy’s Tandylink twisted-pair network. 

• The $699 Model 1000 HX, which fea¬ 
tures MS-DOS 2.11 loaded into read-only 
memory and includes a single 720K-byte 
3 Win. floppy disk drive. 

All the Tandy products are currently 
available except the Model 3000s, which 
will be available in the fourth quarter, the 
company said. 



LEAVE DEVELOPMENT TROUBLES BEHIND 

With Realia's development tools, you can build efficient mainframe applications 
right on your PC. Every stage of development gets easier, whether you’re 
maintaining an existing application or creating a new one. 

• Realia COBOL, the fastest PC COBOL compiler, produces the most efficient 
executable programs. 

• REALCICS® lets you develop and run mainframe CICS programs on the PC. 

• RealDBUG offers interactive, source-level debugging better than any 
mainframe tool. 

Choose Realia, and your applications backlog can soon be just a memory. 

REAUA 

10 South Riverside Plaza, Chicago, IL 60606 • (312) 346-0642 • Ttelex 332979 


18 


COMPUTERWORLD 


AUGUST 10,1987 


























































What can you expect from 
the new LaserJet Series II Printer? 




T 



Everything. 

Because the LaserJet Series II Printer 
from Hewlett-Packard is the 

product of experience. It’s a 
second generation 
printer from the com¬ 
pany with the world’s 
largest installed base 
of laser printers. 

Whatever your company’s needs, the 
LaserJet Series II will deliver the perfor¬ 
mance you expect, at up to 8 pages/ 
minute. 

Thke a simple memo like the Soup 
letter we created with Microsoft Word. As 
you can see, you can print in a variety of 
formats and type styles with our wide 
selection of LaserJet fonts. 

Or you can create a sophisticated 
combination of text and graphics. With 
additional plug-in memory, you can also 
produce full-page 300 dpi graphics, like 


our Nuts form shown below Jb do this, 
we used HP’s new ScanJet desktop scan¬ 
ner, Microsoft Windows and Pagemaker® 
from Aldus. 

With support by more than 500 of the 
most popular software packages, the 
LaserJet Series II Printer can produce 
whatever type of business document you 
need. And LaserJet Series n works with 
all popular PCs so it can easily be inte¬ 
grated into your existing system. 

In fact, only the price is unexpected 
—starting as low as $2,595* 

For the authorized dealer nearest you, 
call us at 1800 367-4772, Ext. 900A. 

HEWLETT 
PACKARD 

Business Computing Systems 

Microsoft is a registered trademark of Microsoft Corp. Pagemaker is a 
U S registered trademark of Aldus Corporation. 

‘Suggested U S. list price. © 1987 Hewlett-Packard Co.. PE12701 




f*J ^ e *uxe Assort, 


Preside^ 

ESS*'"- 

August 1. x9?n 

he \«you; 

,ecUOOS^ th ev^ 


Peanut 

A tasty, 
unique as- 
SOrl ment from 


SSmss 


aTe nub\^' n V'l*ese 

>aie „ $uoo.c 

sLioo' 

$2,600, 

$4,800 

$8J00’ < S) $U° ( 

*9 300, 0 W 


y a zeinut 

cream ^° kies ' ice 
’ < ? ocol ate, 

ta «abenil e ,^ n8ver 


Almond 

rh fV>e Popular an 
re versatile 
M * ab ' e wh °lo, 
° r chopped xS 

ie * re equally 
at home in J ’ fi 
’ n ’ s favorite 
recipes. S'V 


1982 

1988 

1989 

1990 

1991 

^“•^”. l ° c '° sebv rfSOtWSS* 

peI “ 

«°*jiu seU- l<Cup 0 r ^ 0 f the A*® 1 ’ 

sOUP aed Reading ^ lhe habhso 

uecornmend^ ^scusse 5 


fecan ^ 

7^ great ■ 

'host discrlmln a tj r 
Southern tas 


estnut 

j f'*p°ns inZ°y W 
sea s°"a/consamp, (o , 


lZ bQPB ^r mkl 

ee t or savory dishes. 























When The Johns Hopkins University decided to launch an ambitious fund-raising campaign, 
its Development and Alumni Services Department decided to do something even bolder—break 
away from the administration’s traditional mainframe environment. And go with a system from Digital. 

“We needed control of our own priorities” says Mel Vogelsang, Director of Development and 
Alumni Services. “Our old system was too difficult to access. It could never have handled 
the new 7 demands.” 

Digital’s open architecture made it easy. Now they can quickly move up to more powerful, 
faster processors. And still keep the same software and operating system. What’s more, their new 
system can run all sorts of software. From Digital’s to a third party’s to Hopkins’ own. 

Digital service even helps with customization of that software. Not to mention lots of upgrades. 
“The demands of my users are more insatiable than ever: more applications, faster 



“A computing 
architecture that raised 
some eyebrows when it 
helped Johns Hopkins raise 
a few million dollars.” 


output” Vogelsang remarks. “I’m constantly faced with growth. And Digital’s open architecture lets 
me add on whatever I need.” 

How successful is the department? According to Vogelsang, “We’ve cut response time from 
three weeks to three days. And when needed, to three hours. In fact, we’ve tripled the we>rk processed 
Now, we have time to branch out into event management, alumni networking. Even a little PR. 

“I feel like we’ve become real contenders in the very competitive world of fund-raising.” 

To find out how we can give you a competitive edge, write: 

Digital Equipment Corporation, 200 Baker Avenue, West Concord, 

MA 01742. Or call your local sales office. 


'A 1UI IVi lUJOlllg. 

mmm 


© Digital Equipment Corporation, 1987. The Digital logo is a trademark ofDigital Equipment Corporation. 








VIEWPOINT 


EDITORIAL 

Who’s the boss? 


S teve Stanton calls them the “Johns and 
Marys.” 

We all know them. They’re the people 
in the various discrete departments in or¬ 
ganizations — marketing, sales, engineering, 
etc. — who started out as informal advisers to 
personal computer users years ago and eventu¬ 
ally evolved into the micro gurus of today. They 
are the driving force behind micro purchase and 
implementation strategies, Stanton holds. 

Down the hall from Stanton at the Index 
Group, Inc., a widely respected Cambridge, 
Mass.-based MIS consultancy, is Tom Daven¬ 
port, research director and former end-user 
computing manager at Harvard University. 

Davenport sees the situation differently, with 
MIS calling the shots and — rightfully so, he 
says — driving corporate micro strategies. 

Each consultant can point to numerous exam¬ 
ples in the real world to support his viewpoint. 
And each is correct, because the real world to¬ 
day is a mishmash of differing micro implementa¬ 
tion strategies. And this begs the vital question, 
Which strategy is the best? Should MIS assert it¬ 
self in the micro area to the extent it has with 
larger systems? Or is it a better idea to leave the 
development of micro strategies to John and 
Mary? 

One thing is clear: MIS is increasingly cited as 
the department with primary responsibility for 
implementing micro strategies and specifying 
PC purchase plans. A survey earlier this year of 
several hundred Computerworld readers 
showed MIS holding this primary responsibility 
in seven out of 10 cases. This data is fully sup¬ 
ported in a soon-to-be-released independent sur¬ 
vey of 1,000 medium-size and large sites. 

So while a trend is apparent, the question still 
remains as to whether the trend is a desirable 
one. Our feeling is that it is not only desirable but 
also essential to the long-term viability of infor¬ 
mation systems strategies. 

Furthermore, it seems that this desirability is 
being recognized by the Johns and Marys, as for¬ 
mer micro managers are steadily moving into 
mainstream MIS operations in many organiza¬ 
tions. Such managers say they gain more respect 
in doing so, and they certainly position them¬ 
selves closer to the seats of corporate power, 
since information systems are rapidly being ab¬ 
sorbed into the organization infrastructure. 

A similar potentially contentious situation is 
brewing between MIS and communications pro¬ 
fessionals. As greater proportions of information 
outlays fund expanded data and telecommunica¬ 
tions operations, telecommunications managers 
are seeking greater influence and independence 
from their MIS bosses. 

What MIS needs to do is strike a fine balance 
between the need to grant greater autonomy to 
subdepartments and the need to hold the infor¬ 
mation structure together with a skillfully craft¬ 
ed, integrated strategy. This will increasingly 
require the compromising skills of Henry Clay, 
the managerial acumen of Lee Iacocca and the 
visionary abilities of Jeanne Dixon. Any takers? 



TeLL THEM I'LL BETHEfiE 
fo SOON 45 IOW. 


LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 


Employee hunting 

This is an open letter to those 
who need programmers. 

You will never find the person 
you are looking for if you rely on 
your personnel department to 
screen applications. I know be¬ 
cause, after two months and 50 
applications, I have yet to talk to 
a real computer person. 

Obviously, I have been going 
about my job search in the wrong 
way. Actually, it has been sever¬ 
al wrong ways. But what do you 
really want — an expert on job 
hunting or an expert program¬ 
mer? 

I have some suggestions to 
protect your own interests. 
First, do not just give your per¬ 
sonnel department a list of lan¬ 
guages and operating systems 
unless you are really looking for 
a new resident guru. 

Applications programming 
requires knowledge of an editor, 
a language and your locally de¬ 
fined methods of compiling, link¬ 
ing and running the program. 
Everything else about your pro¬ 
grammer/analyst’s job depends 
on your applications, your busi¬ 
ness and your local practices. 
Fitting into them is the hard 
thing to learn and should top 
even the programming language 
in evaluating experienced candi¬ 
dates. 

Second, give your personnel 
department a short form letter 
to accompany the standard re¬ 
ply. Many resumes will be reject¬ 
ed because personnel employees 
cannot make sense of them or 
see how their contents apply to 
the available job. That may mean 
the applicant cannot write a re¬ 
sume or that his experience is 
unfamiliar to those in personnel. 
Neither should be a surprise, and 
neither should disqualify him 
from your search. 


Why not give him your selec¬ 
tion criteria and a structure 
within which to discuss himself? 
Then you can be confident that 
you will really learn how well he 
fits the job. 

Finally, what you should be 
looking for is a package of pro¬ 
cessing power and understand¬ 
ing that will let you implement 
the ideal employee. You will 
have to program him to some ex¬ 
tent. 

Keep in mind that the easiest 
reason for the personnel depart¬ 
ment to reject him will be the 
programmer’s ignorance of the 
things that are the easiest for 
him to learn. Your risk is not that 
you will not get good candidates, 
but that you will miss the best. 

Donald H. Sweezy 
Raleigh, N.C. 

This week 
in history 

Aug. 8,1977 

If programmer productivity 
remains at its current snail’s 
pace of 3% a year, automated 
information processing will 
become the most labor-inten¬ 
sive industry outside of agri¬ 
culture by 1985, warns Rich¬ 
ard I. Tanaka, president of 
the International Federation 
for Information Processing. 

Aug. 9,1982 

The Stevens Institute of 
Technology in Hoboken, N.J., 
has announced that freshmen 
entering the school’s comput¬ 
er science, systems planning 
or management programs 
will be required to own an 
Atari 800 personal computer 
system. 


Relational notes 

John Blumberg makes some in¬ 
consistent remarks in his article 
concerning the relational model, 
the Pick system and miscella¬ 
neous data base management 
systems [CW, July 6]. 

Two such remarks are the fol¬ 
lowing: 

• “The Pick system ... became 
commercially available in 
1974.” 

• “Pick’s relational data base 
predates the published works of 
Edward Codd. . .” 

Blumberg clearly made an in¬ 
correct guess as to my first 
name, which is Edgar. My first 
technical papers on the relation¬ 
al model were the following: 

• “Derivability, redundancy and 
consistency of relations stored in 
large data banks,” IBM Re¬ 
search Report RJ599, Aug. 19, 
1969. This report was unclassi¬ 
fied and therefore readily avail¬ 
able to the public. 

• “A relational model of data for 
large shared data banks,” the 
Communications of the ACM, 
Vol. 13, No. 6, June 1970. 

Of course, I have published 
numerous others. I would like to 
challenge Blumberg to answer 
publicly the following questions: 

• What were the papers you or 
your colleagues published prior 
to August 1969 that defined the 
relational model or the approach 
based on it? 

• Where were you and your col¬ 
leagues during the data base 
management wars of the 1970s? 
I did not see you in the trenches. 

I have yet to see any sign of 
any Pick developers putting 
their reputations on the line by 
publishing technical papers con¬ 
cerning the relational model. 

E. F. Codd 
The Relational Institute 
San Jose, Calif. 


22 


COMPUTERWORLD 


AUGUST 10,1987 




































VIEWPOINT 


Cold shoulder to network integration 

Expense, uncertainty and absence of common system environments leave field untapped 


FREDERIC WITHINGTON 

For a decade, vendors 
have been telling users to 
integrate their communi¬ 
cations networks — to 
W combine data with voice 
and, where relevant, im¬ 
age transmission, or at least combine all 
data networks into one. 

A flood of products has been intro¬ 
duced to support network integration — 
protocol converters, voice/data private 
branch exchanges (PBX), satellite earth 
stations, integrated workstations, video/ 
audio teleconference equipment and the 
like. And for a decade, users have greeted 
these network integration products with 
a yawn, to the general detriment of the in¬ 
dustry’s growth rate. 

The following are three examples of 
organizations that considered integrating 
networks — and decided not to. 

One of the country’s largest insurance 
companies is composed of divisions that 
share some resources, including commu¬ 
nications facilities and a computer center. 
However, each division created its own 
applications, which led to the use of differ¬ 
ing terminals and protocols and therefore 
to multiple communications networks 
The manager of central facilities wants 
the divisions to convert to common proto¬ 
cols so a single, integrated network can be 
used. The divisions, comparing the cost 
and inconvenience of changing software 
with the benefits, have so far refused. 

A government agency considered in¬ 
stalling a voice/data PBX to handle the 
traffic of its voice, word processing and 
data terminal networks. The vendors of 


A 30-year veteran of the computer industry, With- 
ington was a vice-president of Arthur D. Little, Inc. 
and is now an independent consultant. He has writ¬ 
ten four books and more than 60 articles and papers. 


READER’S PLATFORM 

DENNIS CRANE 


C. J. Date’s article, “Twelve rules for a 
distributed data base” [CW, June 8], pre¬ 
sents an elaborate analysis of require¬ 
ments for an ultimately flexible imple¬ 
mentation of a distributed system. It 
challenges designers and implementors to 
press for a degree of integration, trans¬ 
parency and independence (hardware, 
networking and operating system) that is 
beyond practicality in today’s world. 

I would have appreciated an equally 
thorough review of the circumstances and 
business justifications for such a robust 
implementation of a distributed data base. 
What real-world situations actually call 
for such an architecture? How would the 
system compare on a benefit/cost basis 
when due consideration is given to or¬ 
chestrating the degree of independence 
called for in the article? 

The truly distributed data base, as pro- 


Crane is the manager for the Mountain States re¬ 
gion of GE Information Services, a division of Gener¬ 
al Electric Co., in Englewood, Colo. 


processors and terminals could not sup¬ 
port multimedia service, however, and 
end users voted to put up with the incon¬ 
venience of multiple terminals rather 
than learn new systems. So larger ver¬ 
sions of the separate systems were in¬ 
stalled instead of an integrated one. 

Two manufacturers of medical sup¬ 
plies merged. Each had an order entry 
network for salesmen and customers to 
use. They consid¬ 
ered integrating the 
networks but found 
the major saving 
could be made just 
by installing multi¬ 
plexers that enabled 
the networks to 
share leased com¬ 
munications lines. 

To go further would 
have meant chang¬ 
ing software, behav¬ 
ior patterns and 
large numbers of 
terminals for little 
further gain. 

Some of the fol¬ 
lowing novel ser¬ 
vices were supposed 
to lead to integration of networks but 
have not done so: 

• Shared data services were going to in¬ 
duce both business people and consumers 
to use telephone lines for data inquiries 
and electronic mail, as well as for voice. 
After at least 10 years, most providers, 
except those owning really valuable data, 
are languishing, and the use of dial-up mo¬ 
dems is pretty well restricted to profes¬ 
sional personal computer users. 

• Teleconferencing was going to create 
big new markets for multimedia telecon¬ 
ference room equipment and satellite 
earth stations. Instead, what teleconfer¬ 
encing there is either uses entertainment 


posed by Date, may be analogous to a 
town deciding that the best way to com¬ 
plement an old library would be to catalog 
and inventory all the books that each of 
the town’s residents maintain at home 
and then design a scheme by which any 
resident could conveniently access, if and 
when interested, all of this reading mate¬ 
rial. 

Obviously, the town would save the 
cost of building a new central library, and 
people would not have to learn the Dewey 
decimal system or travel downtown to 
get a book. 

How practical is it? 

Perhaps it would be easier to borrow the 
book from a neighbor. But what if the 
neighbor is away for the week? And how 
practical is it to ask that everyone orga¬ 
nize and catalog the books in their home 
libraries in the same manner, on the off 
chance that a fellow townsman might 
wish to locate and borrow one? And who 
will be responsible for ongoing compli¬ 
ance with the cataloging scheme, assum¬ 
ing it can be agreed to in the first place? 

Practically speaking, most business ap¬ 
plications calling for distributed data 


TV facilities or is restricted to voice and 
low-rate freeze-frame images. 

• Electronic Data Interchange was (and 
still is, enthusiasts say) going to cause 
companies in many industries to integrate 
their data networks. This integration has 
happened only in industries that already 
shared data definitions and high levels of 
transaction interchange. Others are tan¬ 
gled up in standards squabbles and cost- 


justification studies that persistently 
come out negatively. 

• Desktop publishing is the latest devel¬ 
opment supposed to lead to the integra¬ 
tion of office and data networks. Howev¬ 
er, most installations are turning out to 
include only a few workstations, a shared 
file and a local laser printer. 

Keeping progress at a minimum 

What’s held up progress? Four factors, 
apparently. First, the absence of common 
system environments in the networks to 
be integrated. This one the vendors ac¬ 
knowledge: Diverse communications pro¬ 
tocols, system programs and data de¬ 


bases are likely to be served by a hybrid 
architecture with the following character¬ 
istics: 

• Data created and used most frequently 
by a certain user will be retained locally. 

• Data created by one person and fre¬ 
quently accessed by many others can be 
stored centrally. 

• Convenient provisions exist for users 
with disparate hardware and software to 
access the centrally stored information. 

• Procedures are established to request 
updates to centrally stored information 
and request data that might be retained 
locally. Procedures could include indexing 
or periodic update schedules. 

Implementing such a system requires 
recognition and acceptance of the diversi¬ 
ty of the hardware, software and 
networking likely to prevail in the busi¬ 
ness environment, particularly when 
originators and users of the data belong to 
different business entities. 

I applaud Date’s well-presented guide¬ 
lines and encourage designers to consider 
some of these concepts, along with the 
concept of a hybrid data base, when con¬ 
structing actual systems to address most 
real-world requirements. 


ments make integration difficult. 

This lack is slowly being remedied. 
Vendors are making progress in develop¬ 
ing hybrid systems; de facto (and de jure) 
standards are emerging at a reasonable 
rate, and users are slowly squeezing out 
off-standard networks. More network in¬ 
tegration will doubtless result, but not as 
much as the vendors hope because of the 
remaining three factors. 

Second, the absence of common inter¬ 
est among users. Buyers and sellers of 
products must communicate information 
related to orders, and some forecasters 
say many of them will soon be doing this 
network to network. But in today’s world, 
such communica¬ 
tions are usually re¬ 
viewed by a person 
who takes some ac¬ 
tion, enters the re¬ 
sult into a data pro¬ 
cessing system and 
simply files the origi¬ 
nal communication. 
There is rarely a 
common interest in 
interconnected data 
networks. Even 
within an organiza¬ 
tion, departments 
talk mostly to them¬ 
selves. When mar¬ 
keting, manufactur¬ 
ing and finance 
departments talk to 
one another, it is in terms of finished 
transactions in relatively low volume or 
orally. When they talk to top manage¬ 
ment, it is in terms of financial summaries 
or, again, orally. 

It may be worthwhile to interconnect 
departmental networks to speed up low- 
volume communications, but there is 
rarely enough common traffic or common 
site coverage to justify full integration. 

Third, an inadequate financial benefit. 
The main cost offset by integrating net¬ 
works is communication line cost. But a 
combination of multiplexers and competi¬ 
tion has brought communication line 
costs down. And the cost of integration, 
which usually requires rewriting software 
and converting files to a standard, is often 
high. Many user organizations guiltily add 
up the costs of their redundant networks, 
compare this to the cost of network inte¬ 
gration and are surprised to find that inte¬ 
gration does not pay. 

Fourth, resistance to behavior change. 
This intangible factor is often enough to 
offset any cost reduction that survived 
the justification study. People’s communi¬ 
cation facilities become part of the way 
they do business. They turn to the tele¬ 
phone, the data terminal or the worksta¬ 
tion for rapid service, expecting to use the 
operating procedures that have become 
instinctive with practice. 

If new operating procedures must be 
learned, there is naturally resistance and 
lowered productivity until they become 
instinctive. Integrated, multimedia net¬ 
works necessarily involve learning new 
operating procedures, so user resistance 
to them is to be expected. 

The bottom line is simple. Don’t inte¬ 
grate any networks until you’re satisfied 
you have common system environments, 
the costs are justified, the network users 
have enough interest to make this project 
worthwhile and users will accept the be¬ 
havior change. If you’re satisfied, go 
ahead, and more power to you. If you’re 
not, you’re in good company — that of 
most systems managers in the country. 


Grafting a hybrid distributed data base 



TOM LULEVITCH 



TOM LULEVITCH 


AUGUST 10,1987 


COMPUTERWORLD 


23 
























Soon there will be only two 
kinds of software developers. 

Those up to speed on 
Microsoft® Operating System/2. 

And those hying to catch up. 

To help you to be one of 
the first kind, we’ve put together 
a special beta-release software 
development kit 

Here’s what you get: 

MS R OS/2, including the 
Windows presentation manager/ 

A Microsoft C Compiler 
and Microsoft Macro Assembler for MS OS/2 
The MS OS/2 LAN Manager/ 

Extensive documentation. 


Microsoft 

OSI2 


TM 


Continual updates of all the 
components, right up to final 
release date. 

A year’s subscription to a 
special MS OS/2 DIAL account 
(an online support and product 
information link to Microsoft). 

Introductory video cassettes 
containing important informa¬ 
tion necessary to get started. 

And, on a strictly first-come- 
first-served basis, a limited num¬ 
ber of people wall get a seat at one 
of our intensive training conferences in LA or Dallas. 
The cost of all this is $3000/* ^ 

The opportunities, endless. IvllCfOSOtt 


To obtain your information packet and order form, call: 

800 426-9400 

Training conferences: LA, September 21-24. Dallas, October 20-23. 

*Wmdows presentation manager and LAN Manager reference materials are included. The actual software will be shipped as free updates. 
**Companies ordering more than three may purchase subsequent kits for $1500 each, excluding DIAL subscription and conference seats. 
Microsoft, MS and the Microsoft logo are registered trademarks of Microsoft Corporation. 




SOFTWARE & SERVICES 


SOFT 

TALK 


Mitch Betts 


Information center role changes 

Hospital finds it must support applications written by end users 


Pentagon 
gets personal 

Finally, finally, the Pentagon is 
beginning to see the wisdom of 
considering the human factor 
when it designs weapons sys¬ 
tems. 

The most important benefit 
of this, of course, is to make it 
possible for real soldiers to suc¬ 
cessfully use today’s high-priced 
high-tech weapons. But this 
welcome news also has an impor¬ 
tant side benefit: Government- 
funded research in human fac¬ 
tors provides lessons in 
software design that should be 
just as useful to the private sec¬ 
tor. 

We’ve all read horror stories 
about “smart weapons” bought 
by the Pentagon for millions of 
dollars, whereupon the Penta¬ 
gon finds out those weapons 
are virtually impossible for a sol¬ 
dier to use in battle. It may be a 
fighter jet with too many control 
switches, a missile that re¬ 
quires 18 steps to aim and fire or 
a tank with hatches so small 
that soldiers in winter gear can’t 
climb in. With computer sys¬ 
tems such as those found in jet 
cockpits, there are questions 
about whether the pilot can see 
all the screens and whether the 
system is providing too much in¬ 
formation for the pilot to han¬ 
dle. 

This is where the study of 
human factors — the capabilities 
and limitations of humans, rela¬ 
tive to the systems they operate 
— comes in. 

At long last, the Department 
of Defense is starting to consider 
human factors in the early 

Continued on page 26 


BY ROSEMARY HAMILTON 

CW STAFF 


COLUMBUS, Ohio — As infor¬ 
mation center director at Chil¬ 
dren’s Hospital here, Paul Jacob¬ 
son was recently presented with 
a patient information manage¬ 
ment program that had been 
written by an end user. 

Jacobson had to figure out 
how much responsibility to as¬ 
sume for this work, a challenge 
that was a far cry from his job of 
two years ago — teaching the 
basics of word processing and 
spreadsheets to uninitiated end 
users. 

“This is a nonprofessional de¬ 
veloper developing a critical ap¬ 
plication. It’s spaghetti code, and 
it isn’t documented. But she 
wrote it, and it works. My con¬ 
cern is how we will support this 
effort,” he says. 


BY CHARLES BABCOCK 

CW STAFF 


TORONTO — A job scheduling 
package that users said offers 
more control over scheduling op¬ 
tions is being pushed by a young 
Canadian firm to compete with 
the dominant products from 
Computer Associates Interna¬ 
tional, Inc. and the former Uccel 
Corp. 

Cybermation, a 6-year-old 
company in the Toronto suburb 
of Markham, is offering Release 
3.5 of Execution Scheduling Pro¬ 
cessor (ESP), a $40,000 combi¬ 
nation of two predecessor prod¬ 
ucts: Dependent Job Control and 
Job Scheduling System. 



Paul Jacobson 


Like many information cen¬ 
ters, the one at Children’s Hospi¬ 
tal is struggling through a transi¬ 
tional period. Having achieved 
its original goal of promoting 
computer literacy among the 
hospital’s employees, the center 
is now redefining itself in a world 
of increasingly sophisticated us- 


Both products are used under 
IBM’s MVS operating system, 
with the Job Scheduling System 
working in conjunction with 
IBM’s TSO or with Applied Data 
Research, Inc.’s Roscoe. ESP 
was designed to work with 
IBM’s JES2 or JES3 job entry 
environments. 

Cutting the overhead 

The Dependent Job Control 
component emulates the depen¬ 
dent job capabilities of JES3 for a 
JES2 shop, noted user Terry 
Burr, senior software consultant 
for Canada Systems Group, a 
service bureau with three data 
processing centers. Burr said his 
shop did not want all the over- 


ers, some of whom have pro¬ 
duced finished applications. Ja¬ 
cobson says this process is 
difficult because there is no 
clearly defined next step for the 
information center. 

“We’ve gone from relatively 
simple, stand-alone applications 
aimed at personal productivity to 
the need for complex ones aimed 
at work groups and departmen¬ 
tal areas,” he says. 

This change has raised the 
question of how much of a role 
the information center should 
play in supporting more sophisti¬ 
cated users, Jacobson says. 

“The traditional support or¬ 
ganization for simple, single- 
user applications will have trou¬ 
ble handling the more soph¬ 
isticated departmental issues,” 
he adds. 

The need for departmental 
Continued on page 29 


head of JES3 but needed the job 
dependency capability and found 
it through the Cybermation 
product. 

After rejecting IBM’s Change 
Job Scheduler, “We were get¬ 
ting ready to write our own de¬ 
pendent job control program,” 
when the firm learned of ESP, 
Burr recounted. 

An ESP user in Greensboro, 
N.C., who asked not to be identi¬ 
fied, praised the job scheduler 
component. He said he was able 
to train users in a 10-minute 
telephone conversation to define 
tasks and follow the procedures 
for executing those tasks. 

“It’s quite easy to assign a 
user to ESP. ... Users identify 
their own needs and get on board 
very, very quickly,” he said. 

Whether these features will 
allow ESP to enlarge its small in¬ 
stalled base of 60 licenses re- 
Continued on page27 


Manager 
displays 
10 screens 

BY ROSEMARY HAMILTON 

CW STAFF 


RESTON, Va. — Software AG 
of North America, Inc. is set to 
introduce today a session man¬ 
ager with a windowing facility 
that the firm said will allow users 
to display up to 10 IBM VTAM 
applications simultaneously. 

Net-Pass, which was de¬ 
signed for the IBM MVS, 
DOS/VSE and VSl environ¬ 
ments, is said to save users up to 
10% of CPU resources by elimi¬ 
nating the need to log on and off 
as they move from one VTAM 
application to another. 

A one-time license fee for 
DOS environments is $15,000. 
An MVS version costs $25,000, 
and a VSl version has a $20,000 
fee. The one-time fee includes 
the maintenance charge for one 
year. Subsequent maintenance 
charges are 15% of the current 
license fee. 

The session manager has also 
been designed to work with Soft¬ 
ware AG’s applications manag¬ 
er, Com-Plete. Users can run 
both products concurrently and 
can switch between the two with 
a single keystroke, company 
spokesmen said. 

The windowing facility also 
Continued on page 29 

Inside 

• SSPS system ready to run 
on 9370. Page 26. 

• CASE tool maker to offer 
interface to Pansophic’s Tel- 
on. Page 29. 

• Libra adds construction 
accounting tools for VAX. 

Page 31. 


Industry giant faces fight 
from Canadian underdog 


INFORMIX UPDATE: A QUICK REPORT ON DB2. 


Quick. 

What’s the fastest way to write 
a report from a DB2"database? 

Use a fourth generation 
report writer. 

Presenting Report/DB2"ffom 
Informix* 

It’s a fourth-generation report 
writer and a perfect complement to 
QMF™ It lets DB2 users and developers 
use a blend of non-procedural and 
procedural syntax to design and build 
complex reports quickly and easily 

Fbr instance, instead of writing 


dozens of lines of COBOL, you can use 
simple non-procedural statements to 
generate page headings, footings, control 
breaks and the like. 

While precise formatting and 
complex data manipulation is made 
possible by user-specified variables and 
procedural logic statements such as 
IF-THEN-ELSE, DO WHILE, and FOR. 

SQL and MVS, but noTSOi 

Report/DB2 uses exactly the same 
SQL as DB2 to access data. So it!s a breeze 
to learn. It runs as a batch program in 
MVS environment and doesn’t require 


TSO. Whatb more, it's built on an IBM®- 
supplied interface. Which means it’ll 
be compatible with all future releases 
of DB2. 

Write on a PC, 
run on a mainframe. 

Report/DB2 is based on the report 
writer in Informix-SQL, our own best¬ 
selling RDBMS for UNIXT MS"-DOS 
and VMS" So instead of tying up your 
mainframe, you can use Informix-SQL 
and a PC to develop Report/DB2 
reports. And then move them over to 
the mainframe. 


Wait! We’re not finished. 

Report/DB2 is just the first in our 
family of fourth generation application 
development tools and utilities for DB2. 

Fbr details on Report/DB2, call or 
write Informix Software, Inc., 4100 
Bohannon Drive, Menlo Park, CA 94025, 
415/322-4100. And we’ll give you a com¬ 
plete report, quickly 

U INFORMIX 

The RDBMS for people who know better. 


Informix is a registered trademark and Report/DB2 is a trademark of Informix Software, Inc. Other names indicated by ® or TM are trademarks or tradenames of their respective manufacturers 01987, Informix Software, Inc. 


AUGUST 10,1987 


COMPUTERWORLD 


25 
































SOFTWARE & SERVICES 


SSPS ramps up 9370 tools 

Analysis, graphics, tables packages to run under VM/IS 


NEW ORLEANS — At the recent Infor¬ 
mation Center Conference and Exposi¬ 
tion held here, SSPS, Inc., based in Chica¬ 
go, announced that it will make its 
mainframe and minicomputer products 
available on the IBM 9370 Information 
System running VM/IS. 

SPSS-X is a comprehensive data analy¬ 
sis package that is produced by the com¬ 
pany. 

SPSS-X Tables, an option to the SPSS- 
X system, displays analysis results, ac¬ 
cording to the vendor. 

SPSS Graphics can reportedly display 


information in 40 chart types, including 
pie, bar, line and regression charts. 

In addition, the vendor said, SPSS 
Graphics has the ability to display maps 
and text pages as well as multiformat 
combinations. 

SPSS-X Capture, an SPSS-X option, 
reportedly provides a bridge between 
SQL/DS query language and SPSS-X. 

Initial licensing fees on the IBM 9370 
for SSPS-X range from $3,000 to $5,000. 
SSPS-X Tables prices vary from $1,500 
to $2,000. The graphics product costs 
$2,500 to $6,000. 


Pentagon 

CONTINUED FROM PAGE 25 

stages of systems design, under a pro¬ 
gram called Manpower and Personnel In¬ 
tegration, or Manprint. Begun three 
years ago by the U.S. Army, the program 
is beginning to have a definite effect on 
military design practices, according to a 
recent article in the Institute of Electri¬ 
cal and Electronics Engineers’ Spectrum 
magazine. 

No longer flying blind 

For example, the Army is developing the 
cockpit computer for the Light Experi¬ 
mental Helicopter by running simulator 
tests. The simulators show how pilots 


The most up-to-date training in the 
UNIX* System, from the people who 
keep the UNIX System up-to-date. 




What could make 
more sense than UNIX 
System training from the 
people who invented the 
UNIX System—the people 
responsible for all its updates 
and revisions. AT&T 

Created to train AT&T’s own 
professionals, our curriculum is 
the most comprehensive avail¬ 
able-including C language as 
well as the UNIX System. And 
every course is practical and 
job-related. 

Training for everyone 

□ Systems developers 

□ Applications programmers 

□ Technical specialists 

□ System managers and users 
Whatever your specialty, AT&T 
has the right curriculum, from 
basic overviews to programming 
to business applications and data 
communications. And every 
course is kept up-to-the-minute 
with such recent advances as 
System V Release 3.0. 


Individual attention 

Classes are limited in size, so that 
each student can be given individ¬ 
ual instruction and supervision. 

In laboratory classes, each stu¬ 
dent is assigned his own terminal. 
Instruction is by AT&T UNIX System 
veterans and is personal, 


thorough, 
productive. 

Classes 
forming now 

Reserve as 
quickly as possi¬ 
ble for preferred 
dates at our com¬ 
pletely equipped 
training centers in Atlanta, Chi¬ 
cago, Dublin, OH, Los Angeles, 
Princeton, NJ, and Sunnyvale, CA. 
Or we’ll arrange instruction on 
your site at your convenience. But 
don’t wait—call or write now 
for information and seat 
reservations. ©i^-awt 


Free fact-packed training catalog: 

Call 1800 247-1212, ext. 1002, or mail this coupon. 


CW 8/10/870 


Registrar, AT&T Training, 

PO. Box 45038,Jacksonville, FL 32232-997 

Please rush me your course catalog with information on: 

□ UNIX System training □ UNIX System video training 

□ Data communications and networking training 


Name. 

Title- 


Company. 
Address_ 


City_ 

Phone L 


State. 



AT&T 

The right choice. 


handle the work load and tell cockpit de¬ 
signers how to allocate the tasks between 
pilot and computer. According to Spec¬ 
trum, the helicopter is expected to have 
just two or three CRT displays wth sim¬ 
ple menus (instead of row after row of 
gauges and dials), a voice-recognition 
control system and a helmet-mounted dis¬ 
play conveying all the pictorial and digi¬ 
tal information needed to fly it. 

The military’s research into human 
factors has produced some important les¬ 
sons about the design of user interface 
software. The U.S. Air Force Electronic 
Systems Division contracted with hu¬ 
man-factors experts at Mitre Corp. in 
Bedford, Mass., to develop guidelines 
for software design. The resulting prod¬ 
uct should be posted on bulletin boards in 
MIS shops everywhere. 

The recommendations are contained 


A T LONG last, the 
Department of 
Defense is 

considering human factors in 
the early stages of systems 
design. 


in a handbook, Guidelines for Designing 
User Interface Software, by Mitre’s Sid¬ 
ney L. Smith and Jane N. Mosier. Summa¬ 
rized below are six guidelines: 

• Ensure that a user need enter data 
only once and that the computer can ac¬ 
cess the data if needed thereafter for the 
same task or for different tasks. This re¬ 
quires an integrated and flexible soft¬ 
ware design so that different programs 
can access previously entered data. 

• Ensure that whatever data a user 
needs for any transaction will be available 
for a display. For example, header infor¬ 
mation should be retained or generated 
anew when a user is paging or scrolling 
through data tables. 

• Provide flexible sequence control so 
that users can accomplish necessary 
transactions involving data entry, dis¬ 
play and transmission or can obtain guid¬ 
ance in connection with any transaction. 
For example, the user should be able to go 
forward or backward at will when scan¬ 
ning a multipage display. 

• Design standard procedures for ac¬ 
complishing similar, logically related 
transactions. Standard procedures will 
facilitate user learning and efficient sys¬ 
tem operation. 

• Ensure that data transmission func¬ 
tions are integrated with other informa¬ 
tion-handling functions within a system. 

A user should be able to transmit data us¬ 
ing the same computer system and pro¬ 
cedures used for general entry, editing, 
display and other processing of data. 

• Whenever possible, provide automat¬ 
ed measures to protect data security, re¬ 
lying on computer capabilities rather 
than on more fallible human procedures. 
This requires automated security mea¬ 
sures — both to prevent intrusion by un¬ 
authorized users and to minimize data 
loss due to equipment failures and user er¬ 
rors. 

Sure, this all sounds like common 
sense. But how many systems have you 
seen that actually follow all six guide¬ 
lines? 


Betts is Computerivorld’s Washington, D.C., cor¬ 
respondent. 


26 


COMPUTERWORLD 


AUGUST 10,1987 












































SOFTWARE & SERVICES 


Alliant adds Ada 
to FX minisupers 

LITTLETON, Mass. — Alliant Comput¬ 
er Systems Corp. has announced the 
availability of parallel-tasking Ada, the 
FX/Ada Development System, for its FX 
series of minisupercomputer systems. 
FX/Ada, an enhanced version of the Ver- 
dix Ada Development System, combines 
Alliant’s parallel processing architecture 
with the parallel constructs inherent in 
Ada, the company said. 

The FX/Ada language has allowed 
Boeing Co.’s Commercial Airplane Divi¬ 
sion to mix routines of different languages 
in the same program, according to Dilip 
Kumar, manager of the flight systems lab¬ 
oratory that is using the FX/8 minisuper¬ 
computer system to perform real-time 
flight simulation for a new medium-range 
7J7 aircraft. 

Kumar’s staff is developing new code 
in Ada while also using existing Fortran 
and C routines, he added. 

The FX/Ada Development System, in¬ 
cluding the compiler, screen-oriented 
symbolic debugger, library maintenance 
utilities, programming tools and runtime 
system, costs $13,000 for an FX/1 uni¬ 
processor license and $41,000 for the 
FX/8 with one to four computational ele¬ 
ments. 

It costs $55,000 for the FX/8 with five 
to eight computational elements. 


Industry giant 

CONTINUED FROM PAGE 25 

mains to be seen. Cybermation is expand¬ 
ing its six-man direct sales force but faces 
competition from the software industry’s 
heavyweight. Computer Associates’ 
move last June to acquire Uccel will give 
the resulting software company a near 
monopoly in the job scheduling package 
arena. Computer Associates’ CA-Sched- 
uler controls approximately 21% of the 
market, according to Computer Intelli¬ 
gence in La Jolla, Calif. The research firm 
estimated that Uccel’s UCC-7 controls 
69% of the market. Smaller players in the 
market include Southwest Software, VM 
Software, Inc. and Software Concepts, 
Inc., which together constitute an addi¬ 
tional 9% of the market. 

The North Carolina customer is a user 
of both ESP and UCC-7 and said he re¬ 
serves UCC-7 for the large batches of 
production jobs. UCC-7 is more compli¬ 
cated to install and use, leaving many 
smaller jobs to be handled by the Cyber¬ 
mation product, he said. 

In addition, the Cybermation job 
scheduler allows a user to test the defini¬ 
tions he used to determine when his job 
will run. With the command Next 10, he 
can get a display of the next 10 times his 
job will run. 

The Dependent Job Control compo¬ 
nent manages the order in which jobs run 
so that a job that depends on the results of 
another does not run until those results 
are available. In addition, jobs may be sub¬ 
mitted by remote centers, said Tina Rog¬ 
ers, Cybermation marketing manager. 

“It’s designed for users who don’t 
know that much about data processing’’ 
and allows system operators to make 
modifications to existing schedules dy¬ 
namically, she said. 


Morino buys into BST, will link product lines 


BY ROSEMARY HAMILTON 

CW STAFF 


VIENNA, Va. — Morino Associates, Inc. 
recently paid $1.5 million for a minority 
interest in Business Software Technol¬ 
ogy, Inc. (BST), a Westboro, Mass.-based 
maker of change control software, offi¬ 
cials from both companies have an¬ 
nounced. 

Under terms of the agreement, both 
vendors will develop a product that links 
the BST product, Endevor, with Morino 
Associates’ Information Systems product 
line, which includes 14 utilities to man¬ 
age, monitor and analyze the IBM MVS 


and MVS/XA environments. 

Endevor allows users to keep track of 
changes made in applications software. 
Endevor-DB, for instance, provides man¬ 
agement tools to control development of 
applications used with Cullinet Software, 
Inc.’s IDMS/R data base management 
system. 

Snares marketing rights 

The alliance will also give Morino Asso¬ 
ciates the right to market BST products. 
Mario Marino, president and chief execu¬ 
tive officer of Marino Associates, will join 
BST’s board of directors. 

The interface product does not have an 


availability date. “We’ve been strong in 
data centers, just made our entry into 
networking, and we’ve been working on 
ways to get into applications,” Marino 
said. 

Marino added that the alliance with 
BST is a “real good first move” in the 
firm’s plans to grow as a systems software 
vendor. 

The two vendors have done business 
together before. The Marino Associates 
performance monitor for IDMS/R was de¬ 
veloped by BST. 

Asked why Marino Associates did not 
acquire BST, Marino said, “They didn’t 
have to sell.” 



Do you turn a deaf ear when C.I.C.S. speaks? the LISTENER won’t! 

When C.I.C.S. informs you about those “little” items that happen, such as transaction 
abends, terminal status, file recovery, signon information and more, do you know about it as it 
occurs? Can you find out what has happened previously without waiting for C.I.C.S. to shut 
down? the LISTENER can! 

It timestamps this data to a file browsable online with its menu screens and tailorable PF 
keys. It can browse any VS AM cluster. It can search or exclude groups of data at your 
command. It can monitor your system at intervals. It can provide hard-copy and backup. Its 
“suspend” facility allows other transactions to execute, yet can return you to where you left. 

Completely operating-system independent, its price is only $4,690, and is backed with 
C.I.C.S. experience since 1.1.1. 

T TA/TTT'DTA friTTl/TU 1 AT?T7I?D f Perpetual license & maintenance 

I A I IVl I i nl J JLlVlXL Ur I ill xv; to the first 250 customers. 


Independent Research, Inc. 

100 Arthur 

South Elgin, Illinois 60177 
(312) 830-1717 

c 1986 by Independent Research Inc. All rights reserved. Printed in the U.S.A. 

C.I.C.S. is a proprietary software product of International Business Machines Corp. 

Our sister galaxy, Andromeda, is shown by a Lick Observatory Photograph. 


For additional information, please send this coupon! 

To _ 

Company: _ 

Address: _ 

City, State, Zip _ 

Telephone _ 

□ Please send information for 30-day FREE trial copy 


AUGUST 10,1987 


COMPUTERWORLD 


27 




























VN e ' 






. - q° o ^S o<v ' 

. - <ss££ ell 


V 60 . 

<$&! 

;\^ e . S S\ 

,^;jro 

w®- 


*VO0 


jVLvoQ, 


O- 



^rw> 


JkTut 


W1 



-#> 


s© 


s e© sxNN - 
¥ 
ves- 


$ 


s 

•y\t© eS ' 

7«(\©W 

f# e ; \ e©\°l 


*o\© 


Vrfgisk' 

6 * 

;io"* \S»''^”'" 

■ls^'- ' '■* 


lie 


\S 


Meet the perfect 
software companion 
for your PC. 


se® 


jM. 


\\\e 

eO®® 




It’s your first look at a true PC/4GL. You see com¬ 
prehensive menus and windows, powerful relational 
data base management, efficient 4GL reporting, and 
cooperative micro/mainframe information 
management. 

You and RAMIS‘/PC Workstation, 

A Perfect Combination. 

RAMIS/PC Workstation brings both novice and 
expert users all available options through helpful pop¬ 
up windows or through expert paths. So users are never 
frustrated with syntax, and are productive immediately, 
no matter what their experience. 

An advanced relational data base management 
system combines with a 4GL report generator to create 
high performance, stand-alone PC applications. And, 
the applications you develop can be used at your PC or 
on the mainframe. 

You can automatically convert PC applications to 
run with mainframe RAMIS Information System. You 
decide which processing environment is best at any 
stage of an application’s life cycle—PC, mainframe, or 
a combination of the two. 

It’s the only true PC/4GL. 

You can’t find a more compatible 4GL, and a better 
match for your PC software. 


Through its menu selections, RAMIS/PC Workstation 
allows you to automatically convert uploaded/down¬ 
loaded data, or import/export data from PC spread¬ 
sheets, graphics, and word processing programs for 
immediate use. 

Data from your favorite PC software like Lotus 
1-2-3,® dBASE III* MultiMate,® Chart-Master," and many 
others can be used without intermediate conversions or 
incompatibility. And, you can exchange data between 
the PC and the mainframe, too. You simply choose 
options from menus and windows. The tasks of 
conversion and file creation are done automatically! 

This is your chance! 

Now is your opportunity to meet the perfect PC/4GL, 
simply by letting us know what you consider the perfect 
PC/4GL is. And, when you do, you could win a free 
RAMIS/PC Workstation! 

All you have to do is write a personal ad describing 
what you need from the perfect PC/4GL to do your job 
better, and send it to the address below. Contest entries 
will be judged on how creatively you define your 
specific needs. Don’t forget to include your name, title, 
company, address, and phone number, so we can let 
you know if you’ve won. 


Send your personal ad to: RAMIS/PC Workstation 
PC/4GL Contest, On-Line Software International, Inc., 
Box 2392, Princeton, NJ 08540, Attn: Marketing 
Communications. All personal ads should be post¬ 
marked no later than September 15. Winner will be 
notified in writing. 

Find out more about RAMIS/PC Workstation or any 
of our other products at a free seminar offered in your 
area. Call or write On-Line Software International, 
Inc., Two Executive Drive, Fort Lee, NJ 07024. Service 
Bureau, VAR and OEM programs are available. 

800 - 642-0177 

In Canada: 4l6-671-2272/In Europe: 44-1-63L3696 



On-Line 

Software 

International 

Authorities 
in IBM* 
Software 


RAMIS/PC Workstation. The PC/4GL Information Management System for All Users. 


Lotus 1 -2-3 is a registered trademark of l-otus Development Corporation, dBASE III, MultiMate and Chart-Master are registered trademarks of Asluon-Tate; IBM is a registered trademark of International Business Machines. 




- “ ' 


SOFTWARE & SERVICES 


Index Technology ties in to Pansophic’s Telon 


Info centers 

CONTINUED FROM PAGE 25 

solutions requires far more technical ex¬ 
pertise than the information center’s past 
responsibility of bringing employees up to 
speed on personal computers. Yet, de¬ 
partmental support also requires heavy 
involvement with these users, which is of¬ 
ten unfamiliar territory for the traditional 
data processing team. 

What Jacobson says he sees evolving is 
a blurred distinction between the tradi¬ 
tional DP department and the information 
center. As user issues become increasing¬ 
ly complex, the expertise of both groups 
will be needed. 

Jacobson’s theory is backed up by Chil¬ 
dren’s Hospital’s assistant vice-president 
of information systems, J. Malcolm Mur¬ 
ray, who oversees both departments. 
“We try to have different types of people 
under one management group,” he says. 
“Keeping the information center sepa¬ 
rate from DP has been a major concern. 
DP is very much involved in the process of 
systems requirements and definitions. 
The information center is much more in¬ 
teractive. We’ll always have a need for 
‘people persons,’ as opposed to technical 
specialists.” 

Partnership 

Jacobson says he expects to work more 
closely in the future with the DP manager 
to address departmental needs. Eventual¬ 
ly, he adds, end-user computing needs will 
no longer be considered the isolated prob¬ 
lem of the information center. “The di¬ 
rector of DP and I now see ourselves as 
partners,” Jacobson says. “By all of us re¬ 
porting to Malcolm, we can bring a wide 
suite of disciplines to bear on information 
problems.” 

Just how all this will fall into place re¬ 
mains to be seen. Because it is an evolving 
process, the role that each segment of the 
information systems department plays is 
now being decided on a case-by-case ba¬ 
sis. 

The information center, for instance, 
took charge in the recent case of an end 
user — an office manager from the hospi¬ 
tal’s gastroenterology department — 
who developed her own application. The 
information center staff and the end user 
together developed a four-page work plan 
“that will take her to full implementa¬ 
tion,” Jacobson says. The plan took seven 
hours to develop and will help this user re¬ 
write the program for a multiuser envi¬ 
ronment. 


Manager 

CONTINUED FROM PAGE 25 

allows users to transfer a screen of data 
from one application to another, a spokes¬ 
man said. 

Net-Pass, a menu-driven system, in¬ 
cludes a response-time monitor that re¬ 
cords data on the transactions of active 
applications, including the number of 
transactions, the average time of each 
transaction and the maximum time of all 
transactions. 

The session manager offers a broad¬ 
cast facility that is said to allow users to 
send messages to other users, who can re¬ 
ceive them regardless of the application 
they are currently running. Software AG 
said the product supports commonly used 
security software products. 

AUGUST 10,1987 


CAMBRIDGE, Mass. — Index Technol¬ 
ogy Corp., a maker of computer-aided 
software engineering tools, recently said 
it will offer an interface product to the 
Pansophic Systems, Inc. code generator, 
Telon, later this quarter. 

The $9,000 link, XL/Interface Telon, 
will allow screens and report designs from 
Index’s Excelerator product to be trans¬ 
ferred directly to the Telon environment, 
the company said. 

Telon, which generates either Cobol 
or PL/I code, is often used in developing 
on-line information systems that require 
multiple screens and reports. Pansophic 
specified a transfer format to which Index 


designed the interface product. 

According to Richard Carpenter, pres¬ 
ident of Index, XL/Interface Telon is the 
“first in a series of interfaces to applica¬ 
tions generators. 

“We picked Telon first because, over¬ 
all, it was the most requested by our cus¬ 
tomers,” Carpenter added. 

He said that many of the company’s us¬ 
ers currently use their own bridges to link 
the Excelerator design software to the 
Telon environment. But the majority of 
users will “pass on the specifications to 
the Telon programmer who re-enters it. 
Clearly, there’s little value added here,” 
he said. 


“The objective here is to automate 
more of the software development life cy¬ 
cle,” said Sue O’Brien, Pansophic’s prod¬ 
uct manager for Telon. O’Brien said the 
Pansophic-designed transport facility, 
which specifies the format for data to be 
used in the Telon environment, will be 
part of the Index offering. However, it will 
be wrapped into the next major release of 
Telon, scheduled for mid-1988. 

According to O’Brien, XL/Interface 
Telon will allow users to pass on the early 
design work to Telon, enabling them to 
“pick up work in Telon at a later step [in 
the design cycle] and eliminate duplica¬ 
tion.” 


ISN’T IT TIME THAT YOU 
REQUIRED MORE THAN A LOW 
RATE FROM YOUR LEASING 

COMPANY? 


ECONOCOM 

PROVIDES: 


9370 

SPECIAL LEASE PROGRAM 
FOR ADDITIONAL 
INFORMATION CALL 

l-800-IBM®-9370 


GUARANTEED UPGRADES 

ITS NOT THE START — ITS THE SERVICE 
OVER THE LIFE OF THE LEASE — THAT COUNTS 

COMPLETE IBM®PRODUCT SUPPORT 

FROM S/36 TO 3090, AND S/38.9370 AND 4381’S 
IN BETWEEN — WE SUPPORT ALL YOUR EQUIPMENT NEEDS 

USED EQUIPMENT 

USED EQUIPMENT CAN SAVE YOU MONEY. WE WONT 
HESITATE TO RECOMMEND WHAT IS BEST FOR YOU 

ALTERNATIVE PRODUCTS 

EMC2 MEMORY, PRTNTRONIX PRINTERS — WE DISTRIBUTE 
48 "ALTERNATIVE PRODUCTS" THAT WILL SAVE YOU MONEY 

PRODUCT MANAGERS/BRIEFINGS 

OUR PRODUCT MANAGERS CAN DISCUSS SUMMIT. 
SILVERLAKE OR OTHER PROJECTED MARKET DEVELOPMENT 

CONSULTING SERVICES 

WE PROVIDE CONTRACT TECHNICAL PERSONNEL TO 
HELP YOU MEET YOUR PROJECT DEADLINES 

TELEPHONE SYSTEMS 

AT&T. ROLM AND MITEL — WE PROVIDE COMPLETE 
LEASING AND UPGRADE SERVICES 

MAINTENANCE 

NOW IN 18 CITIES — WE PROVIDE THE TYPE OF SER¬ 
VICE YOU EXPERIENCED IN "THE GOOD OLD DAYS" 


AND 


LOW RATES 


WE UNDERSTAND THE IMPORTANCE OF COMPETITIVE 
RATES AND WE DELIVER THEM AT ECONOCOM 


O' 

ECONOCOM 

Making the system work. >m 

Corporate Headquarters • 845 Crossover Lane • Memphis, Tennessee • 38117 • (901) 762-9200 

Offices in Atlanta, Baltimore, Bangor, Birmingham, Boston, Boulder, Charlotte, Charleston, Cincinnati, 

Columbus, Concord, Dallas, Denver, Detroit, Grand Rapids, Houston, Jonesboro, Knoxville, Little Rock, 

Los Angeles/Orange County, Louisville, Memphis, Miami, Nashville, New Orleans, New York, Norfolk/Richmond, 
Oklahoma City, Orlando, Philadelphia, Phoenix, Seattle, St. Louis, Tampa, Tulsa, Tucson, Washington, D.C. 


IBM is a registered trademark of International Business Machines sUk\ i 


= »ifMOOS4%soo»'>0*. 


.MJAiL.sassooatiO*. 
o» eou'Ovfs’, tsso«s 


as dcJQ 


OKJITAL 

DEALERS 

ASSOCIATION 


COMPUTERWORLD 


29 





















NOW 

TOUCAN HAVE 
THE MODEM YOU’VE 
ALWAYS WANTED 

AT A PRICE 

YOU NEVER DREAMED 

YOU COULD GET 


At Hayes we just found a way to make the best-selling PC modems in 
the world even better. We lowered their price. From now on our 
Smartmodem 2400,''’ Smartmodem 2400B, n ' Smartmodem 1200," 
Smartmodem 1200B," Smartmodem 1200C" and our new 
Smartmodem 1200A' will cost considerably less. Up to one-third less* 

So if you’ve always wanted a Hayes modem, external or internal, for an 
IBM" PC or compatible, IBM PC Convertible, 

Apple" Macintosh?*Apple II, or almost 
any other PC, now you don’t have to setde 




.1X1, LALLUlOl \^1 111LV.111CL1, 1U1 ail 

Hawes 


*V'' 


mm 


< 1987 Hayes Microcomputer Products, Inc. PO. Box 105203. Atlanta. GA 30348. 404-441-1617 

*Based on estimated retail prices Requires external modem 

fBaBMBkfflw&SSt 



SMARTMODEM 2400 






HS 


AA 


CD 


OH 


RD 


SD 


TR 


MR 






SOFTWARE & SERVICES 


NEW PRODUCTS 


Systems software 

Template Graphics Soft¬ 
ware has ported its implemen¬ 
tation of the Programmer’s Hi¬ 
erarchical Interactive Graphics 
Standard to Apollo Computer, 
Inc., Masscomp, Silicon Graph¬ 
ics, Inc., Sun Microsystems, Inc. 
and Digital Equipment Corp. 
GPX workstations. 

The software, Figaro, is a 
device- and computer-indepen¬ 
dent graphics standard designed 
for two- and three-dimensional 
graphics applications requiring 
hierarchical data structures, 
geometric modeling, rapid dis¬ 
play modification and interactive 
input. 

License fees for Figaro soft¬ 
ware on the Apollo, DEC, Mass¬ 
comp, Silicon Graphics and Sun 
workstations start at $3,000. 

Template Graphics Software, 
9685 Scranton Road, San Diego, 
Calif. 92121. 


Applications 

packages 

Libra Programming, Inc. has 

released a line of construction 
accounting software for the Digi¬ 
tal Equipment Corp. family of 
VAX computers. 

The Libra Construction 
Package includes integrated 
software modules for accounts 
payable, accounts receivable, 
billing, general ledger, inven¬ 
tory, job costing, order entry, 
payroll and property manage¬ 
ment. 

Prices range from $1,950 to 
$4,890. 

Libra Programming, 1954 E. 
7000 South, Salt Lake City, 
Utah 84121. 


Languages 

Whitesmiths, Ltd. has an¬ 
nounced its Version 3.2 C 
Compiler for Digital Equip¬ 
ment Corp. VAXs running VMS. 

Features include C source- 
level interactive debugging with 
breakpointing and variable dis¬ 
play and improved code genera¬ 
tion. The compiler also produces 
compiler and assembler source 
listings, including the ability to 
display high-level source code on 
one listing. 

Standard C features include 
structure assignment, struc- 
ture-as-function arguments and 
functions-returning structures. 

The Version 3.2 C Compiler 
is priced from $1,500. 

Whitesmiths, 59 Power 
Road, Westford, Mass. 01886. 


Utilities 

Version 2 of DBaid, a menu- 
driven productivity tool for use 
with the IBM IMS Data Base Re¬ 
covery Control (DBRC) feature, 
has been announced by Finan¬ 
cial Technologies Interna¬ 


tional, Inc. 

DBaid for DBRC operates un¬ 
der IBM’s ISPF and generates 
DBRC cards and executes DBRC 
in foreground or background 
mode. 

The permanent license fee for 
DBaid is $15,000. 

Financial Technologies Inter¬ 


national, 46th Floor, One World 
Trade Center, New York, N.Y. 
10048. 


Development tools 

An automated extension of the 
Pride Information Systems En¬ 
gineering Methodology, which is 
said to provide automated assis¬ 
tance during the design or modi¬ 
fication of an information sys¬ 


tem, has been announced by M. 
Bryce & Associates, Inc. 

Automated Systems Engi¬ 
neering for system design is 
used as a computer-aided design 
tool. It interprets specifications 
developed from the Pride chro¬ 
nological decomposition tech¬ 
nique and then generates a de¬ 
sign, including the application’s 
logical data base design. It can 
design interactive, batch, office 


automation or computer-assist¬ 
ed systems. Supporting docu¬ 
mentation can be generated. 

The Pride products are avail¬ 
able on such mainframes as 
IBM’s MVS and MVS/XA and 
Digital Equipment Corp.’s 
VAX/VMS. Prices start at 
$ 110 , 000 . 

M. Bryce & Associates, 777 
Alderman Road, Palm Harbor, 
Fla. 34683. 


CA-Opera. 

The Unattended Data Center. 
A Decade-Long Dream. 
CA Has It Now. 


A unique, unequalled 
knowledge-based software system. 

After thousands of hours of on-the-job and 
on-site development. Computer Associates 
has now achieved something no one has 
even attempted before. Now the skill, 
knowledge and experience of hundreds of 
senior operators and systems analysts is 
harnessed in the incredible CA-OPERA'” 
software. And now, lights-out processing 
finally becomes possible. 

Efficiency and productivity 
like never before. 

CA-OPERA the most advanced interactive 
message processor ever created for MVS 
greatly increases the productivity of operators 
and of their hardware, too. All messages 
are processed instantaneously, accurately 
and with far greater reliability. 

Message madness 
and console clutter gone forever. 

Only the most critical WTOs and WTORs reach 
the screen with about 80% of all messages 
being handled without operator involvement. 
For messages requiring a response, no one 
needs take the time to seek the answer 
elsewhere. CA-OPERA supplies the correct 
response automatically. 

Now, with ca-opera. Computer Associates can meet 
guide's definition of unattended operations: 

GUIDE'S Definition _ CA’s Solution 

Automated Production Control: CA-SCHEDULER* (MVS) 

Restart Management: CA-SCHEDULER* (MVS) 

DASD Management System: CA-DYNAMVDASD 

Report Distribution: CA-DISPATCH’" 

Online Monitoring: CA-JARS"7CICS 

Operator Command Assistance: CA-OPERA'" 







mm# 


For more information, write today or call 
Dana Williams: 1-800-645-3003. 
Computer Associates 

711 Stewart Avenue, Garden City, N.Y 11530-4787 

'&■ 1987 Computer Associates international, Inc. 


Photo: Baxter Travenol Laboratories, Inc. Data Center, a ca-opera user. 


(ZOMPUTER 

Associates 

Software superior by design. 
Resource & Operations Management 


• World's leading independent software company. 

• Broad range of integrated business and data processing 
software for mainframes, minis and micros. 

• Worldwide service and support network of more than 70 offices. 
DBMS • Financial • Graphics • Spreadsheets • Project Management 


AUGUST 10,1987 


COMPUTERWORLD 


31 




















NO MATTER WHAT LANGUAGE OR DATA 
BASE PRODUCT YOU ARE USING — 

IF IT ISN’T CLARION, YOUR APPLICATIONS 
ARE TAKING TOO tfUCH TIME TO WRITE. 


CLARION: 

• saves development time 

• increases programmer productivity 

• lowers development costs 

• yields better, richer 
applications 
for single users or 
a network of users 



TRADITIONAL APPLICATION DEVELOPMENT TIME 


CLARION TIME 


THE CLARION ADVANTAGE 

POWERFUL MODERN LANGUAGE. 
ADVANCED DATA BASE MANAGEMENT 
SCREEN and REPORT GENERATORS 
FAST COMPILE and TEST 
INTEGRATED FAMILY of UTILITIES 


II... your commercial microcomputer applications are 
written in Assembler, BASIC, C, COBOL, Pascal or 
any of the data base languages... 

AND... you have simply run out of time... 
or programmers... or money... 

THEN • •• you owe it to yourself and to those who depend on your 
professional skills — to make the easy move to CLARION... 

ELSE • •• you'll miss out on the CLARION advantage. 


$ Ll ARION~ 


'O'* 

I 






CLARION is priced at $395 plus shipping. It runs on 
any IBM PC, XT, AT or true compatible with 320KB of 
memory and a hard disk drive. 


CLARION’ 

'from BARRINGTON SYSTEMS, INC. 



To order CLARION or to get our 
free 16-page brochure and the 
■ Sample Program diskette, simply ■ 
call TOLL FREE... 


I 


l 


L 1-800/354-5444 


150 EAST SAMPLE ROAD 

mmmsmmmmmmsmmm 


POMPANO BEACH, FLORIDA 33064-3597 


305/785-4555 


CLARION is a registered trademark of Barrington Systems, Inc. 


Copyright 1986 Barrington Systems 




































YES! Please enter my own subscription to COMPUTERWORLD at the Special Introductory 
Rate of just $38.95’for 51 issues — a savings of over $5.00 off the basic rate. Plus, I’ll also 
receive all 12 COMPUTERWORLD FOCUS issues FREE with my subscription 

□ Bill me. □ Payment enclosed. Address shown: □ Home 

FIRST NAME M.I. LAST NAME 


□ Office 


2. TITLE/FUNCTION (Odeone) 

IS MIS DP MANAGEMENT 

19 Vice President, Asst VP 

21 Dir Mgr. Suprv , IS/MIS/DP Services 

22 Dir , Mgr, Suprv . ol Operations, Planning, Adm Services 

23 Dir , Mgr, Suprv , Analyst, of Systems 

31 Dir, Mgr, Suprv , of Programming 

32 Programmer, Methods Analyst 
35 Dir . Mgr. Suprv . OA/WP 

38 Data Comm Network/Systems Mgt 
OTHER COMPANY MANAGEMENT 

11 President , Owner/Partner , General Mgr 

12 Vice President/Asst VP 

13 Treasurer Controller. Financial Officer 
ENGINEERING 

41 Engmeenng, Scientific, R 4 D. Tech Mgt 


1 BUSINESS/INDUSTRY (Circle one) 

10 Manufacturer (other than computer) 

20 Finance/Insurance/Real Estate 
30 Mediane'Law/Education 
40 Whoiesaie/Retail/Trade 
50 Business Service (except DP) 

60 Government — State/Federal/Local 
65 Communications Systems/Public Utilities/Transportation 
70 Petro Chem. Mining, Construction, Agriculture 
80 Manufacturer of Computers. Computer-Related Systems 
or Renpherais 

85 DP Service Bureau/Software/Planning/Consulting 
90 Computer/Penpheral Dealer/Distntxitor/Retailef 
75 User Other- 


SALES 

51 Manufactunng Sales Reps . Sales/Mktg Mgt 

OTHER PROFESSIONALS 

60 Consulting Mgt 

70 Medical Legal, Accounting Mgt 

80 Educators, Journalist, Ubranans, Students 

90 Others- 

(Please specify) 

1 COMPUTER INVOLVEMENT (Circle all that apply) 
Types of equipment with which you are personally 
involved either as a user, vendor, or consultant 
A Mainframes/Superminis 
B Mimcomputers/Small Business Computers 
C Microcomputers/Desktops 
D Communications Svstems 
E Office Automation Systems 
F No Computer Involvement 


(Please speedy) 


328732-3 


ORDER YOUR EXECUTIVE PERK TODAY! 


1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 


1 1 1 

1 1 1 

I 

1 

1 1 

1 



• U S. only 

T1TLE 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 

| 

till 








COMPANY | | | | | | | | 

1 

Mil 

1 1 

1 

L l 

1 

1 

1 

1 

1 1 

AOOREM | | | | | | | | 

1 

1 1 1 

1 1 

1 

I 

I 

L L 

J 



C1TY 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 


Mill 

LL.J 

STATE 

L 

ZIP 

L 

J J 

L L 


































NO POSTAGE 
NECESSARY 

IF MAILED 

IN THE 

UNITED STATES 


BUSINESS REPLY MAIL 

FIRST CUSS PERMIT NO. 55 NEPTUNE, NJ 07754 



POSTAGE WILL BE PAID BY ADDRESSEE 



1 

COMPUTERWORLD 

CIRCULATION DEPARTMENT 

P.O. Box 1565 

Neptune, NJ 07754-9916 



III..,1.II...1.1.1..Ml.LI. 

1.II.II....I.II 






























MICROCOMPUTING 


SMALL 

TALK 



William Zachmann 

Prime rates 
a thumbs-up 

It isn’t very often that I get tru¬ 
ly excited about a new product, 
particularly one from a mini¬ 
computer vendor. But then, it 
isn’t often that a product from a 
mini vendor is based on a stan¬ 
dard microprocessor and has 
lots of highly innovative fea¬ 
tures. 

Prime Computer, Inc.’s 
EXL 316 is just such a product. 
It’s based on a standard 16- 
MHz Intel Corp. 80386 micro¬ 
processor. Running Prime’s 
System V Interface Definition, 
compatible with AT&T’s Unix 
System V, Release 3, the EXL 
316 notches benchmarks of 3.2 
million instructions per second, 
according to Prime. 

The EXL 316 would be an 
interesting product even if it 
were simply a 386-based multi¬ 
user system running AT&T's 
Unix System V, Release 3. It’s 
an important development that a 
traditional minicomputer ven¬ 
dor should introduce a powerful 
product based on a standard mi¬ 
croprocessor. 

What makes the EXL 316 an 
exciting product, however, is 

Continued on page 34 


Chip set pits AT against PS/2 

Chips and Technologies claims revamped 20-MHz CPU a match for 386 


Old pro 8088 
soldiers on 


BY ED SCANNELL 

CW STAFF 


MILPITAS, Calif. — Chips and 
Technologies, Inc. last week un¬ 
veiled a 16-MHz IBM Personal 
Computer AT-compatible chip 
set it said will make the AT and 
compatibles effective price/per¬ 
formance competitors against 
IBM’s Personal System/2 during 
at least the next two years. 

Chips and Technologies also 
introduced an IBM Video Graph¬ 


ics Array (VGA) chip set that, at 
$40.50 in quantities of 1,000, is 
priced the same as its IBM En¬ 
hanced Graphics Adapter 
(EGA). The company said its 
EGA users can upgrade immedi¬ 
ately and are eligible for volume 
discounts. 

The CS8221 New Enhanced 
AT chip set, or Neat, is centered 
around Advanced Micro De¬ 
vices, Inc.’s (AMD) 16-MHz 
CPU, which is based on Intel 
Corp.’s 80286-16. It can be up¬ 


graded to 20 MHz and offers a 
70% improvement in through¬ 
put over 10-MHz 80286-based 
systems with one wait state and 
is “nearly equivalent” in perfor¬ 
mance to current 80386-based 
systems, according to Ed Huber, 
AMD’s director of marketing. 

Besides the CPU, Neat con¬ 
sists of a bus/clock controller, an 
interleaved page-mode control¬ 
ler, a peripheral controller and 
an address data buffer. The chip 
Continued on page 34 


Motorola chips away at 386’s edge 



Marketing managers Jeff Nutt and Jack W. Browne Jr. 


With so much attention focused 
on Intel Corp.’s 80386 micro¬ 
processor during the past year, 
many corporate users are per¬ 
haps unaware of competing 32- 
bit chips, including Motorola, 
Inc.’s 68020. 

While Intel’s family of chips 
generally drive Microsoft Corp. 
MS-DOS-compatible personal 
computers, Motorola’s 68000 
family has thus far been the chip 
of choice for multiuser Unix sys¬ 
tems and technical workstations. 
With a faster 68030 on the way 
and MS-DOS software emula¬ 
tors already on the market, Mo¬ 
torola officials say their chips’ 
dominance can extend to PCs as 
well. 

Jack W. Browne Jr., Motoro¬ 
la’s manager of 68000 market¬ 
ing, and Jeff Nutt, 68000 techni¬ 
cal marketing manager, recently 
discussed the 32-bit systems 
market with Computerworld se¬ 
nior writer David Bright. 


The 68000 family’s main 
competition is obviously 
the 80386. How does the 
68020 stack up perfor- 
mancewise against the 
386? 

Browne: The 68020 at the same 
clock speed as the 386 is about 
20% faster. The 386, as I under¬ 
stand it, is in the marketplace at 
16 and 20 MHz. So we have 12, 


16, 20 and 25 MHz. Our 12- 
MHz part is roughly the same 
performance as Intel’s 16-MHz 
part. So that gives us a broader 
range. With the 68030, the first 
products that go into manufac¬ 
turing will be 16 and 20 MHz. 

Nutt: One of the things that 
Intel does is they make a lot of 
benchmark claims of their own. 

Continued on page 36 


Price, reliability fuel 
aging CPU's success 


BY JULIE PITTA 

CW STAFF 


Despite the razzle-dazzle intro¬ 
ductions of systems based on In¬ 
tel Corp.’s powerful 80286 and 
80386 microprocessors this 
year, manufacturers of Intel 
8088-based personal computers 
continue to report brisk sales. 

While the home and the class¬ 
room are natural environments 
for these older PCs, some corpo¬ 
rate users are still looking at 
8088-based systems as low-cost 
solutions for less demanding ap¬ 
plications. 

Last year, 3.9 million 8088- 
based PCs were shipped domes¬ 
tically, compared with 1.3 mil¬ 
lion 80286-based systems, 
according to Dataquest, Inc., a 
San Jose, Calif., market research 
firm. 

While the momentum will 
shift from 8088- to 80286-based 
systems this year, 8088-based 
machines are nonetheless ex¬ 
pected to outsell their 286-based 
Continued on page35 

Inside 

• Recap of Siggraph roll¬ 
outs. Pfcge 37. 

• CSS Laboratories an¬ 
nounces 16- to 20-MHz PC 
compatibles. Page 37. 

• Microplot graphics termi¬ 
nal emulation software sup¬ 
ports PS/2 VGA processor, 
controller. Page 37. 


VS COBOL Workbench with CICS Option is the 
Optimum Environment for Creating CICS Applications 


With the CICS option, VS 
COBOL Workbench gives 
the programmer a dedi¬ 
cated development and 
testing environment on a 
PC for the creation of 
CICS applications. Slow 
response times and con¬ 
flicts with the mainframe 
are removed. 

The CICS option includes 
a screen painter that gen¬ 
erates BMS and complete 
CICS Command Level test 
and run facilities. New 
features added to our 
latest release include BLL 
Cell processing, pointer 
variable support, GET- 
MAIN and FREEMAIN 
including the SET Option 
and 32 bit addressing. 


Users report dramatic 
productivity improvements 
and more. Combined with 
the superb features of VS 
COBOL Workbench, the 
CICS option makes devel¬ 
opment of CICS applica¬ 
tions a joy. 

Other outstanding features 

EBCDIC Option 

To ease the migration of 
testing files, leave them in 
EBCDIC format when moving 
to the PC. 

The World’s Most 
Complete Language 

The most complete syntax 
support of IBM OS/VS 
COBOL, IBM VS COBOL II, 
ANSI’74, ANSI’85 and others. 


Compile and Run Huge 
Programs 

If your programs are large, 
you can handle them with 
VS COBOL Workbench’s 
unique 32 bit architecture 
and the new XM memory 
extender. Programs with 
Data and Procedure 
Divisions of up to 16 MB 
may be handled on an AT. 

XM Memory Extender 
Combined with our 32 bit 
architecture, XM allows you 
to break the 640K barrier 
imposed by DOS. Run your 
VS COBOL Workbench 
programs in protected mode 
and switch to real mode for 
DOS services. 


Unique Testing Tools 
In one product: ANIMATOR 
for source code debugging, 
STRUCTURE ANIMATOR 
for displaying the structure 
of your programs and 
debugging at the structure 
level, ANALYZER for path 
and performance analysis, 
SESSION RECORDER for 
regression testing. All these 
and more to improve 
productivity and produce 
quality applications. 


For the most efficient 
development of either 
your PC or mainframe 
programs, call us now. 

1-800-VS-COBOL 

U.S.: 2465 E. Bayshore Road 
Palo Alto, CA 94303 
(415)856-4161 

U.K.: 26 West Street 
Newbury, Berkshire RG13 1JT 
(0635)32646 


MICRO FOCUS 

A Better Way of Programming 1 " 

Micro Focus, A Better Way of Programming, XM, ANIMATOR, STRUCTURE ANIMATOR, 
ANALYZER and SESSION RECORDER are trademarks of Micro Focus Limited. VS COBOL 
Workbench is a registered trademark of Micro Focus Limited. 


AUGUST 10,1987 


COMPUTERWORLD 


33 































MICROCOMPUTING 


E 

Info 

bee 

rmix 

seminar: 

As you may know, the Informix® 
line of SQL-based RDBMS products 
gives you full portability across VMS^ 
UNUCMSTOS and networked 
systems. 

But for the full story come to 
our free half-day Informix product 
seminar in any one of the cities 
listed below. 

Tb RSVP—and to find out details— 
please call (415) 322-4100. 

Cities Dates 

Atlanta 

10/14 

Baltimore 

10/14 

Boston 

8/3,9/14,10/28,11/18 

Chicago 

8/12,9/15,10/14, 

Dallas 

11/9,12/8 

10/20 

Denver 

10/16 

Detroit 

9/16,10/15, 

Hartford,CT 

11/10,12/9 

10/6 

Houston 

11/6 

Indianapolis 

11/5 

Los Angeles 

8/3,9/14,10/28, 

Menlo Park,CA 

11/18,12/8 

11/5 

Memphis 

10/22 

Minneapolis/ 

St. Paul 

10/29 

New Orleans 

10/14 

New York City 

8/5,9/16, 

North Jersey 
(Woodbridge) 

10/14,11/18 

8/19,11/5,12/2 

Philadelphia 

10/6 

Phoenix 

11/4 

Pittsburgh 

10/8 

Portland 

10/6 

Raleigh, NC 

10/27 

Salt Lake City 

10/15 

San Francisco 

8/5,9/16, 

Seattle 

10/14,11/18 

8/7,9/9,10/7, 

St. Louis 

11/5,12/2 

10/20 

Tfirnpa 

10/7 

Washington, D.C. 8/7,9/9,10/7, 

Canada 

Montreal 

11/5,12/2 

10/19 

Ottawa 

10/20 

Toronto 

8/19,11/5,12/2 

Vancouver 

10/8 

International 

Bonn 

10/16 

FYankfurt 

10/15 

London 

10/13,11/13,12/3 

Munich 

10/6,11/9,12/1 

Paris 

10/8,11/11,12/2 

U INFORMIX 

The RDBMS for people who 

know better. 

Informix is a registered trademark of Informix Software, Inc. 

Other names indicated by TM are trademarks of their respective 

manufacturers. © 1987, Informix Software, Inc. 


34 


Prime 

FROM PAGE 33 

Prime’s bold and forward-look¬ 
ing move in incorporating Locus 
Computing Corp.’s Merge/386 
and PC-Interface software as 
part of the product offering. As 
far as I know, the EXL 386 is the 
first commercially available 
system on which Merge/386 and 
PC-Interface are available. 

Wears many hats 

The EXL 316 is more than just 
a Unix system; it’s a Unix system 
on which one or more users 
have the option of running Mi¬ 
crosoft Corp.’s MS-DOS from 
their terminals in addition to, or 
instead of, Unix System V, Re¬ 
lease 3. It is also a Unix system 
that, via a local-area network 
(LAN) connection, can make the 
entire Unix file structure avail¬ 
able to one or more micros run¬ 
ning MS-DOS or IBM’s PC- 
DOS over a LAN. 

Currently, I have an EXL 
316 on loan from Prime with two 
terminals on it. The 10-MHz 
Wyse Technology WysePC 286 
that I regularly use in the office 
is also connected to the EXL 316 
via Ethernet. When I first 
brought up the whole system, I 
used the PC-Interface to con¬ 
nect the PC to the EXL 316. 

All that is required on the PC 
are two Ethernet device driver 
(*.SYS) files loaded through the 
DEVICE = command in the 
CONFIG.SYS file and the PC- 
Interface software. LOGIN.EXE 
is used with three parameters 
to initiate the connection to the 
EXL 316. From then on, Unix 
files on the EXL 316 appear as 
DOS files on my F: disk. 

Once connected, using the 
PC-DOS XCOPY/S command, I 
simply copied the entire con¬ 
tents of my C: disk to the F: disk. 
Access to the hard disk on the 
EXL 316 over the Ethernet con¬ 
nection was nearly as fast as ac¬ 
cessing my local hard disk on the 
WysePC 286. 

After logging off the USER1 
account via the PC-Interface 
over Ethernet, I was able to log 
on to USER1 as a regular Unix 
account on one of the terminals 
connected to the EXL 316. The 
DOS directories and files I’d 
copied from my C: disk on the PC 
could then be in the /USR/ 
USERl directory. 

Then, by typing the Merge/ 
386 command DOS, I could start 
MS-DOS directly under Unix 
on the terminal attached to the 
EXL 316. It comes up in the 
DOS C: USR/USER1 directory. 

The bottom line is that 
Prime’s EXL 316, equipped with 
Merge/386 software and con¬ 
nected to personal computers 
with PC-Interface software, 
provides a spectacular array of 
options for moving between 
DOS and Unix. 


Chip set 

FROM PAGE 33 

set uses CMOS technology, 
which should help bring AT com¬ 
patibility to new markets — in¬ 
cluding the laptop area — ac¬ 
cording to Raj Jaswa, senior 
product marketing manager at 
Intel. 

EMS a Neat feature 

Neat integrates the Lotus/Intel/ 
Microsoft Expanded Memory 
Specification (EMS), a capability 
currently not available in the 
PS/2 series, according to a Chips 
and Technologies spokesman. 
The product is compatible with 
Microsoft Corp.’s MS-DOS and 
IBM’s PC-DOS in addition to 
IBM and Microsoft’s OS/2 oper¬ 
ating system, he said. 

With most users planning to 
operate under MS- and PC-DOS 
for the next few years, memory 
above 1M byte has had little val¬ 
ue in current implementations. 
Systems centered around Neat, 
however, treat memory above 
1M byte as EMS, which can be 
useful for applications requiring 
large data storage, such as Lotus 
Development Corp.’s 1-2-3. 

Access to EMS will be useful 
for AT and compatible users run¬ 
ning OS/2, Intel’s Jaswa noted, 
because it is so memory-inten¬ 
sive. The multitasking operating 
system, together with IBM’s 
Presentation Manager, will re¬ 
quire about 1.5M bytes of mem¬ 
ory just for the program code. 

OS/2 for the masses 

“A lot of people think OS/2 will 
be running only on PS/2, but as 
several compatible makers have 
recently made clear, OS/2 will 
also be running on AT-type ma¬ 
chines,” Jaswa said. 


Chips and Technologies made 
Neat fully bus-compatible with 
IBM’s PC XT and AT through a 
technique called dynamic bus- 
clock switching that allows the 
bus to run asynchronously with 
the processor. Therefore, if an 
add-on card responds at 8 MHz, 
a user can continue to run his AT 
at 12 or 16 MHz. 

Another technique used to 
make the chip set compatible 
was configurable command de¬ 
lay, which allows time for add-on 
cards to respond. The bus will 
provide 12.5-MHz, one-wait 
state throughput and still main¬ 
tain compatibility, according to 
the company. 

Gets along with VGA 

The CS8245 VGA chip set 
works with all the modes used in 
IBM’s recently announced VGA, 
which is used in the PS/2 Models 
50, 60 and 80. The two-chip set 
also supports IBM’s 31.5-KHz 
analog monitors as well as cur¬ 
rently used EGA, Color Graphics 
Adapter, Hercules Computer 
Technology, Inc., NEC Corp. 
Multisync-type and mono¬ 
chrome monitors. 

The VGA chip set operates at 
a standard clock frequency of 30 
MHz with a 38-MHz option 
available. The product provides 
graphics resolution of 1,024 by 
768 or 800 by 600 pixels. Evalu¬ 
ation samples are currently 
available, according to Johanna 
Ohlsson, the product’s market¬ 
ing manager. 

The Neat chip set costs 
$108.90 for the 12-MHz version 
and $136.80 for the 16-MHz 
edition in quantities of 100. Like 
the VGA chip set, Neat is avail¬ 
able in evaluation samples. The 
product will be available in pro¬ 
duction quantities in November, 
the vendor said. 


NEED TO WRITE 
A 


DISASTER 
RECOVERY PLAN?? 


DON'T REINVENT THE WHEEI_ 

CALL FOR YOUR FREE 

PRACTICAL GUIDE 
TO 

DISASTER RECOVERY PLANNING 

AND ASK ABOUT OUR PLANNING ''KIT'' 

Business Recovery Systems, Inc. 


Zachmann is vice-president of research 
at International Data Corp. 


1(800) 654 2493 (303) 298 5320 


COMPUTERWORLD 


AUGUST 10,1987 






















MICROCOMPUTING 


Old pro 808 $ 

FROM PAGE 33 

counterparts this year, accord¬ 
ing to Norman DeWitt, a Data- 
quest analyst. He predicts that 
4.8 million 8088-based systems 
will be shipped, compared with 
1.3 million 286s. 

While PC makers concede 
that the 286 will, in the words of 
one manufacturer, be “the chip 
of the decade,” they report that 
demand for 8088-based ma¬ 
chines is healthy. Michael Ama- 
dio, director of computer prod¬ 
ucts at Cordata, Inc., says 
demand for his firm’s 8088- 
based PCs is three times greater 
than the firm forecast this year. 
He declines to state actual ship¬ 
ment figures. 

“When what you want it to do 
doesn’t require a 286, custom¬ 
ers will stick with a proven tech¬ 
nology,” Amadio says. “Some¬ 
times I wonder if people just 
aren’t more comfortable with 
what’s already out there. We in 
the industry are always looking 
toward the newer and greater, 
but I don’t think that’s always 
the case with the user.” 

In what serves as a tribute to 
the viability of 8088 technology, 
a number of manufacturers have 
introduced microcomputers in 
that class in recent months — 
among them Tandy Corp., Ze¬ 
nith Data Systems and Cordata. 
Manufacturers have enhanced 
their 8088-based PCs to im¬ 
prove on the earlier models’ 
storage capabilities, processing 
speeds and screen resolutions. 

The primary appeal of the 
8088-based machines seems to 
be their relatively low cost. 

It takes you there 

“Why do you drive a Toyota 
rather than a Corvette? It’s be¬ 
cause what you drive takes you 
there,” says Ed Juge, director of 
market planning at Tandy. 

Corporate users are employ¬ 
ing 8088s as nodes in local-area 
networks (LAN) and as worksta¬ 
tions for simple word processing 
and the occasional spreadsheet. 

Marge Lakin, manager of op¬ 
erations administration at mo¬ 
torcycle manufacturer Kawasaki 
Heavy Industries, Ltd., says her 
company purchased 900 8088- 
based PCs from Zenith late last 
year. The PCs are being used in a 
network linking dealers to Ka¬ 
wasaki’s U.S. headquarters in Ir¬ 
vine, Calif. 


COOPERATIVE 

PROCESSING 

with Enter/3270 
The simple PC front 
end for any existing 
3270 Mainframe 
applications. No host 
changes required. 

Aspen Research 
(415) 340-1588 


Through the use of the PCs, 
dealers may order parts from 
Kawasaki’s corporate headquar¬ 
ters. “The technology is fine for 
what we’re doing,” Lakin says. 
“And cost was a consideration.” 

However, Tom Eagan, vice- 
president of office systems at 
Wells Fargo Bank NA, says his 
company opted for 80286-based 
IBM Personal Computer AT 
compatibles in the bank’s net¬ 


work, which links its loan offi¬ 
cers to corporate headquarters. 
“The crystal ball as we see it led 
us to the 286,” Eagan says. “It 
affords us a longer life cycle. Ap¬ 
plications using artificial intelli¬ 
gence, for example, will [make] 
obsolete the 8088.” However, 
Eagan says he will not discard 
the company’s 150 8088-based 
PCs. 

The expected decline in 


prices of 286-based PCs will cut 
deeply into the market for 8088- 
based systems. How long the 
8088 PC will survive is a ques¬ 
tion open to debate. 

“I think it will survive well 
into the 1990s,” Dataquest’s 
DeWitt says. “It’ll shift into dif¬ 
ferent markets — it’ll probably 
become stronger in homes and 
schools — and the shipments 
will begin to decrease.” 


Others, however, are not so 
optimistic. 

“I think there’s a future for 
the 8088. It’s a question of 
where and for how long,” says 
Steven Holtzman, director of 
systems marketing at Wyse 
Technology. “By 1989, the 
price of the 286 should come 
down enough so there will be lit¬ 
tle rationale for anyone to con¬ 
tinue buying an 8088.” 



“We need terminals that deliver full 
performance and still enhance the 
look of our systems.” 

Director, Information Systems 

“Let’s not forget about reliability. 

Our terminals need to be cost- 
effective and offer a good return 
on our investment.” 

Manager, Corporate Finance 



Introducing the QVT® PLUS family. 
Because you can please all of the people 

all of the time. 


And the QVT 101 PLUS. The 
cost-effective choice for business 
applications. 

The QVT PLUS family line. 
Because we listen. For more 
information, call QUME today 
at (800) 223-2479. 

Find out how far we’ll go to 
please you. 

Qiime. 

2350 Qume Drive 
San Jose, California 95131 

THE COMPANY WITH PERIPHERAL VISION , 

©1987 QUME Corporation. DEC is a trademark of Digital Equipment Corporation. ANSI is designed to American National Standards Institute, Inc. .ANSI X3.64-1979 guidelines. 


Creating a new family of 
terminals to meet the growing 
demands of business today is 
no easy task. 

It takes experience. 

It demands innovation—and 
attention to detail. 

Most of all it requires listening 
to our customers. Interaction 
between us and you, the people 
who buy and use QUME® 
products. 

And our listening has paid off. 


Now, with over one million 
QUME products installed world¬ 
wide, we have the right terminals 
for virtually every business 
application. 

QUME’s QVT® PLUS line of 
terminals offer the ultimate com¬ 
bination of form and function. 
Take the QVT 203 PLUS. Our 
high-performance, fully DEC- 
compatible ANSI terminal. 

The QVT 119 PLUS. For high- 
end, full-function ASCII 
environments. 


AUGUST 10,1987 


COMPUTERWORLD 


35 
































MICROCOMPUTING 


Motorola 

FROM PAGE 33 

Motorola doesn’t make too 
many benchmark claims of its 
own. 

They’ve also come out with a 
hardware graphics controller. 
We don’t need one. The 68020 
is the graphics controller. The 
68000 has bit-manipulation in¬ 
structions. The 386 does not. 

So in addition to the basic 
speed difference, there 
are other important dif¬ 
ferences as well? 

Browne: Yes. [Differences in¬ 
clude] the bit-manipulation in¬ 
structions, the addressing 
modes and the general-purpose 
registers. 

Nutt: What really upset us 
was Intel’s claim that the 386 
has general-purpose registers. I 
can prove to you that they only 
have one or two general-purpose 
registers. It is exactly the same 
dedicated register set as the [In¬ 
tel] 8086. All they did was ex¬ 
tend it to 32 bits. It’s crazy. No¬ 
body looked at it. They take the 
word of Intel. 

When will the 68030 ship 
in volume and start ap¬ 
pearing in systems that 
end users can buy? 

Browne: We go into manufactur¬ 
ing in the fourth quarter, and I 
expect the ramp to be much, 
much faster. I expect to see 
products show up in the market¬ 
place during the fourth quarter 
from a number of the smaller 
firms that move very rapidly into 
the marketplace. Concerning 
the larger firms, we’ve already 
had statements from NCR 
[Corps’s Tower group, Sun Mi¬ 
crosystems, [Inc.] and John Scul- 
ley at Apple [Computer, Inc.] 
that the 68030 will be integrated 
into their product lines. 

Clearly, a major problem 
for Motorola is that MS- 
DOS was written for the 
Intel family, not the 68000 
series of chips. Now that 
IBM and Microsoft are 
writing OS/2 for the Intel 
80286, how can you com¬ 
bat that problem? 

Nutt: First of all, OS/2 for the 
286 is possibly coming out in 
mid-1988. So that would be writ¬ 
ten for the protected mode of the 
286 and not utilize the 32-bit en¬ 
vironment. The 386 32-bit envi¬ 


ronment would not be available 
until 1989, and the applications 
for that won’t be available until 
1990. Our customers can’t wait 
that long. 

But they say, “I’d like to be 
able to offer my customers MS- 
DOS capability.” To date, the 
only way that has been solved is 
by add-in 286 cards. Those are 
expensive solutions. They’re 
$2,000 to $5,000. Now, we’ve 


worked very closely with two 
vendors: Phoenix Technologies 
Ltd. and Insignia, based in the 
UK. Those companies have basi¬ 
cally developed emulation soft¬ 
ware that runs on the 68020 that 
totally emulates the IBM Per¬ 
sonal Computer. So you can take 
MS-DOS and run it (Erectly. 

Sun has relied on the 
68000 family for its work¬ 


stations but recently intro¬ 
duced a high-end work¬ 
station built around a 10 
million instructions per 
second, reduced instruc¬ 
tion set computing (RISC) 
chip. Why would Sun, or 
any other workstation 
vendor, need to look out¬ 
side Motorola’s 68000 
family for its processors? 
Browne: Sun is a computer com¬ 


pany, and they see their compet¬ 
itors as [Digital Equipment 
Corp.] and IBM. If you’re going 
to compete, you’re going to com¬ 
pete with the players. So Sun’s 
looking at a broad range of price/ 
performance. As they an¬ 
nounced their RISC efforts, 
which they said they’ll ship this 
year, they said that the 68000 
family would continue to be the 
workhorse for them. 


Important Breakthroughs From Candle 




-, 

What are my CICS problems? 


p WSHI Work»ng Set Size 7306K 

•HIGH* 

I OSHI 97% ot OSA used 

•HIGH* ' 

* NDMP Number ot transaction dumps 31 

•HIGH* 

^_ 



I m 


saga a a a a a a 



/. Identify a yottnditd fwbleni 
kH-k Bxcepfim Atttluvi. 


U 




AW Company Systems , . Speed „ (#w 
Transaclions 

o , n fa ^ ,0nS? 

Response Time 

Response t j me / as , 5 ln 

today s ?espo„ 3 s°e m ;^ es 

Pr °WH em Analysis 

W "o U e s|'ow?n8 C do^ S C| r c U s nn ; s "9 Slowly? 


CICS System 






Your CICS customers are crying for better service.... 
And you’re responding as fast as you can. But somehow 
it’s never fast enough. 

If only there were a fast way to get solutions to potential 
problems before they lead to customer complaints. 

Now there is. It’s as easy as 1,2,3 with a series of 
breakthroughs from Candle. 


2 ‘ a qottbnt noth 
Men Ment/s. 


Exception Analysis 

Exception Analysis automatically warns you about 
abnormal hardware or software conditions—in plenty 
of time to avoid potential outages or severe slowdowns. 
And, color coding makes the exception messages clear 
and easy to read. 

Speed View Menus 

Once you know you’ve got a problem, our new Speed 


COMPUTERWORLD 


AUGUST 10,1987 


VM/CMS USERS 

Developing Applications? 

Use XMENU/E for 
Total Full-Screen Support. 

• Powerful REXX interface 

• Fast screen painter 

• High-level language support 

• Extensive validity checking 

• Complete 3270 support 
Call Now: 408 / 980-9414 
Kolinar Corporation 

3064 Scott Blvd., Santa Clara CA 95054 


36 























MICROCOMPUTING 


NEW PRODUCTS 


Systems 

A 16- to 20-MHz, zero-wait 
state IBM Personal Computer- 
compatible microcomputer has 
been announced by CSS Lab¬ 
oratories, Inc. 

The CSS 386 Personal 


Computer features one 32-bit 
memory slot and five 16-bit and 
two eight-bit expansion slots. 
On-board memory starts with 
1M byte of static-column ran¬ 
dom-access memory upgradable 
to 2M bytes. 

The CSS 386 Personal Com¬ 
puter is priced at $2,495. 


CSS Laboratories, 2134 S. 
Ritchey St., Santa Ana, Calif. 
92705. 


Software utilities 

Graphics terminal emulation 
software designed to support the 
IBM Personal System/2 Video 
Graphics Array graphics proces¬ 
sor and video controller has been 
announced by Microplot, Inc. 


PC-Plot-IV Plus offers such 
graphics capabilities as 256 col¬ 
ors, a graphics screen dump to 
Hewlett-Packard Co. LaserJet 
printers and ASCII and Xmodem 
file transfer. It is said to enable 
the personal computer to appear 
to a mainframe as a Digital 
Equipment Corp. VT100, 
VT200 orVT52. 

The user can exit PC-Plot-IV 
Plus leaving the remote host 


connection intact and run other 
IBM PC-DOS applications. 

PC-Plot-IV Plus is priced at 
$225. 

Microplot, 659H Park Mead¬ 
ow Road, Westerville, Ohio 
43081. 


NEW AT 
S I G G R A P H 




CICS Performance Problems 

1 , 2 , 3 - 



3- Pinpoint tk Source of M 
problem ii/M Impact jloplec. 


View Menus let you press a key and look directly into 
your CICS system so you can immediately answer 
questions about transactions, response time, and 
problem analysis. 

Impact Profiles 

Press another key for Impact Profiles. Within seconds 
you can pinpoint exactly which resources and work¬ 
loads are impacting CICS. 


Members of your DP team will get the information they 
need to head off response problems. Operations gets 
instantaneous answers to: what transactions are run¬ 
ning now, what is the response time, and who is slowing 
down CICS? System programmers get equally rapid 
responses to: how are batch jobs, I/O, the CPU, and 
storage impacting CICS performance? 

DB2 Support, Enhanced Background Reporting, 
and More! 

Other exciting breakthroughs include support for DB2 
and third party data bases, plus enhanced background 
reporting tailorable for managers, operations, and 
systems programmers. 

Easy-to-use Recommendations provide valuable infor¬ 
mation fast about preventing and solving most CICS 
performance problems. And they can be customized 
to reflect the way you and your DP team tackle CICS 
performance problems. 

Why not see for yourself? Call Terry Forbes at (800) 
843-3970 for details on the latest breakthroughs in 
the Candle family of fully integrated performance man¬ 
agement products. Remember.. .when it comes to solv¬ 
ing complex CICS performance problems—or those in 
MVS, IMS, and VM—Candle makes it easy as 1,2,3- 


I Candle® 

Candle Corporation 

1999 Bundy Drive, Los Angeles, CA 90025 

Copy right © 1987 Candle Corporation. All rights reserved 


An IBM Personal Computer AT- 
based graphics-controller card 
featuring four internal pixel 
planes with resolutions of 1,280 
by 1,280 pixels each was an¬ 
nounced by Kontron Electron¬ 
ics, Inc. The 7000CB card is 
priced from $2,995. Kontron, 
630 Clyde Ave., Mountain View, 
Calif. 94039. 

The Xcel-8000, an Intel 
Corp. 80386-based presenta¬ 
tion-graphics design and produc¬ 
tion system said to combine a de¬ 
sign station with an imaging 
management station, was an¬ 
nounced by Autographix, Inc. 
Prices start at $150,000. Auto¬ 
graphix, 100 Fifth Ave., Wal¬ 
tham, Mass. 02154. 

An AT-compatible arithmetic 
frame grabber, said to store and 
process up to 16 512- by 512- by 
8-bit images in real time, was an¬ 
nounced by Data Translation, 
Inc. The DT2861 costs 
$4,995. Data Translation, 100 
Locke Drive, Marlboro, Mass. 
01752. 

A single-board coprocessor 
family for the AT, said to exe¬ 
cute computation-intensive vec¬ 
tor and scalar operations at 
speeds of up to 20 million float¬ 
ing-point operations per second, 
was announced by Mercury 
Computer Systems, Inc. The 
MC3200 Series is priced from 
$6,500. Mercury, 600 Suffolk 
St., Lowell, Mass. 01854. 

Wingraph, a Microsoft 
Corp. Windows-compatible pre¬ 
sentation-graphics program, 
was introduced by Media Cy¬ 
bernetics, Inc. It is priced at 
$99.95. Media Cybernetics, 
Suite 2000, 8484 Georgia Ave., 
Silver Spring, Md. 20910. 

Image capture and paint capa¬ 
bilities have been added to the 
Starburst AT-based graphics 
workstation, Pansophic Sys¬ 
tems, Inc. has announced. The 
basic Starburst system costs 
$32,500. The image-capture op¬ 
tion price starts at $12,000. 
Pansophic, 709 Enterprise 
Drive, Oak Brook, Ill. 60521. 


COBOL SHOP 

COMPILERS AND TOOLS 
FOR DOS. UNIX, CICS 
AND MORE 

FORMS, DBMS, 

QA TOOLS ETC. 

TOP MANUFACTURERS, 
BEST PRICES 

CALL 

THE COBOL SHOP 
1-800-555-0768 
TX: 713-775-5080 


AUGUST 10,1987 


COMPUTERWORLD 


37 


















































































Gabriel Benchmark Tfest: Performance Compariso 


BOYER 


BROWSE 


PUZZLE 


TRAVERSE 

INIT 


TRAVERSE 


DESTRU 


10.0 


12.0 


0.0 2.0 
X FASTER 
■ Symbolics 3620E 


4.0 6.0 

□ Sun 3/160M 


Symbolics. Symbolics 3SSO and Genera are trademarks of Symbolics. Inc. UNIX is a trademark of American Telephone and Telegraph. 
































automatically process different datatypes 
with built-in error detection, and process 
multiple operations in parallel for faster 
operation—faster than any other systems 
in their class. 

In the real world of applications develop¬ 
ment, the true test of any system is not only 
its speed, but more importantly, the reliabil¬ 
ity of the information it processes. With all 
other systems, to get speed you must sacri¬ 
fice the assurance of reliability. Only 
Symbolics gives you both. 

What Benchmarks won’t show you 

Benchmarks only measure processing 
speed. The key ingredient to faster software 
development is programmer productivity. 
With Symbolics systems, programs can be 
developed from 5-50 times faster than with 
conventional workstations. That’s because 
Symbolics’ Genera™ software environment 
provides over 40 times as many built-in 
facilities as systems offering just a Common 
Lisp compiler. These pre-written “mini 
programs” shorten development time and 

"Comparably configured and priced systems. 


grate AI into existing environments. A3t 
With one simple command you 11 
access information from, and communicate 
transparently with UNIX™ Digital, and 
IBM® systems. And using Symbolics work¬ 
stations, you’ll write software fast, in Com¬ 
mon Lisp, Prolog, Fortran-77, Pascal or Ada? 

Best price/performance 

Getting up to 34 times the performance 
from Symbolics won’t cost you more. In fact, 
Symbolics lists for less than most other 
systems in every class. And as you go up in 
class, the price difference becomes even 
greater. 

Give us a call today. We’ll tell you how 
Symbolics can greatly reduce your time to 
market for new products, and your costs, 
through increased programmer productivity 
and the best price/performance workstation 
available. 

Symbolics. 11 Cambridge Center, 

Cambridge, MA 02142. 

1 - 800 - 237-2401 

In Colorado: 1-800-233-6083 


symbolics 


From Symbolics, you can expect the fast¬ 
est AI and advanced software development 
workstation in its class. 

To prove this, we matched our 3620E in 
a standard benchmark test with a represen¬ 
tative workstation from the same class.* 

The results, as you can see, weren’t even 
close. Symbolics ran anywhere from 5 to 
34 times faster in every category. 

Why Symbolics is so fast 

Like other manufacturers, Symbolics 
supports IEEE 32-bit floating point and 
numeric processing. But we go a step further 
by adding four turbo-charged bits. When 
combined with our unique hardware archi¬ 
tecture, these extra bits allow Symbolics 
workstations to compact applications data, 


increase reliability since programmers don’t 
have to write them. 

And Symbolics offers automatic data-type 
checking at run-time, advanced debugging, 
smart garbage collection, automatic memory 
management, the fastest edit-compile-debug 
loop available, and full support of object- 
oriented programming. These allow for rapid 
prototyping, and enable programmers to 
solve complex problems faster than ever. 

Fast, reliable team-oriented software 
development 

Symbolics also offers the fastest team- 
oriented software development —even in 
multi-vendor environments. That’s because 
Symbolics supports a full range of industry 
standard protocols and languages to inte- 


i 


i 


IBM is a trademark of International Business Machines Corporation. Ada is a registered trademark of the U.S. Department of Defense. 













For 25 years, our networks have prevented 
gray hain cured ulcers and lowered blood pressure. 

Oh yes. and improved communications. 



As a communications man¬ 
ager, you want a networking 
company that can eliminate 
your communications prob¬ 
lems. And the stress that goes 
along with them. 

Which is why we suggest 
you turn your problems over 
to a company that has been 
doing that since 1962. 

Codex. 


When we say we 
wrote the book on 
networking we 
mean it. Literally. 


We’re the preferred vend- 
or in the industry. In the most 
recent Data Communications 
magazine subscriber brand 
preference study, for example, 
Codex was cited as the 
number one choice for net¬ 
working products ranging 
from multiplexers to modems 
to network management 
systems. 

That’s why 97% of 
the Fortune 100 depend on 
Codex for networking 
answers. 

You see, we’ve spent the 


past 25 years working with 
people like you to address 
connectivity issues, analyze 
growth options, balance 
transmission costs against 
increased user demands, and 
keep up with rapidly changing 
standards and technologies. 

We know that your com¬ 
pany probably already has 
hardware commitments 
1 investments that can’t 
simply be 
discarded. 
That’s 

why we work 
within multi¬ 
vendor envi¬ 
ronments. 
So regard¬ 
less of 
which ven¬ 
dors the 

pieces or your network 
come from, or where they are, 
we have the experience to max¬ 
imize their performance and 
functionality. 

And we continue our 
active involvement with 
industry standards commit¬ 
tees, helping to create an 
“open architecture” that will 
help you link equipment in 
the future. 

All this experience in the 
field of networking has given us 
enough knowledge and under¬ 
standing to write a book. 

So we did. 



When you call Customer 
Service, you've got the whole 
company on the line. 


The 

Basics Book m = 
of Data Com- 
munications 
is an inform¬ 
ative guide 
to the ins 
and outs of 
networking. 

To qualify for your free 
copy, as well as to find out 
what Codex can do for your 
applications, simply call 
Codex 1-800-4264212, 
Ext, 252. In Europe, call 
32-2-6608980. Or write to 
Codex Corporation, Dept. 
707-52, Maresfield Farm, 

7 Blue Hill River Road, 

Canton, 



JL 

- - W 


MA 02021- 
1097. 
After 25 
years, we 
3^ know 
what 
to do 
for 


At Codex, we don’t have set solutions - we work VOUr 
with your current environment. Which is why we ' 
spend a lot of time drawing diagrams like this. COITI- 

munications system. More im¬ 
portantly, we know what to do 
for your nervous system. 



codex 


<S> MOTOROLA 

The Networking Experts 

Visit Codex at TCA September 29-October 2, booth # 228-231. 


© 1987 Codex Corporation. Motorola and ® are trademarks of Motorola, Inc. Codex is a registered trademark of Codex Corporation. Sales offices in more than 40 countries worldwide. In Europe call 32-2-6608980, in Canada 416-793-5700, in the Far East 852-5-666706 (in Japan 
81-3-5848101), in the Americas 617-364-2000.1BM is a registered trademark of International Business Machines Corp. DEC is a registered trademark of Digital Equipment Corporation. AT & T is a registered trademark of American Telephone and Telegraph Co. 















NETWORKING 


J 


Banks moving toward EDI services 

Aim tocapitalize on investments in corporatecommunicationslinks 


DATA 

STREAM 



Clare Fleig 


LAN vendors 
linking up 

As users move from stand¬ 
alone departmental local-area 
networks (LAN) to company¬ 
wide communications systems, 
traditional LAN vendors are in¬ 
creasingly turning to mergers 
and strategic alliances as a way 
to meet their customers’ com¬ 
plex needs. 

Corporate networks often 
consist of multiple interconnect¬ 
ed LANs that provide enter¬ 
prisewide connectivity services, 
including access to telecom¬ 
munications networks and cor¬ 
porate hosts. This requires in¬ 
tegration of a wide variety of 
products, including IBM Per¬ 
sonal Computer LANs, Trans¬ 
mission Control Protocol/In¬ 
ternet Protocol networks that 
connect multiple hosts, micro- 
to-mainframe links and telecom¬ 
munications gateways. 

But until recently, vendors 
specialized in one or two of the 
above products. As a result, 
LANs that were generally billed 
as solving all of the corpora¬ 
tion’s ills more often than not 
contributed to MIS headaches. 
Even when they worked smooth- 
Continued on page 43 


BY MITCH BETTS 

CW STAFF 


The nation’s largest banks are 
preparing to stake out positions 
as vendors in the blossoming 
electronic data interchange 
(EDI) industry. 

The banks want to provide 
EDI services for their corporate 
customers during the next two 
or three years, according to Mi¬ 
chael T. Manion, manager of 
treasury services in the Chicago 
office of Coopers & Lybrand, an 


accounting and consulting firm. 

Some banks view the move 
into EDI as a defensive strategy 
necessary to retain their role as 
intermediaries for corporate fi¬ 
nancial transactions. Others may 
develop EDI products as part of 
an aggressive strategy to offer a 
variety of computer-based busi¬ 
ness services, Manion said. 

Twelve major banks recently 
hired Coopers & Lybrand to 
study the EDI market, which 
uses the ANSI X.12 data com¬ 
munications standard to ex¬ 


change orders and invoices as 
well as handle other transactions 
between companies. 

“The main thrust of the study 
is to determine what corporate 
customers’ requirements are in 
EDI, what opportunities there 
are for banks to provide EDI ser¬ 
vices and then to give bankers 
the information they need for 
product planning and develop¬ 
ment purposes,” said Manion, 
who is coordinating the study. 

Due Sept. 3, the report will be 
Continued on page 46 


Gateway 
opens up 
to Novell 

BY PATRICIA KEEFE 

CW STAFF 


IRVINE, Calif. — In an effort to 
widen its market, Gateway Com¬ 
munications, Inc. recently 
backed off from its proprietary 
network foundation and opened 
up its gateway and bridge prod¬ 
ucts to support Novell, Inc. Ad¬ 
vanced Netware-based net¬ 
works. 

Gateway’s G/Net network 
utilizes a customized version of 
Netware and supports a set of 
protocols used by the core 
Netware product. G/Net users 
will now be able to communicate 
with versions of Netware cus¬ 
tomized for an estimated 37 lo¬ 
cal-area networks, as well as 
gain access to more than 4,000 
Netware-compatible multiuser 
applications, the company said. 

Gateway further buttressed 
its personal computer network 
family by announcing modular 
products designed to provide 
wide-area networking and net- 
Contin ued on page 42 


Inside 

• Network Software Asso¬ 
ciates migrates software 
packages to IBM PS/2. Page 
42. 

• A group of vendors studies 
the possibility of standardiz¬ 
ing IEEE 802.3 twisted-pair 
Ethernet. Page 44. 


CORPORATEWIDE NETWORKS 

Sears cashes in with SNA 


BY JEAN S. BOZMAN 

CW STAFF 


I n the light of IBM’s Systems Network 
Architecture (SNA), Sears, Roebuck 
and Co.’s Communications 
Network has done every¬ 
thing right. During the last 
three years, the Chicago-based 
company forged a private net¬ 
work throughout the continental 
U.S., Hawaii and Puerto Rico us¬ 
ing state-of-the-art IBM archi¬ 
tecture. 

Key elements of the network 
seem as up-to-date as IBM’s 
June announcements on network 
architecture. IBM’s Netview is 
the glue that links 60,000 de¬ 
vices nationwide, including 50 IBM 3720s, 
105 IBM 3725s, 2,000 Series/ls in 800 



Sears’ Weis 


plexers 


Sears stores and 100 host computers in 35 
data centers. Eighteen months ago, before 
IBM’s strategic alliance with Network 
Equipment Technologies Corp. (NET) was 
announced, Sears began to add Tl multiplex¬ 
ers from NET to its network. 
There are now 18 such sites na¬ 
tionwide. 

In fact, the network could not 
have been built without IBM’s 
active cooperation, say those 
who designed it. “We have a 
partnership relationship with 
IBM,” says Gerard Weis, vice- 
president of data communica¬ 
tions and software services at 
Sears. “IBM and NET worked 
with us in 1986 to facilitate our 
connection of the NET multi- 
with IBM’s network manage- 
Continuedon page 45 


printf("Hello 


0***, 

, world\n 

A 



5 


Meet the Industry’s 
New Standard for 
Mainframe C Compilers 


i 






SAS Institute Inc. announces a 
mainframe version of the Lattice® C 
compiler—your key to truly portable 
applications. 

With our compiler, you can develop C 
programs on IBM 370 machines, in¬ 
terface easily with non-C programs 
and software packages, and protect 


your programming investment across 
operating environments. Virtually 
every new computer supports C, and 
portable programs created with the 
mainframe compiler under OS or 
CMS will run on any other machine 
with a C compiler. 

The mainframe compiler uses stan¬ 
dard IBM linkage conventions. Assem¬ 
bler programs, MAIN routines in 
other high-level languages, and 
packages such as IBM’s ISPF and 
GDDM can be invoked directly from C. 


And you can use C, instead of 
assembler, to develop small 
and fast subroutines called from 
other languages. 

We designed the compiler listing and 
cross-reference to make programs 
easy to follow and errors easy to find. 
An extensive library offers functions 
from Kemighan and Ritchie and the 
Lattice PC C compiler. The run-time 
library produces explicit numbered 
error messages and a traceback of ac¬ 
tive function calls if an error occurs. 


For all the facts—including details on 
economical annual licensing com¬ 
plete with free technical support and 
enhancements—call your Software 
Sales Representative today. 

SAS is a registered trademark of SAS Institute Inc 
Lattice is a registered trademark of Lattice. Inc 

Copvnght © 1986 bv SAS Institute Inc Printed in 
the USA 


SAS Institute Inc. 

Box 8000 □ SAS Circle 
Carv, NC 27511-8000 
Phone (919) 467-8000 
Fax (919) 469-3737 



AUGUST 10,1987 


COMPUTERWORLD 


41 
































NETWORKING 


BIT BLAST 

Network Software migrates packages to PS/2 


Network Software Associates, Inc. 
in Laguna Hills, Calif., recently migrated 
all nine of its software packages to IBM’s 
Personal System/2, reportedly allowing 
IBM Personal Computers to communi¬ 
cate with one another and with IBM hosts 
via IBM’s Systems Network Architecture 
software. The company claims to offer 
the first PS/2-to-PS/2 link based on Syn¬ 
chronous Data Link Control and the first 
LU6.2 and RJE packages for PS/2s at¬ 
tached to an IBM 3274 or 3174 control¬ 
ler. The packages were designed to run 
on a variety of modem and terminal emu¬ 
lation boards. 


Micom Systems, Inc.’s Interlan divi¬ 
sion has signed an OEM agreement to use 
Network General Corp.’s Sniffer Pro¬ 
tocol Analyzer. The Sniffer reportedly 
pinpoints network bottlenecks by moni¬ 
toring packets as they travel over the net¬ 
work. Under the terms of the agreement, 
Micom-Interlan, Inc. will remarket 
Sniffer as part of its Ethernet local-area 
network (LAN) product line under the 
name LAN Detector. 

Data Switch Corp. in Shelton, Conn., 
has joined the throng of companies sup¬ 
porting IBM’s Netview network manage¬ 


ment system. The company recently an¬ 
nounced plans to link its communications 
switching and control products up with 
IBM’s Netview, via the firm’s Net- 
view/PC interface. The first product with 
Netview/PC support will be available by 
this fall, Data Switch said. 

About a third of the companies that have 
gotten beyond the starter-kit stage with 
Manufacturing Automation Protocol 
(MAP) are slowing down their MAP 
plans, according to Advanced Manu¬ 
facturing Research. The Salem, 
Mass., company surveyed approximately 


30 firms that have MAP networks with 
more than two or three nodes and found 
that 35% of these installations were tak¬ 
ing longer than expected. Companies be¬ 
hind schedule cited late vendor shipments 
as the cause of delay in 55% of the cases; 
waiting for MAP Version 3.0 in 30%; and 
other reasons, such as lack of confor¬ 
mance testing and internal implementa¬ 
tion problems, in 15% of the cases. 

Network Research Corp. has added a 
Netbios interface to its Fusion Network 
Software, permitting applications written 
for the IBM PC Network program to run 
across a Transmission Control Protocol/ 
Internet Protocol network. The option is 
scheduled to be available during the 
fourth quarter. 




TPX/VM (Terminal Productivity 
Executive) is a full-function session 
manager specifically developed for 
users of ACF/VTAM. With TPX/VM, 
you can select desired applications 
from a full-screen menu and have 
simultaneous, active sessions. 
TPX/VM also allows easy switching 
from one application to another 
with a single command or PF key. 

Reducing tedious logon and logoff 
procedures immediately increases 
user and system productivity. “Auto¬ 
mated Conversation Language” 
(ACL) lets you pre-program your 
responses to standard procedures 
and automatically activate sessions 
when logging on to TPX. And if you 
move to another terminal, TPX/VM’s 
session portability lets you take 
your sessions with you. 

Network Access/VM is an ACF/ 
VTAM application that replaces 
VTAM’s limited CISS (Unformatted 
System Services) Table. It provides 
you with menu-driven access to all 
your applications while maintaining 


Now Showing... 

TPX and Network Access in VM 


application-level security. With 
Network Access/VM, you can com¬ 
municate with other network users 
with system-wide message sending. 

TPX/VM and Network Access/VM 
work effectively in a stand-alone 
or integrated mode to improve the 
productivity of your network users 
and optimize resource usage. TPX 
and Network Access have received 
“rave reviews” from MVS users at 
over 800 sites worldwide. Now 
VM users can experience the same 
benefits. 

To arrange a FREE, 30-day trial 
of TPX/VM or Network Access/VM, 
call toll-free, (800) 323-2600 or 
(412)323-2600 in Pennsylvania. 

DUQUESnE 
SYSTEmS 

Two Allegheny Center 
Pittsburgh, PA 15212 


You Loved Them in MVS 
Now See Them in VM 

TPX/WKfl 

Network Access/V 


Gateway 

CONTINUED FROM PAGE 41 

work performance capabilities. Gateway 
unveiled three products — its first Ether¬ 
net offering, the G/Ethernet adapter 
card, a board-level network server and a 
data base server. 

Gateway has introduced Netware- 
compatible versions of its IBM Systems 
Network Architecture, asynchronous and 
CCITT X.25 gateways and bridge wide- 
area links. The products are said to create 
session-transport protocols in a Netware 
environment to allow shared network ac¬ 
cess to communications facilities. 

The IEEE 802.3-compatible G/Ether¬ 
net is cost-competitive at $395 and fea¬ 
tures 32K-byte random-access memory 
(RAM). “The effect of the increased 
memory will provide our G/Ethernet cus¬ 
tomers with a significant increase in net¬ 
work capacity under heavy work loads,” 
said Walter Schramm, Gateway’s vice- 
president of sales and marketing. 

The initial release supports Netware 
on the file server side, as well as Trans¬ 
mission Control Protocol/Intemet Proto¬ 
col. The networking devices will work 
with RG-59, IBM 3279-style and conven¬ 
tional Ethernet coaxial cables. 

Both the G/Server Engine, said to be 
the first high-speed file server on a card, 
and the G/Database Engine, which en¬ 
hances data bases’ performance, feature 
an on-board Intel Corp. 80196 coproces¬ 
sor with 1M byte of RAM, 64K-byte buff¬ 
er memory and dynamic bad-sector re¬ 
mapping. Each engine supports up to two 
140M-byte disks, or 280M bytes per en¬ 
gine. Users have the option of configuring 
the engines to support disk mirroring, 
which provides continuous disk backup. 
The engines operate independently of the 
host PC, allowing the PC to run its own 
applications. 

The server and data base engines each 
cost $2,150 and are slated to ship next 
month, Gateway said. 


LU 6.2 

It’s a Jungle. 

Let DPS be your Guide. 

REQUIREMENTS 

DESIGN 

IMPLEMENTATION 
TROUBLE SHOOTING 

Dvers.fed (415) 333-6200 

Programming |l W0 C 136 Everson St'eet 

Services me Ul « San Francisco CA 94131 


42 


COMPUTERWORLD 


AUGUST 10,1987 































NETWORKING 


NATIVE MODE DBMS OR DISGUISED VSAM FILES ? 


LAN vendors 

CONTINUED FROM PAGE 41 

ly, LANs seldom provided all the fea¬ 
tures users really needed or wanted. 

So, with competition heating up in the 
corporate networking market and exper¬ 
tise at a premium in key areas like IBM’s 
Systems Network Architecture (SNA) 
and telecommunications, a growing 
number of network vendors are taking 
the merger or strategic alliance route as 
a way to acquire key networking products 
without having to develop them from 
scratch. 

In the last six months, more than a 
dozen communications companies have 
struck deals designed to extend and aug¬ 
ment their product lines. The most recent 
is the proposed merger between Bridge 
Communications, Inc., a terminal-to-host 
vendor, and oft-engaged but never wed 
3Com Corp., a leading LAN vendor. 

Other recent linkups of note include 
Novell, Inc.’s purchase of both micro-to- 
mainframe vendor CXI, Inc. and LAN 
software developer Softcraft, Inc.; Exce- 
lan, Inc.’s acquisition of Kinetics, Inc.; 
and the purchase of Centram Systems 
West, Inc. by Sun Microsystems, Inc. 
Even IBM has chosen to buy — rather 
than develop — technology, signing a 
joint development and marketing agree¬ 
ment with T1 supplier Network Equip¬ 
ment Technologies Corp. in June. 

Crucial to success 

Partnerships have become crucial to 
success in the communications market¬ 
place. Users now realize that no one 
company — not even IBM — can supply 
all the communications products and 
links required to create a large corpor¬ 
atewide network. To be competitive, 
users need, and vendors should supply, 
the following key connections: 

• LANs: This capability should range 
from small department-size LANs to utili¬ 
ty LANs capable of linking departmental 
LANs into a large companywide backbone 
network. 

• SNA: With more than 25,000 SNA 
networks in Fortune 2,000 corporations, 
the ability to supply an SNA gateway be¬ 
tween disparate networks and processors 
is necessary. Agreements such as Tan¬ 
dem Computers, Inc. ’s minority stake in 
Netlink and Altos Computer Systems’ 
purchase of Communications Solutions, 
Inc. late last year are attempts to ad¬ 
dress this niche. 

• Major vendor compatibility: At a mini¬ 
mum, communications vendors will be re¬ 
quired to support products from IBM, 
Digital Equipment Corp. and Apple Com¬ 
puter, Inc. Northern Telecom, Inc. is a 
leader in this area, having signed deals 
with Apple, DEC and Banyan Systems, 
Inc. for wide-area networking products. 

• Telecommunications support: Corpo¬ 
rate short-term requirements call for sup¬ 
porting packet data switching and T1 
connections. Long-term support will en¬ 
compass support for Integrated Services 
Digital Network. 

Given the current communications 
climate in most major corporations, it has 
become increasingly clear that while 
having a viable LAN is still good, sold 
alone, it is just not good enough. 


Fleig is director of systems research specializing in 
local-area networking and IBM communications for 
International Technology Group in Los Altos, 

Calif. 



W hen you look inside most financial soft¬ 
ware applications claiming to speak data 
base, you'll find flat, run-of-the-mill VSAM files. 
VSAM files batch processed into cooperating 
with the DBMS. Without realizing the full power 
of the data base or system software tools. 

BROADEST DATA BASE AND 
DATA DICTIONARY SUPPORT 

Walker Interactive Products is the only finan¬ 
cial software supplier whose entire product line 
can be installed across the full range of data 
base environments. So you make the most of 
your DB2,* ADABAS,* DATACOM,* IDMS,* and 
IMS* investment. Using fourth generation 
languages such as Natural,* IDEAL,* Data- 
query* and ADS/OnLine* you can even 
perform global information queries on your finan¬ 
cial applications—the acid test for real data 
dictionary support! 

WE DID IT RIGHT-FROM THE START 

Walker has had a six-year commitment to 
true data base support—leading the way in our 
industry, not scrambling to catch up. 

Unlike our competitors, we’re not faced with 
years of program rewrites. Environment specific 
code has always resided entirely in Walker's 
unique Software Bridge, rather than in the appli¬ 
cation. The Bridge describes data in the DBMS’ 
natural technique—in relations, hierarchies, or 
networks. 

EASY MIGRATION 

When you change your DBMS (or telepro¬ 
cessing monitor or operating system) you keep 
the same application code and, over a weekend, 
replace the Bridge. Your views of data and 
procedures don’t change. So you’re assured of 
continuity with minimal testing. 

For example, you may want IMS or IDMS 
support today and DB2 support in two years. 
With Walker, you’re fully covered with the 
product you buy today. 

Don’t tinker around with your DBMS 
support. Call Barbara Bond at (415) 495-8811 
or send the attached coupon. 

WALKER INTERACTIVE PRODUCTS 

100 Spear Street 
San Francisco, Calif. 94105 


* DB2 and IMS are trademarks ol IBM ADABAS and Natural are trademarks of Software AG of North 
America. DATACOM. IDEAL, and Dataquery are trademarks of Applied Data Research IDMS and ADS I 
OnLme are trademarks ol CuHinet Software. 


AUGUST 10,1987 


COMPUTERWORLD 


43 






































NETWORKING 



Semiconductor Corp., Intel 
Corp. and Honeywell Bull, Inc. 

The study group will enter¬ 
tain proposals from members, 
several of which are said to be al¬ 
ready working on 10M bit/sec. 
Starlan implementations of their 
own. 

HP technology ready 

HP, for example, has developed 
the technology for implementing 
10M bit/sec. Ethernet on un¬ 
shielded twisted-pair wiring that 
is bundled with other telephone 
wiring, according to Willem Roe- 
landts, general manager of the 
company’s Information Net¬ 
works Group. 

HP’s implementation is plug 
compatible with the 1M bit/sec. 
Starlan standard and supports 
the same distances between 
workstation and wiring closet, so 
that users can install either the 
1M or the 10M bit/sec. network 
in a given installation, Roelandts 
said. 

The importance of a 10M bit/ 
sec. Starlan, Roelandts said, is 
that it allows businesses to use 
existing building wiring schemes 
to support high-speed network¬ 
ing, which will become an impor¬ 
tant consideration for users of 
the new Intel Corp. 80386- 
based generation of microcom¬ 
puters. 

HP hopes to win industry ac¬ 
ceptance for its 10M bit/sec. 
Starlan specifications as part of 
the standard before making a 
formal product introduction, 
Roelandts said. 

Needs support 

The question remains, however, 
as to whether HP can win over 
vendors like 3Com Corp. and 
AT&T, which are also said to be 
working on 10M bit/sec. twist¬ 
ed-pair networks. 

HP and 3Com are currently 
discussing how their respective 
offerings might fit together, ac¬ 
cording to Roelandts. 

Although 3Com did not at¬ 
tend the July IEEE 802.3 stan¬ 
dards committee meeting, the 
company does plan to send rep¬ 
resentatives to the study group’s 
meeting this month, according 
to Andrew Verhalen, 3Com’s di¬ 
rector of marketing for hard¬ 
ware. 

“We’re very interested in 
helping establish a 10M bit/sec. 
twisted-pair wiring standard, 
and we hope that our own prod¬ 
uct will be compatible,” he add¬ 
ed. 


WETtE TAKING ON THE 
WHOLE IBM WORLD. 

ONE PAGE ATATIME. 


No matter which corner of 
IBM's world you work in-3270, 
System/3X, or PC-the PageWriter 
high performance page printer 
will make it brighter. 

Because it brings you the 
best of all worlds: stunning output, 
great economy, and true plug- 
compatibility. No outboard pro¬ 
tocol converters. No extra cabling. 
No black boxes. 

For PC users, the PageWriter 
Model 1080 offers Diablo 630 
and Epson FX-80 emulation. And 
emulation is selectable from the 
front panel, eliminating clumsy 


internal dip-switches. 

The PageWriter Model 3080 
is right at home in 3270 systems. 
It connects via standard coaxial 
cable to any Cluster Controller or 
a 4331 Display Adapter. 

Model 5080, for System 
34/36/38, uses standard twin¬ 
axial connectors, and emulates 
the IBM 5219. 

Both the 3080 and 5080 
PageWriters also have parallel 
interfaces built in, so they can 
share their time with PCs, too. 

And when it comes to per¬ 
formance, the sky's the limit. 


Near typeset-quality text 
at 8 pages a minute. A staggering 
5000 page-per-month duty 
cycle-2000 pages higher than 
the so-called industry standard. 
Plus superb paper handling: 250- 
sheet input and output trays. 

With an optional second input 
hopper, the PageWriter can run 
through up to 500 pages com¬ 
pletely unattended. 

And while that kind of perfor¬ 
mance may seem earth-shattering, 
the PageWriter's operation is as 
near-silent as you can get. 

So let a PageWriter make a 
world of difference to whatever 
IBM you live with.To find your 
nearest Datasouth distributor, 
call us at 800-222-4528. 


Datasouth 

AMERICA’S HIGH PERFORMANCE 
PRINTER COMPANY 

PO. Box 240947, Charlotte, NC 28224 • (704) 523-8500 • Tlx: 6843018, DASO UW • Sales: 1-800-222-4528 • Service: 1-800-438-5050 • West Coast Office: (415) 940-9828 

IBM is a registered trademark of International Business Machines Corporation 


ATTENTION: 

UNHAPPY USERS OF NCR COMPUTER 
HARDWARE AND SOFTWARE 
Our firm specializes in providing expert witness/ 
consulting assistance to firms preparing to sue the 
NCR Corporation. We represent numerous clients 
litigating against NCR. We were directly involved in 
a $2.5 million judgement against NCR. awarded to a 
former NCR user We would like to find other firms 
who, like many of our clients, felt that NCR person¬ 
nel may have misrepresented the NCR 8200, 8300, 
8400, 8500,8600, 9020, 9040. 9050, 9300 or similar 
product lines. We wish to combine our information 
in efforts to seek a solution to our clients problems 
All responses will be treated confidentially 
Contact Norman Cohen 
INTERACTIVE SYSTEMS CORPORATION 
1950 N Park Place. Atlanta. GA 30339 
(404) 955-5525 


IEEE builds new Ethernet standard 

Group envisions 10Mbit/sec. version of twisted-pair wiring protocol 


BY ELISABETH HORWITT 

CW STAFF 

PALO ALTO, Calif. — As rival 
vendors race to develop a 10M 
bit/sec. Ethernet that runs over 
twisted-pair wiring [CW, Aug. 


3], a study group formed by 
members of the Institute of Elec¬ 
trical and Electronics Engineers, 
Inc. (IEEE) 802.3 standards 
committee is taking the first step 
toward standardizing the proto¬ 
cols for such offerings. 


The group, which consists of 
more than a dozen vendors, was 
formed during the July meeting 
of the IEEE 802.3 standards 
committee. 

The new group’s purpose is 
to look into the possibility of a 


10M bit/sec. version of the IEEE 
802.3 twisted-pair Ethernet 
standard, sometimes called Star¬ 
lan. 

The group, which will have its 
first meeting next week, in¬ 
cludes representatives from 
Hewlett-Packard Co., AT&T, 
Retix Co., Texas Instruments, 
Inc., Unger mann-Bass, Inc., Un¬ 
isys Corp., Xerox Corp., Digital 
Equipment Corp., National 


44 


COMPUTERWORLD 


AUGUST 10,1987 














































NETWORKING 


Sears 

FROM PAGE 41 

ment software.” 

Outside observers say there 
is, indeed, a special relationship 
between IBM and Sears, which 
is virtually an all-IBM shop. 
“The Sears integration of NET 
and Netview was done under an 
agreement with IBM’s Federal 
Systems Division in Maryland,” 
notes Francis Dzubeck, presi¬ 
dent of Communications Net¬ 
work Architects, Inc. in Wash¬ 
ington, D.C. “It’s common 
knowledge in the industry that 
Sears has a commitment to IBM 
and that IBM has a commitment 
to them. IBM has also used Sears 
as a test site for various products 
in the past.” 

The network is Sears’ at¬ 
tempt to put in place a backbone 
network that could serve all the 
business groups within the cor¬ 
poration. The single, integrated 
SNA network supports the com¬ 
munications needs of Sears’ 
merchandising group, its All¬ 
state Insurance Co., Dean Wit¬ 
ter Reynolds, Inc. brokerage 
business and Coldwell Banker 
Real Estate Group, Inc. 

Together, the combined 
Sears businesses generate about 
$45 billion annually, of which 
$27 billion comes from Sears’ re¬ 
tail store operations. The same 
communications network also 
routes transactions from 15 mil¬ 
lion users of the Discover card, a 
subsidiary operation within 
Dean Witter, to two DP centers 
for processing. 

Competitive edge 

But while it serves a strategic 
purpose, Sears is willing to talk 
about this internal SNA net¬ 
work. That is unlike other IBM- 
only operations like United Air¬ 
lines, which has repeatedly 
rebuffed inquiries into the details 
of its Apollo Computer, Inc.-re- 
la ted network architecture. 

United, like Ford Motor Co., 
is using its technology to gain 
greater market share in a highly 
competitive market. Sears is 
also competing for market share, 
but the merchandising of its 
goods plays a strong role in its 
overall competitiveness, says 
Walter Loeb, a senior analyst 
with the New York investment 
firm of Morgan Stanley Group, 
Inc. 

“I think Sears has a sophisti¬ 
cation in technology that few 
people in their industry recog¬ 
nize,” Loeb says. “But it doesn’t 
necessarily reflect in their bot¬ 
tom line because the merchan¬ 
dising aspects are so important. ’ ’ 

Business practices and tech¬ 
nology are, however, inextrica¬ 
bly tied together. Sears’ new 
chairman, Michael Bozic, is try¬ 
ing to modernize Sears’ aging 
distribution system, which re¬ 
portedly costs Sears 8% of sales. 
Competitors K-Mart Corp. and 
Wal-Mart Stores, Inc. average 
only 3% of sales for distribution 


costs, and both of them have 
chosen a different communica¬ 
tions technology — very small- 
aperture terminal — for internal 
communications. 

SNA was chosen by Sears be¬ 
cause it was the common denom¬ 
inator for most of the company’s 
divisions in the late 1970s and 
early 1980s. SNA is credited 
with allowing Sears to create a 
wide-area network that pre¬ 
vents a high volume of local traf¬ 
fic from interfering with traffic 
routed to host computers. 

“We are very satisfied with 
SNA,” Weis adds. “It allows any 
terminal in the network to con¬ 
nect with any mainframe, re¬ 
gardless of location. To support 
an additional computer any¬ 
where in the country, all we do is 
change a software table at our 
network control center.” The 
network does not have to be 
turned off to add new compo¬ 
nents, he says. 

The SNA-only design also 
eliminates the need for statisti¬ 
cal multiplexing, Weis says. In¬ 
stead, a hierarchical top-down 
system was put into place with 
low-end IBM 3720s filtering lo¬ 
cal traffic up to front-end IBM 
3725s and IBM host computers. 

“All the polling is contained 
within a locality,” Weis says, “so 
that none of the interlocal access 
and transport area circuits are 
congested with that traffic. The 
IBM 3720s only send valid data 
upstream.” The only multiplex¬ 
ing of any consequence occurs in 
the 50 T1 intercity lines, which 
combine voice and data mes¬ 
sages. 


cluster-controllers from 5,384 
to 8,980 between 1985 and the 
end of this year. 

Netview is critical to the 
smooth operation of a vast na¬ 
tionwide network, Sears manag¬ 
ers say. “I don’t think you could 
build a network of this size with¬ 
out Netview,” says Weis, who 
oversees the integrated network 
that his organization designed 
four years ago. 

Before then, Sears’ divisions 
had been using more than 10 
separate SNA networks to sup¬ 
port their separate business 
functions. 

Creating a single voice/data 
network in 1984 gave Sears sev¬ 
eral leverage points, Weis says. 


creating a single list of all system 
alerts and providing real-time 
monitoring. 

“Systems management func¬ 
tions have now been folded into 
Netview, giving it the ability to 
handle automated responses to 
network alerts and providing 
centralized automated control,” 
Weis says. 

The NET multiplexers are 
also capable of automatically re¬ 
routing traffic around a damaged 
portion of the network. As yet, 
there are no IBM 9370s in the 
field, but Weis says Sears was 
evaluating two units. “We will 
use the 9370s as remote net¬ 
work servers,” Weis says, “and 
that will allow in-house printing 


Since the communications 
network is so large, it is consid¬ 
ered a resource to all divisions 
within Sears. An advisory board 
made up of DP managers and se¬ 
nior managers from each Sears 
business group meets regularly 
to discuss network planning and 
management with Weis and his 
Chicago staff. 

Sears recently decided that 
its network and networking ex¬ 
pertise is extensive enough to 
support a profitable business as a 
value-added reseller. 

The company created a whol¬ 
ly owned subsidiary, Sears Com¬ 
munications Co., to sell commu¬ 
nications services to end users 
who did not have private net¬ 


Sears communications network 

Network Equipment Technology switches coordinate voice, SNA connections among multiple U.S. sites 



‘Essential product’ 

IBM’s Information Management 
software package is another im¬ 
portant element of network 
management. 

“Information Management 
provides problem-and-change 
management,” Weis says. 


“When you try to keep track of 
as many things as we do, it’s an 
essential product to maintain op¬ 
erations.” The dozen or so staff¬ 
ers per shift at Sears’ network 
control center in Chicago use In¬ 
formation Management to help 
resolve network faults before 
they escalate into a crisis. 

In size, the Sears network is 
third only to IBM’s internal SNA 
networks, Weis says. Those two 
IBM networks are the IBM In¬ 
formation Network in Tampa, 
Fla., and another network that 
serves internal IBM operations. 
Sears’ network has grown by 
nearly 30% in each of the last 
two years, reflecting an increase 
in the number of connections to 


Among them were central con¬ 
trol of the network utility, the 
ability to buy network compo¬ 
nents in volume at discounted 
prices and improved vendor 
management with suppliers such 
as IBM, the regional Bell holding 
companies and U.S. Sprint Com¬ 


munications Co., the principal in¬ 
terstate carrier for the wide- 
area network. 

In addition, Sears is convert¬ 
ing most of its AT&T leased 
lines to others provided by the 
regional Bell operating compa¬ 
nies. Sears says the reason for 
doing this is that the holding 
companies are providing shorter 
delivery times for new installa¬ 
tions. Sears uses voice lines to 
send analog data from thousands 
of modems and has no plans to 
substitute digital signals from 
the scattered modems. 

IBM’s Netview is at the heart 
of this unified Sears system. Net- 
view supports central manage¬ 
ment of the far-flung network by 


to be done at distributed sites, 
close to the end users.” 

The engine driving the net¬ 
work is a single IBM 3090 Model 
200 with 256M bytes of expand¬ 
ed memory. Tucked away in a 
northwestern Chicago suburb, 
the 3090 mainframe has been 
dedicated to running the Sears 
network. Adjacent to the com¬ 
puter room that houses the net¬ 
work’s central mainframe is a 
Network Control Center that 
monitors all system alerts and is¬ 
sues all system commands to re¬ 
pair network faults. 

A mirror-image site in Dallas 
is also in place, prepared to take 
over command of the network in 
the event a tornado, power fail¬ 
ure or other catastrophe hits the 
Chicago center. The Dallas cen¬ 
ter is manned but has no tele¬ 
communications staff. An IBM 
3090 Model 200, just like the 
one in Chicago, sits idle, waiting 
to be placed on-line in an emer¬ 
gency. 

The Dallas mainframe is test¬ 
ed every week, and Chicago per¬ 
sonnel visit from time to time to 
practice network-control func¬ 
tions at the Dallas site. Although 
both the Chicago and Dallas net¬ 
work centers have diesel gener¬ 
ators, the ones in Dallas could 
run indefinitely if the Chicago 
center ever became severely 
damaged. 


works of their own. 

“We feel that we can leverage 
this new business off the experi¬ 
ence we’ve gained in designing, 
implementing and operating a 
very large SNA network,” says 
Weis, who also acts as president 
of the new venture. 

The company, which has few¬ 
er than 20 major accounts right 
now, is expected to be a profit 
area for Sears, says Larry Jellen, 
vice-president of marketing and 
sales for Sears Communications. 
“We’re selling an end-to-end 
service for companies with at 
least 20 to 30 remote locations,” 
Jellen says, “and we’re guaran¬ 
teeing the amount of network 
availability and response time by 
contract. Users don’t have to 
pay for downtime.” 

The Sears Communications 
end-user service does not reflect 
excess capacity within the Sears 
network, Weis says. And Sears 
will not run a user’s applications 
— users must supply their own 
host computers to do the pro¬ 
cessing. 

The selling point is Sears’ ex¬ 
perience with SNA and with IBM 
communications architecture, 
something Sears feels has been 
proven by IBM’s recent product 
announcements and statements 
of direction. They are, in fact, 
statements about Sears’ own di¬ 
rection in SNA design. 


S EARS’ NETWORK has grwn by nearly 
30% in each of the last two years, 
reflecting an increase in the number of 
connections to cluster controllers from 5,384 to 
8,980 between 1985 and the end of this year. 


AUGUST 10,1987 


COMPUTERWORLD 


45 




























































NETWORKING 


Banks 

FROM PAGE 41 

based on a survey of chief finan¬ 
cial officers, DP managers and 
EDI coordinators within For¬ 
tune 1,000 corporations as well 
as in-depth interviews with ex¬ 
ecutives at corporations using 
EDI. Electronic Cash Manage¬ 
ment, Inc., a Marietta, Ga., con¬ 
sulting firm, and the Bank Ad¬ 
ministration Institute, a 
research institute in Rolling 
Meadows, Ill., are assisting with 
the research. 

Study sponsors include Bank 
of Boston Corp., Bankers Trust 
Co., The Chase Manhattan Bank 
NA, Chemical Bank, Continental 


B anks have 

discussed... 
the possibility 
that a bank might serve 
as a local value-added 
network.” 


JACKSHAW 
ELECTRONIC CASH 
MANAGEMENT, INC. 


Illinois National Bank & Trust 
Co. of Chicago, First Interstate 
Bank, Ltd., First National Bank 
of Maryland, Irving Trust Co., 
Manufacturers Hanover Trust 
Co., PNC Financial Corp., Secu¬ 
rity Pacific Corp. and Shawmut 
Corp. 

Cashing in 

The banks are eager to capitalize 
on their previous investments in 
communications links with major 
corporate customers for elec¬ 
tronic payment and cash man¬ 
agement services, Manion said. 
“Banks have established ‘elec¬ 
tronic shelf space’ in so many 
companies already, it makes 
sense for them to offer products 
that allow companies to commu¬ 
nicate with other companies us¬ 
ing bank networks,” he added. 

Manion said the banks could 
either handle all of the financial 
and network services them¬ 
selves — and in doing so, com¬ 
pete against existing EDI net¬ 
work vendors such as GE 
Information Services in Rock¬ 
ville, Md., and McDonnell Doug¬ 
las Electronic Data Interchange 
Systems Co. in St. Louis — or 
form alliances with those value- 





DBMS 

FOR THE 

IBM SERIES/1 
800 - 626-5518 
502 - 633-5700 

EDI & APPLICATIONS TOO! 


added network vendors. 

Thomas Tucker, the Bank 
Administration Institute’s direc¬ 
tor of operations and technol¬ 
ogy, said the first EDI service 
that banks are likely to offer is 
the transmission of detailed re¬ 
mittance data to go along with 
intercorporate payments. 

An EDI pilot project involving 
General Motors Corp. and eight 
banks is already proving the fea¬ 


sibility of having the auto maker 
send payments and remittance 
data to its suppliers, with the 
banks as intermediaries, Tucker 
said. 

However, the banks are not 
fearlessly rushing into the EDI 
industry, according to Victor 
Wheatman, an analyst with In¬ 
put, a research firm in Mountain 
View, Calif. 

Some banks are reluctant to 


go beyond the familiar service of 
handling electronic payments, 
either because EDI is not part of 
their strategic business plan, or 
because they fear security prob¬ 
lems or new liabilities if incor¬ 
rect data is sent with a payment, 
he said. 

In the short term, banks will 
want to make their existing elec¬ 
tronic payment and cash man¬ 
agement services compatible 


with the EDI standard X.12 and 
then move on to intercorporate 
transactions, according to Jack 
Shaw, president of Electronic 
Cash Management. 

“One idea that a number of 
banks have discussed is the pos¬ 
sibility that a bank might serve 
as a local value-added network or 
perhaps as a port to the big, na¬ 
tional value-added networks,” 
Shaw said. 



46 


COMPUTERWORLD 


AUGUST 10,1987 






















NETWORKING 


Local-area 
network hardware 

A multirate data service unit/ 
channel service unit (DSU/CSU) 
for digital data service networks 
has been announced by Univer¬ 
sal Data Systems. 


The Model DDS/MR is said 
to operate at 56K, 9.6K, 4.8K or 
2.4K bit/sec. over the network 
in point-to-point and multipoint 
applications. It combines the 
functions of a DSU and a CSU 
into a single unit directly com¬ 
patible with Bell 500 Series 
equipment. 


The unit costs $695. 
Universal Data Systems, 
5000 Bradford Drive, Hunts¬ 
ville, Ala. 35805. 


Customer-premise 

equipment 

A Multiplexer Interface Pan¬ 
el and a Data Distributor de¬ 
signed for use with Micom Sys¬ 
tems, Inc.’s Instanet6000 


Series 40 Data private automatic 
branch exchange has been an¬ 
nounced by Micom. 

The Multiplexer Interface 
Panel is an interface backplane 
that provides five scan shelves of 
128 channels each. 

The Data Distributor Model 
M6432I is a single plug-in mod¬ 
ule that provides 32 channels 
multiplexed over twisted-pair 
wires to a connector panel. 


NEW 


PRODUCTS 



The Multiplexer Interface 
Panel costs $3,500. The Data 
Distributor costs $2,250 for the 
data-only version and $3,250 for 
the modem-control version. 

Micom Systems, 4100 Los 
Angeles Ave., Simi Valley, Calif. 
93063. 


Links 

A communications program said 
to allow a microcomputer to em¬ 
ulate the AT&T 5425/4425 
buffered display terminal has 
been introduced by Telex- 
press, Inc. 

The software, called 
EM4425, provides support for 
the AT&T 5425/4425 modes of 
operation, such as set-up 
screens compatible with the ter¬ 
minal; scroll mode that supports 
a memory-access screen of 78 
rows by 80-col. support for up to 
four simultaneous windows; and 
support for 26- and 27-line key¬ 
board labels. 

EM4425 costs $150 per li¬ 
cense. 

Telexpress, P.O. Box 217, 
Willingboro, N.J. 08046. 


F There's a vast world of difference 
between the power of a super 
minicomputer and the power of 
the new Gould NPL™ family of 
mini supercomputers. It's a whole 
new category of compatible 
Gould computers that bridges the 
gap between giant supercompu¬ 
ters on the one hand and super¬ 
minis on the other. The Gould NPL 
family offers you the power and 
advantages of supercomputers 
at the cost of superminis. 

Introducing the NPL 
Firebreathers. 

Supercomputers are character¬ 
ized primarily by their parallel 
architecture and high speed 
vector processing capabilities. 

The new Gould mini supercom¬ 
puters provide both. But they 
eliminate the supercomputer 
disadvantages of high initial and 
ongoing costs, expensive environ¬ 
mental controls, specially trained 
programmers, nonstandard 
operating systems, nontransport¬ 
able software development tools 
and applications. All these factors 
have limited the use of supercom¬ 
puters to a few large corporations, 
government agencies and 
research laboratories. 


The first member of the Gould 
NPL family of Firebreathers, NP1, 
delivers performance equal to 
first generation supercomputers — 
at the cost savings of a supermini. 

Harness the power. 

No longer are you limited by com¬ 
puter technologies that haven't 
kept pace with your imagination. 

The multiprocessor parallel archi¬ 
tecture of the Gould NP1 gives 
you the availability of both high 
performance scalar and vector 
processing, simultaneously. Real 
memory is expandable to a 
mammoth 4 billion bytes. 

Moreover, unlike supercomputers 
(and most minisupers), Gould NP1 
is designed to support the concept 
of open system architectures — 
especially with regard to lan¬ 
guages, operating systems, I/O 
interfaces and communications. 

The dual processor NP1 system 
buses can be expanded to 
include up to eight CPU's, con¬ 
figured over four buses intercon¬ 
nected by high speed intersystem 
bus links. The system bus design 
delivers continuous throughput 
at a rate five times faster than 
any supermini on the market. 


The NP1 computer system is 
controlled by our UNIX®-based 
operating system, UTX/32® Third 
party UNIX applications software 
can be transported to NPL with 
no major conversion required. 
Both System V and BSD 4.3 envi¬ 
ronments can be selected. The 
repertoire of industry standard 
languages includes vectorizing 
FORTRAN, highly optimized C 
compilers, and Ada® in addition 
to BASIC, Pascal, COBOL and LISP. 

Imagine the applications. 

How you use Gould's NPL family is 
limited only by your imagination. 

Consider the power of NPL applied 
to complex scientific and engin¬ 
eering computations, simulation, 
real time data acquisition and 
intensive program development. 

If your present computer no 
longer has the power you really 
need, get in touch with the future. 
Get in touch with Gould. 


Gould, Inc., Information Systems 
Computer Systems Division 
6901 West Sunrise Boulevard 
Fort Lauderdale, Florida 33313 
1 -800-GOULD-10, TLX 441491 


UNIX is a registered trademark of AT&T Bell Labs 
Ada is a registered trademark ol the U S 
Government. Ada Joint Program Otlice. 

NPL & UTX / 32 are trademarks ot Gould, Inc. 


■> GOULD 

Electronics 


File servers 

Solana Electronics has intro¬ 
duced a communications server 
said to enable remote Apple 
Computer, Inc. Macintosh users 
to access that company’s Apple- 
talk network and its resources 
directly from dial-up telephone 
lines. 

R-Server with a modem con¬ 
nects as the data path into a local 
Appletalk network to manage 
data traffic between the remote 
Macintosh with a modem and 
any resource on the network. 

R-Server costs $495. 

Solana Electronics, Suite A, 
7887 Dunbrook Road, San Die¬ 
go, Calif. 92126. 

Cabling 

A four-pair shielded plenum 
transceiver cable that meets 
IEEE 802.3 requirements for 
compatible local-area networks 
has been introduced by Belden 
Wire and Cable. 

The Belden 89901 pair 
shields are electrically isolated 
from the outer shielding with an 
overall polyester isolation tape 
and Duofoil shield. 

The Belden 89901 costs 
$1,782 per 1,000 ft. 

Belden. P.O. Box 1980, Rich¬ 
mond, Ind. 47375. 



ANAGEMENT 

EPORTING/RETRIEVAL 

Capability 

Tor THE IBM S/38 


For more information 
Contact Charles White at: 
michaels, ross& cole. ltd. 
800 West Roosevelt Road 
Building E, Suite 304 
Glen Ellyn, IL60137 
(312) 790-5040 


AUGUST 10,1987 


COMPUTERWORLD 


47 







































And deadlines. 

And decisions. 

For years, mid-sized manufacturers have needed a 
practical, comprehensive management system. One that 
would give them a few of the advantages their larger com¬ 
petitors take for granted. 

Honeywell Bull has one. We call it the HMS/7 manufac¬ 


turing management system. You’ll call it the edge. 

Because whether you have a computer department or 
not, HMS/7 will let you automate with a single database. 
From shop floor functions all the way to top management. 
Getting you to market fast while ensuring quality every step 
of the way. 

HMS/7 includes workhorse DPS 7000 hardware and 


Customers are more 








software. As well as field-proven MRP II applications soft- For more information call 1 -800-328-5111, ext. 9705, 

ware to give you minute-by-minute control of your manufac- or write: Honeywell Bull Inc., Plant Manufacturing Systems, 
turing operations. MS440,200 Smith Street, Waltham, MA 02154. 

Honeywell Bull has been helping the world’s largest 
manufacturers for a long time. With HMS/7, we’re bringing 
everything we’ve learned to mid-sized companies. Com¬ 
plete with education, training, service, and support. 

6* . . .. ... . : ? 8 • .V.’n ■ ' : 8 . 

ortant than computers. 
























How to survive 
your S/3X 

without Decision Data. 


Alright. You 
I! might be 
able to survive 
without us. But 
why make things 
tougher than they need 
to be? 

With over 17,000 
satisfied customers in 
many different indus¬ 
tries, were the largest, inde¬ 
pendent, worldwide supplier of 
compatible peripherals for the 
System/36, /38 and /34. But our 
experience with-and commitment 
to-the S/3X marketplace extends 
well beyond individual products 
to total systems solutions and 
support. 

When you work with us, you 
work with a Decision Data repre¬ 
sentative who knows our products 
inside out; who takes a personal 
interest in your business and your 
needs; and who 
specializes in giving 


<g) Bettor 


you more for less. 
You get direct 
support from our 
own Decision Data 
Service, Inc. with 
120 locations and over 
500 field engineers 
3 £ ready to help when 
you need them. 

5o nobody knows who YOU get ^ 

purchased the problem. pfoduCtS backed 

by an annual R&D investment of 
nearly $9,000,000 to ensure com¬ 
plete compatibility and outstand¬ 
ing price/performance features; 
products that are proven reliable 
by countless, rigorous testing 
procedures. 

And you get the kind of 
product selection that 
results in the most 
successful solu- 
tions.Our product 
family includes 
everything 


You should 
have worried. 




from matrix, 
band and laser 
printers to 
multi-user 
systems, 
ergonomic- 

ally 

terminals and 
personal workstation 
systems for decision support 
applications. Even memory 
enhancements and uninterruptible 
power supplies. 

All of which means when 
your solution includes Decision 
Data, you can feel very comfortable 
knowing you’ll never have to 
mask your decision. Ever. 

For more information, 
simply call 
1-800-523-6529, 
or in PA, 

(215) 757-3322. 

In Canada, call 
16) 273-7161. 



Decision 

Data 

Computer 

Corporation 


A Decision Industries Company 


COMPATIBLES ENGINEERED TO SURVIVE THE FUTURE. 


© 1987, Decision Data Computer Corporation. 400 Horsham Rd,, Horsham, PA 19044-0996 










SYSTEMS & PERIPHERALS 


DEC preps faster Microvax 

Q-bus-based mini seen out-gunning low end; September intro eyed 


HARD 


TALK 



James Connolly 


Supermini 
battle rages 

Most discussions of what peo¬ 
ple call “the mid-range” focus on 
the computer market served by 
systems such as the IBM Sys¬ 
tem/36 and 9370 and Digital 
Equipment Corp.’s VAX 8250. 
That is a performance range in 
which IBM and its minicomputer 
rivals are knocking heads. 

But there is another, some¬ 
times forgotten, group of mid¬ 
range systems that have been 
the subjects of heated marketing 
battles lately. Those are the 
systems in the high-end super¬ 
minicomputer and small main¬ 
frame class, such as IBM’s 4381 
and 3090 Model 120E, DEC’s 
VAX 8700, Prime Computer, 
Inc.’s 6350 and Hewlett-Pack¬ 
ard Co.’s HP 3000 Series 930. 

As with the smaller systems, 
the activity in the upper mid¬ 
range has generally involved 
product introductions, enhance¬ 
ments and repricing. 

In May, IBM introduced 
four models of the 4381, featur¬ 
ing twice the memory and 30% 
performance gains in compari¬ 
son with older 4381s. The si¬ 
multaneous introduction of the 
4381s and the 3090 Model 
120E represented not only 
moves against IBM’s competi¬ 
tors, but, in effect, competition 
among IBM’s own products as 
the performance of the 4381 and 
3090 overlapped for the first 
time. 

Continued on page 52 


BY DAVID BRIGHT 

CW STAFF 


Digital Equipment Corp. is ready 
to introduce a Microvax that out¬ 
performs some larger and more 
expensive VAX 8000 series sys¬ 
tems and is based on DEC’s Q- 
bus rather than the faster 
VAXBI bus. 

The Microvax III is expected 
to debut at the Decworld exposi¬ 
tion to be held in Boston from 
Sept. 8-18. 

According to a beta-test user 
and a third-party developer, the 
new Microvax will perform more 


SAN JOSE, Calif. — Locom 
Corp. recently introduced mem¬ 
ory cards designed for use in the 
third-generation 4381 models 
that IBM announced in May. 

The 2M- and 4M-byte LCM- 
400 cards use lM-bit memory 
technology and were designed to 
function in the IBM 4381 Mod¬ 
els 21 and 24, which are due for 
shipment in early 1988, or in the 
seven older 4381 models. 

Locom officials said the mem- 


Data View 

VAX/Microvax markets 

Percent of dedicated sites using 
Digital Equipment Corp. systems 
in U.S. 



INFORMATION PROVIDED BY 
COMPUTER INTELLIGENCE 
CW CHART 


than 2 million instructions per 
second (MIPS) and will surpass 
the performance levels of ma¬ 
chines like the VAX 8250. 

However, because the two 
lines use different buses, Micro¬ 
vax users will still be unable to 
upgrade to the VAX 8000 series. 

In addition to the Microvax 
III, observers said they expect 
DEC to introduce a more power¬ 
ful Vaxstation, an improved 
gateway to IBM’s Systems Net¬ 
work Architecture (SNA) and 
possibly a 3-MIPS VAX 8400 to 
fill a performance gap in the VAX 
8000 line. 


ory cards, which are available 
now, are needed because the 
new 4381s do not support the 
company’s existing 16M-byte 
modules. 

The company also claimed 
that the cards are, electronically, 
pin-for-pin identical to IBM 
cards but are faster and dissipate 
25% less heat than the IBM 
products. 

Speed edge claimed 

A company spokesman said the 
Locom card is typically more 
than twice as fast as an IBM card 
during a write cycle. He said the 
LCM-400 cards are mechanical¬ 
ly identical in dimension to the 
IBM cards and that they use 
edge-card connectors that are 
compatible with IBM card-cage 
connectors. 

When a 4M-byte card is in¬ 
stalled in an older 4381 model, 
the card functions as two 2M- 
byte cards. 

Locom said 8M bytes of mem¬ 
ory cost $20,000, 16M bytes 
cost $30,000, 24M bytes cost 
$45,000 and 32M bytes cost 
$55,000. 


The Microvax III is intended 
to leapfrog the performance of 
competing departmental sys¬ 
tems, such as Prime Computer, 
Inc.’s recently announced 1.6- 
MIPS 2455. The Vaxstation, 
which is based on the Microvax 
series, will compete in the hotly 
contested technical-workstation 
market against machines from 
Sun Microsystems, Inc. and 
Apollo Computer, Inc. 

Priced in the same range as 
the Microvax II, the Microvax 
III uses a CMOS microprocessor 
to more than double perfor- 
Continued on page 52' 

NCR services 
System/3 6s 

Says banks, retailers 
to form bulk of market 


BY STANLEY GIBSON 

CW STAFF 


DAYTON, Ohio — NCR Corp.’s 
Third-Party Services recently 
announced that it will provide 
maintenance for two models in 
IBM’s System/36 line. 

NCR said it will service the 
Model 5360 and Model 5362 as 
well as peripherals throughout 
the U.S. 

“Banks, in particular, often 
have NCR sorters with Sys¬ 
tem/36 processors. It’s a natural 
fit that way,” said Jeff Sugheir, 
NCR’s Third-Party Services 
manager of marketing services. 

Other users likely to have 
both NCR and IBM equipment 
are retail stores that have NCR 
point-of-sale equipment and a 
System/36. However, NCR does 
not require an IBM user to have 
NCR gear in order to obtain 
Continued on page 56 


McDonnell 
Douglas 
adds minis 

IRVINE, Calif. — McDonnell 
Douglas Computer Systems Co. 
recently expanded its line of re¬ 
lational data base minicomputers 
with six systems featuring great¬ 
er main memory and disk stor¬ 
age capacities than those of earli¬ 
er models. 

Like the older models, the 
new systems run McDonnell 
Douglas’s Reality relational data 
base management operating sys¬ 
tem, which is based on Pick Sys¬ 
tems’ Pick operating system. 

The company replaced its 
four 3-year-old Series 9200 sys¬ 
tems with five models that it said 
feature up to four times the disk 
capacity as well as more memory 
capacity and user ports at the 
low end. 

The new low-end 9225 sup¬ 
ports 2M to 4M bytes of memo¬ 
ry, up to 780M bytes of disk 
storage and up to 96 users, com¬ 
pared with 1M to 2M bytes of 
memory, 520M bytes of disk 
storage and a maximum of 64 us¬ 
ers on the older 9220. 

At the high end now is the 
9265, with a disk capacity of 
4.16G bytes. Like the earlier 
9250, which had a disk capacity 
of 1.04G bytes, the 9265 sup¬ 
ports up to 8M bytes of memory 
and 208 users. 

The company also added 
high-end models to the 2-year- 
Continued on page 56 

Inside 

• Kodak Datashow system 
casts new light on computer- 
image overhead projection. 
Page 57. 

• Honeywell Bull Italia an¬ 
nounces color dot matrix 
printer. Page 57. 


Cards jog 4381 memory 


Utility’s MIS weathers climate shift 


BY JAMES CONNOLLY 

CW STAFF 


PROFILE 


SAN FRANCISCO — For two 
decades, Pacific Gas & Electric 
Co. (PG&E) has been a company 
to watch in terms of computer 
use. 

PG&E was on the leading 
edge in the 1960s, when it estab¬ 
lished an information systems 
project and began bringing its 
commercial data processing and 


technical computing resources 
under a common management. 
The utility, which serves North¬ 
ern California’s energy needs, 
became an early user of IBM 
plug-compatible mainframes 
made by Amdahl Corp. and Na¬ 
tional Advanced Systems Corp. 
(NAS) in the 1970s. During the 
1980s, PG&E has standardized 
on the IBM Personal Computer 
and was among the first firms to 
negotiate site licenses for PC 
software. 

Now, with IBM and IBM- 



A. W. Simila 


compatible standards at the 
mainframe and workstation lev¬ 


el, PG&E officials are looking at 
their options for the middle level 
in a three-tiered computer hier¬ 
archy, as the MIS group and the 
corporation adapt to major 
changes in the utility industry. It 
is a search that may prove futile, 
at least in the near term, accord¬ 
ing to A. W. Simila, manager of 
PG&E’s information systems 
department. 

“Currently, the technology is 
very strong at the mainframe 
level and at the desk top. We’re 
just beginning to get that middle 
tier defined,” Simila says, adding 
that it is difficult to specify 
PG&E’s middle-tier needs. “We 


don’t have that fully rationalized 
because we are still waiting for 
the industry to settle down.” 

PG&E is evaluating the offer¬ 
ings of various hardware ven¬ 
dors, including the IBM 9370 
and Digital Equipment Corp. 
VAX minicomputers, and has 
used local-area networks in the 
middle tier for specific applica¬ 
tions. “But the major thrust is 
still at linking workstations di¬ 
rectly to the mainframe,” re¬ 
ports Simila, an industrial engi¬ 
neer who has been involved with 
computers in utilities for 20 
years. 

Conti n ued on page 56 


AUGUST 10,1987 


COMPUTERWORLD 


51 


































SYSTEMS & PERIPHERALS 


Supermini 

CONTINUED FROM PAGE 51 

In April, Prime positioned its 9350 
and 9550 against the lower part of the 
3090 line. Meanwhile, DEC has contin¬ 
ued its well-documented drive of its VAX 
line from the middle of the IBM 4300 
performance range into the 3090 scale, 
HP is preparing to ship its first produc¬ 
tion versions of the HP 3000 Model 930 
reduced instruction set computer and 
National Advanced Systems Corp. has 
brought its AS/VL systems to the U.S. 
market. 

It is obvious that these vendors and 
others are accelerating their efforts in the 
mid-range. As usual, users benefit from 


such competition if only because of the 
price pressure created, particularly 
when a user leverages the threat of 
changing vendors. 

Dealers pushing harder 

But there also is an accelerated competi¬ 
tion on the part of another group — the 
lessor and used computer community. 
Those dealers appear to be pushing hard¬ 
er now than they have for about a year 
when it comes to promoting used IBM 
3080s and 4300s over new 4300s and 
3090s. 

The most recent example was that of 
Computer Merchants, Inc. promoting 
used IBM 3083s and 4381s as alterna¬ 
tives to the newer 4381 Models 21 to 24 
and the 3090 Model 120E. 


Computer Merchants bluntly calls 
the 3090 Model 120E a “typical entry- 
level trap” designed to draw customers 
into the 3090 family. Jumping for the low- 
end 3090, with a bare-bones price of less 
than $1 million, may make sense for the 
user who sees the potential for a rela¬ 
tively short-term need for features such 
as expanded storage — available only on 
a 3090 — or 4.5M bit/sec. channels, 
available on the 3090 when IBM gets 
around to announcing it. 

Some don’t need leading edge 

But dealers like Computer Merchants 
and its competitors, including Comdisco, 
Inc., have a valid point if they argue that 
many people may not want those leading- 
edge functions. 


Computer Merchants makes a case 
that is hard to dispute. The dealer says a 
user who needs a mainframe in the range 
of 7 to 8 million instructions per second 
(MIPS) can get a used IBM 3083 Model J 
for $425,000, compared with the 
$900,000 or more for a 7.5 MIPS 3090 
Model 120E or 8.1 MIPS 4381 Model 24. 
The dealer makes similar arguments for 
used 4381s over the new 4381 models. 

Such used machines may not be for 
everyone. However, their presence in the 
market serves a purpose. Like the threat 
of jumping to other vendors, the option of 
buying a used computer does its part in 
keeping new system prices in check. 


Connolly is Computerivorld’s senior editor, sys¬ 
tems & peripherals. 



Everyone’s talking the 9370 


Faster Microvax 

CONTINUED FROM PAGE 51 

mance to at least 2 MIPS. That compares 
favorably with the VAX 8250’s estimated 
capability of about 1.3 MIPS, but the Mi¬ 
crovax III retains the Q-bus used in the 
Microvax II. The VAX 8250 uses DEC’s 
VAXBI bus. The CMOS microprocessor 
includes a subset of the VAX’s CPU in¬ 
struction set. 

A third-party hardware developer who 
said he has seen the new system said the 
chip can ultimately operate at 3 MIPS, 
but that DEC cannot yet produce the fast¬ 
er versions in quantity. 

According to the source, the only in¬ 
compatibilities between the Microvax II 
and the Microvax III are that a new mem¬ 
ory interconnect scheme is used. “If you 
had a Microvax II on your floor right now, 
and you wanted to make it a Microvax III, 
you’d not only need a new CPU, but also 
new memory boards,” he said. “I believe 
the memory boards that will run on a Mi¬ 
crovax III are identical to those memory 
boards that are now being used in the Mi- 
croPDP-11/83.” He said he was told that 
DEC will offer upgrade kits for moving up 
to a Microvax III. 


IBM's venture into mid-range computing is 
big news, so it's important to get all the 
facts. That's why DELTAK Training Corp. 
went straight to the source. The 9370: IBM's 
Solution for Mid-Range Computing is an 
exclusive interview conducted by computer 
technology expert James Martin with Don 
Friedman, IBM's key player in developing its 
9370 strategy. 

The 9370: IBM's Solution for Mid-Range 
Computing is required viewing for everyone 
who's involved in installing the 9370, and for 
all those just thinking about it. 

■ For senior management, an overview of 
the 9370's strategic implications: how it fits 
into today's corporate computing...and 
tomorrow's. 

■ For data base administrators, systems 
analysts and applications programmers, 
detailed descriptions of the 9370's many 
applications. 


■ For IS professionals, specific illustration 
of how to incorporate the 9370 into 
their shops. 

■ For capacity planners and systems 
programmers, detailed information about 
the support requirements at the 
department level. 

■ For all involved, information on the total 
integrated support requirements for 
the 9370. 

Contact your local DELTAK representative, 

or call 312-369-3000, extension 2516, today. 

Get the whole story, and get it straight, from 

DELTAK Training Corp. 

ftJ DELTAK 

TRAINING CORP 

A Subsidiary of National Education Corporation 

East-West Technological Center 

1751 West Diehl Road 

Naperville, IL 60540-9075 

312-369-3000 


©Copyright 1987. 

"Reprinted with special permission of 
King Features Syndicate, Incorporated." 


Early user makes plans 

One Microvax III beta-test user said he is 
pleased with the system and claimed it 
runs faster than 2 MIPS. Since the VAX 
8000 systems offer higher I/O speeds 
than the Microvax III, he said he does not 
expect the new systems to replace VAX 
8000 machines. Instead, he said his orga¬ 
nization plans to cluster the higher-end 
machines as file servers. 

John McCarthy, research manager at 
Forrester Research, Inc., said the Micro¬ 
vax III will run at 2.5 MIPS. He said the 
VAX 8400, which is generally believed to 
use a Microvax Ill-related chip set on the 
VAXBI bus, is also definite. 

Microvax II prices, including a DEC 
VMS license, currently start at $18,400, 
while the base price of a VAX 8250 with a 
VMS license is $92,000. 

Analyst Myron Kerstetter of the 
Gartner Group, Inc. in Stamford, Conn., 
said he expects the new system to carry 
the same price as the Microvax II. In addi¬ 
tion, Kerstetter said DEC should use Dec- 
world to introduce an aggressively priced 
Vaxstation based on the new chip. 

He added that DEC will introduce a 
more powerful gateway linking DEC sys¬ 
tems to SNA, but the software may not be 
available until much later. The gateway’s 
PDP-11 will be replaced by a VAX, he 
said. 


52 


COMPUTERWORLD 


AUGUST 10,1987 













































And what 
users demand 
are advancements 
that enhance their 
productivity within 
the industry standard. 

Advancements that extract more 
performance from over 10,000 differ¬ 
ent business software programs—the 
largest library of productivity software 
in the world. 

Still the performance leader 

COMPAQ personal computers prove 
superior in overall performance. 

Take speed. The COMPAQ 
DESKPRO 286* runs your software up 
to 20% faster than its PS/2™ counter¬ 
part. It also has high-performance fixed 
disk drives that are up to 2Vz times fast¬ 
er than theirs, with access times aver¬ 
aging less than 30 milliseconds. What's 
more, the COMPAQ DESKPRO 386™ 
sets all the records for speed in 
advanced-technology, industry- 
standard personal computers. 


The 12-MHz COMPAQ PORTABLE III 
is the smallest, most powerful full-function portable there is. 


Examine compatibility. We let you 
use all the industry-standard software 
and expansion boards that 
you already own. 

Look at expandability. 

Because our slots follow 
the industry standard, 
you have almost unlim¬ 
ited options to add the 
functions you need. Ex¬ 
tra memory, networking, 
communications, and 
many others. So you can 
configure your system 
exactly the way you 
want it. 

Finally, compare portabil- 


Model 50 


COMPAQ fixed disk drives can access 
data up to 2 V 2 times faster 

. ,, , .. , ,, T than PS/2 drives. 

ity. You can t. The 12-MHz 80286- 


based COMPAQ PORTABLE III™ is 
the undisputed leader. It offers all the 
functions and performance you'd ex¬ 


pect to find in the most 
advanced desktops. Without 
any of the compromises you'll find 
in other portables. 

Enhancing, 
not inhibiting 


Each component in every 
computer we build is de¬ 
signed to be the best, both 
individually and as part of 
the overall system. This 
way enhancements work 
together to give you unpar¬ 
alleled performance. Faster 
RAM. Internal backup sys¬ 


tems. Expanded memory and disk 
caching systems. Faster processors 
and coprocessors. Faster fixed disk 


fmr i i i j i fc tet rfsct ? i i 


_ 


Consider flexibility. Compaq 
offers 5 1 U" diskette drives, 
and allows you to add 3 V 2 " 
drives if you want them. In 
fact, you can add up to four 
different storage devices on all 
COMPAQ desktop computers. 


Demand for the 12-MHz COMPAQ DESKPRO 286 
has nearly doubled since the PS/2 introduction. 


I n the midst of the clamor sur¬ 
rounding the new IBM® PS/2 
series of personal computers, 
one thing is perfectly clear to 
people who really know PC’s. 
COMPAQ* personal computers still 
work better. They're faster, more 
compatible, more expandable, 
and more flexible to 
accommodate the 
advancements 
so many 
users 

demand. ss; 


It still simply works better. 

IBM, OS/2 and PS/2 are trademarks of International Business Machines Corporation Lotus, 1-2-3, and Symphony are trademarks of Lotus Development Corporation. 

Microsoft is a trademark of Microsoft Corporation. Paradox is a trademark of Ansa Software. dBASE HI PLUS is a trademark of Ashton Tate. MS OS/2 is a product of Microsoft Corporation. 


©1987 Compaq Computer Corporation. All rights reserved. 
































works better 



The COMPAQ 
DESKPRO 386 
sets the standard 
for high-performance, 
advanced-technology 
desktop computing. 


Two-way compatibility 


40 million software packages, 32 mil¬ 
lion peripheral products, and hun¬ 
dreds of millions of 
hours in training. 
Compaq designs 
its computers to 
protect your in¬ 
vestment. And 
because they do 
more, they also 
maximize it. 


drives that store more. These are all 
innovations built into both desktop 
and full-function portable PC's. 

Innovations made without sacrific¬ 
ing industry-standard compatibility. 

Earn higher returns 
on your investment 

The industry standard has a lot going 
for it. Namely, you and over 10 million 
other PC users it represents. Ameri¬ 
can business has $80 billion invested 
in the current PC standard, including 


Compaq has become famous for 
its legendary compatibility and con¬ 
nectivity. Our PC's will run thousands 



COMPAQ personal computers. 

than other computers. All the popular 
programs, including Lotus” 1-2-3) 
dBASE III PLUS? Microsoft" Word, 


Symphony: and Paradox? to name just 
a few. Without modification. 

Furthermore, you can insert the 
5 V4" diskettes your COMPAQ comput¬ 
ers use into all the other compatible 
computers in your office, without 
time-consuming diskette conversions. 

But our definition of compatibility 
looks to the future as well. For exam¬ 
ple, all 80286- and 80386-powered 
COMPAQ personal computers will 
run the new MS OS/2 operating sys¬ 
tem, allowing you to break the 640- 
Kbyte memory barrier and directly 
access up to 16 megabytes 



COMPAQ computers will also allow 
you to run all the applications devel¬ 
oped for OS/2™ Again, much faster. 

We don't burn bridges, 
we build them 

At Compaq, advances are measured 
by our ability to push technology for¬ 
ward, without leaving you behind. 
Building onto an existing body of 
work is more valuable than starting 
from scratch. That thinking led 
Compaq to the Fortune 500 faster 
than any other company in history. 

The PC industry standard has the 
flexibility to incorporate developing 
technology. More important, however, 
Compaq lets you take advantage of the 
latest technology in a way that's fully 
compatible with the hardware, software 
and add-ons you already own. So Compaq 
protects your investment, building 
bridges from today to tomorrow. 

These are all reasons why recent sur¬ 
veys show COMPAQ owners are the 
most satisfied personal computer users. 

All the more reason to call 1-800- 
231-0900, operator 39 for information 
and the location of your nearest Au¬ 
thorized COMPAQ Computer Dealer. 

In Canada, call 416-449-8741. 

comPAa: 

















SYSTEMS & PERIPHERALS 


Utility’s MIS 

CONTINUED FROM PAGE 51 

Reflecting on the technological and 
business changes of those two decades, 
Simila says a move into a commodity era 
in terms of departmental computing and 
simpler operating systems would make 
his job easier. “The hardware is giving us 
as much as we can use. There is still that 
balance between hardware and software, 
and it always seems that software is 
tougher to solve,” he says. But rather 
than becoming easier to use, system soft¬ 
ware and data management software is 
becoming more complex and technically 
oriented, he notes. 

The lack of middle-tier products has 


slowed PG&E’s progress toward a goal of 
networking all knowledge workers’ work¬ 
stations and means the project will take 
“a little longer” than the target time of 
five years from now, Simila says. 

PG&E projects continued 25% to 30% 
annual growth in computing power at 
both the mainframe and the microcom¬ 
puter level. Those microcomputers, 
which now number about 8,300 in the 
28,000-employee company, are used in 
both stand-alone and terminal-emulation 
modes. Simila says he sees the PC’s role 
as one where it complements the main¬ 
frame rather than replaces it. 

To support the growth of the PC popu¬ 
lation, PG&E became one of the first cor¬ 
porations to receive site licenses four 
years ago, when it acquired such a license 


for Lifetree Software, Inc.’s Volkswriter. 
Simila says the growth is a result of funda¬ 
mental changes in the way energy utilities 
do business in an era of deregulation. 

“Banking had to face the market earli¬ 
er ... In our industry, MIS is just now 
emerging more and more from being a 
backroom support-type function. We are 
focusing more and more on the outside,” 
Simila says. The company’s MIS group is 
working on strategies to link technologi¬ 
cal developments to the changes in the 
business environment. 

Customers hungry for more 

With deregulation, PG&E’s customers 
are looking for more individualized and 
varied services. Those changes mean new 
approaches to sales support and billing as 


well as accounting. 

“Billing becomes more and more com¬ 
plicated all of the time,” Simila says, not¬ 
ing that customers want more details in 
their bills and that public utility commis¬ 
sions require power companies to provide 
more detail in justifying rate requests. 

In conjunction with providing more in¬ 
formation to customers and holding onto 
PG&E’s position as the “preferred suppli¬ 
er of energy services,” PG&E has used 
computer technology to get greater pro¬ 
duction out of more than 3,500 customer 
service representatives, Simila says. 

PG&E also has more than 730 MIS 
employees supporting data centers in San 
Francisco and Fairfield, Calif., and at the 
Diablo Canyon nuclear power facility in 
San Luis Obispo, Calif. 

The data centers house a variety of 
mainframes, including two IBM 3090s, an 
Amdahl 5890, several Amdahl 5860s, 
multiple NAS AS/9080s and AS/9060s 
and several IBM 4300 series processors. 
In addition, PG&E uses large disk drives 
from IBM and three plug-compatible 
manufacturers. 

PG&E was one of the early users of 
Amdahl equipment and has kept a mix of 
IBM and plug-compatible manufacturers’ 
systems for more than a decade. Simila 
reports that the company’s size makes 
PG&E a “cherished account” for the vari¬ 
ous vendors and eliminates the possibility 
of a vendor punishing the utility by cutting 
back on service when another vendor 
wins a contract. 


NCR services 

CONTINUED FROM PAGE 51 

third-party service, Sugheir said. 

Although he declined to name a specif¬ 
ic discount rate, Sugheir said NCR is 
“prepared to discount on an individual ba¬ 
sis in relation to IBM’s Corporate Service 
Amendment (CSA).” IBM’s CSA, intro¬ 
duced last year, offers discounts from 4% 
to 33% to customers who manage some of 
their own maintenance. 

NCR also offers a discount program 
called Partnership Maintenance, under 
which a customer may receive a service 
discount for establishing a means to track 
problems themselves, such as a help desk. 
But this discount is offered only on NCR 
equipment, Sugheir said. 

NCR Third-Party Services has 6,300 
field personnel in 400 locations in the 
U.S., the vendor said. 


McDonnell 

CONTINUED FROM PAGE 51 

old Series 6000 small-business systems. 

The 6460 is the new high-end model in 
the Tower portion of the 6000 series and 
features up to 4M bytes of memory, 
420M bytes of storage and support for 64 
users, compared with 1M byte of memo¬ 
ry, 225M bytes of storage and support for 
only 32 users offered by the earlier 6425. 

In the Low Boy portion of the 6000 
family, the company added the 6680 with 
support for 4M bytes of memory, 1.5G 
bytes of storage and 96 users. The earlier 
6655 supported 2M bytes of memory, 
486M bytes of disk storage and 64 users. 

The 6260 costs $62,500, and the 
6680 costs $115,500. Prices for the Se¬ 
ries 9200 range from $98,500 for the 
9225 to $253,000 for the 9265. 


Introducing the COLORSCAN/2 



Color Graphics Workstation 


If the success of your business depends on making faster, better 
informed decisions, then the COLORSCAN/2 workstation is 
designed for you. 

Packaged all in one space saving 10" x 15’’ low profile enclo¬ 
sure, the COLORSCAN/2 features both a built-in plug-compatible 
VT™240 text/graphics terminal and a high-performance “next 
generation” PC/MS-DOS® personal system. 

Starting at around $2,000* the COLORSCAN/2 offers many 
technological advancements that work to your advantage in many 
innovative ways. For example: 

• High-performance VT240 and EGA compatible graphics 

• Quiet, diskless networking operation 

• “Smart card” and 3 '/ 2 -inch disk accessories 

• Surface mount technology and custom VLSI 

• Auxiliary battery-backed RAM 

• Choice of Personal System/2™ or VT200-style keyboard 


With its dual capability and high connectivity, you can access 
on-line information from a VAX™ system or other time sharing 
systems while simultaneously running PC/MS-DOS applications 
such as Lotus® 1-2-3® By simply pressing a “hot key,” you can 
switch back and forth from MS-DOS to the VT240 terminal 
sessions. And a “cut and paste” feature lets you extract and 
manipulate information between the two. 

To find out more about how the COLORSCAN/2 can satisfy 
your needs, call Datamedia at 1-800 DMC-INFO. 



rmc 


DATAMEDIA CORPORATION 
The fbsitiue Response" 

11 Trafalgar Square, Nashua, NH 03063 


• Based on manufacturer's suggested retail price. Dealer price may vary. Price excludes taxes, license, freight or options. COLORSCAN is a registered trademark of Datamedia Corporation. VI and VAX are trademarks of 

Digital Equipment Corporation. MS-DOS is a registered trademark of Microsoft Corporation. Personal System/2 Is a trademark of International Business Machines. Lotus and 12 3 are registered trademarks of Lotus Development Corporation. 


56 


COMPUTERWORLD 


AUGUST 10,1987 




























SYSTEMS & PERIPHERALS 


NEW PR 


Processors 

A series of Sun Microsystems, Inc. Sun 3- 
compatible memories said to occupy one 
slot have been announced by Clear- 
point, Inc. 

The SNXRAM frees up four slots in 
the Sun 3/160 and 3/180 for VMEbus ex¬ 
pansion options. It is available in 16M- 
and 24M-byte capacities using lM-bit 
DIP switch dynamic random-access mem¬ 
ories (RAM). The 4M-, 8M- and 12M- 
byte density SNXRAM models use 256K- 
byte DIP switch dynamic RAM. 

The SNXRAM/24M bytes is priced at 
$10,000, and 16M- and 12M-byte capaci¬ 
ty boards cost $7,825 and $5,500, re¬ 
spectively. 

Clearpoint, 99 South St., Hopkinton, 
Mass. 01748. 


Graphics systems 

A preconfigured color graphics seismic 
display station has been introduced by 
Raster Technologies, Inc. 

The Entry Level Model One/80S 
offers 1,280- by 1,024-pixel resolution 
with a 60Hz noninterlaced refresh rate. 
Seismic features include filled/unfilled 
variable-area display with selectable fill 
and overlap, variable density and horizon 
flattening. 

Standard interfaces supported include 
four RS-232 serial ports and a DR11-W 
high-speed parallel direct memory access 
interface. Digital Equipment Corp. 
VT100 terminal capability, Tektronix, 
Inc. 4014 emulation, transformation, hid¬ 
den surface removal and interactive de¬ 
vice support are all standard features. 

With a 19-in. monitor, the system 
costs $17,500. With a 16-in. monitor, it 
costs $15,500. 

Raster Technologies, 2 Robbins Road, 
Westford, Mass. 01886. 


Data storage 

Two Vi-in. reel-to-reel tape drives for 
both high-performance and mid-range 
system backups have been announced by 
Hewlett-Packard Co. 

The HP 7980A is a 6,250 or 1,600 
char./in. tape drive designed for systems 
with disk backup requirements of more 
than 400M bytes. 

The HP 7979A, offering 1,600 
char./in. only, provides for systems with 
disk backup requirements between 100M 
and 500M bytes. Both formats are com¬ 
patible with ANSI standards to allow data 
interchange between HP and non-HP for¬ 
mats. 

Features include automatic tape load¬ 
ing, seven-character alphanumeric front- 
panel display and performance of Read 
and Write operations at 125 in./sec. 

The HP 7980A costs $22,400; the HP 
7979A costs $13,000. 

HP, 1820 Embarcadero Road, Palo 
Alto, Calif. 94303. 

Terminals 

Eastman Kodak Co. has introduced its 
line of Kodak Datashow products for 
computer-image overhead projection. 

The Kodak Datashow system includes 
the Datashow projection pad, a remote 
control and Showmaker software. Op¬ 
tions include paging, blinking, on-screen 

AUGUST 10,1987 


O D U C T S 


pointer, split-screen, random-access and 
automatically timed, preprogrammed se¬ 
quence. The Kodak Datashow system 
costs $1,270. 

The Kodak Datashow composite video 
adapter is a plug-in component that 
makes the transparency system usable 
with computers that have composite vid¬ 
eo signals, such as the Apple Computer, 
Inc. Apple II family. It costs $ 159. 

The Datashow projection pad is a ver¬ 
sion of the Datashow system designed for 
real-time use through a personal comput¬ 
er keyboard. It costs $1,095. 

Eastman Kodak, 343 State St., Roch¬ 
ester, N.Y.14650. 


Printers/Plotters 

The 4/62 color dot matrix printer has 
been announced by Honeywell Bull Ita¬ 
lia. 

The 4/62 offers automatic switching 
from cut sheet to fanfold. It operates at 
120 char./sec. in letter-quality mode with 
a print quality of 60 by 18 dot/char, ma¬ 
trix. Other features include 180 char./ 
sec. print speed in near-letter-quality 
mode and 250 char./sec. in draft mode. 
Seven colors are standard and up to six 
fonts can be used on a page at one time. 
Print width is up to 15 Vi in. 

The 4/62 is priced at $2,160. 

Honeywell Bull Italia, Suite 800, 120 
Howard St., San Francisco, Calif. 94105. 


Power supplies 

An off-line uninterruptible power system 
(UPS) that provides the protection of an 
on-line system has been announced by 

Topaz, Inc. 

The Powermaker UPS consists of an 
internal power conditioner, a battery 
charger, a battery, an inverter, a static 
transfer switch and a surge-suppression 
network. It provides 100 db of common¬ 
mode noise attenuation. If the power fails, 
the Powermaker UPS begins supplying 
AC power to the protected equipment in 
less than one msec, the vendor said. 
Powermaker prices start at $2,500. 
Topaz, 9192 Topaz Way, San Diego, 
Calif. 92123. 



THEY SAID IT 
COULDN’T BE DONE 


We Did It. They said you couldn’t 
access all those databases from one 
terminal or program and up to now 
they were right. Now there is, 
ACCESS/STAR, the only completely 
integrated software for distributed 
data extract and delivery. 

We Deliver It. We turned simple 
connectivity into true data sharing. 
Imbed ACCESS/STAR into your 
program and all databases look 
like local SQL. You can demand data 
from any database and 
ACCESS/STAR will deliver. Using 
ASAP, our terminal interface, users 
can instantly access any database. 

And it is all transparent to the user. 
No knowledge of database languages, 
links or file servers is necessary. 

We Did It Right. ACCESS/STAR’s 
open architecture is based on ANSI 
SQL and industry standard protocols. 
This software solution provides 
powerful standard extraction as well 
as easy-to-use tools for building 
custom extractors. 

Datatrieve, DBMS-32, DEC Rdb are trademarks of Digital 
Equipment Corp 

HP is a trademark of Hewlett-Packard 

DB2, IBM. SQL/DS, are trademarks of International 

Business Machines. 

Encompass is a trademark of Tandem Computers. 


ACCESS/STAR: 

• Extracts data at the field level 

• Supports multiple DBMS systems 

• Transfers data across existing 
communication links 

• Accepts ANSI SQL queries 

• Stores and forwards across 
heterogeneous networks 

• Leverages other connectivity 
products 


We Support It. Complete detailed 
documentation is provided and 
outstanding technical assistance is 
there when you need it. 

You Want It. They said it couldn’t 
be done affordably, but we did it. 
To gain instant access to 
ACCESS/STAR and your 1988 
Connectivity Planning Calendar, call 
us or fill in the information below. 

DB/ACCESS « 

20111 Stevens Creek Blvd. 

Cupertino, CA 95014 
(408) 255-2920 
(800) 982-9911 
FAX (408) 253-7873 






































How our storage products' technology can boost 
your systems productivity. No. 1 in a series. 


The Industry standard 
Our footprint. 



What’s in a direct access storage 
device’s (DASD) footprint? Plenty. 
For one thing, more efficient 
utilization of your data center’s 
floor space. 

Our DASDs take up as much 
as 40% less floor space than the 
“industry standard’s!’You can re¬ 
place two of theirs with three of ours. 




Amdahl Corporation 
1250 East Arques Avenue 
Sunnyvale, CA 94088-3470 


For another, improved reliability. 

Our DASDs’ footprints are small 
because their disk enclosures 
are small enough to stay cool 
without drawing air from their 
environments. 

We seal them in clean rooms, 
so the risk of environmental con¬ 
tamination in your data center 
is next to nil. 


” footprint. 


Our DASDs also consume less 
power, thanks to their small disks, 
and they’re easy to service, so 
downtime goes down, and availa¬ 
bility goes up. 

It all adds up to greater productivity. 

That’s our DASD technology’s 
ultimate value to you. And you can’t 
get it anywhere else. 

For specs on our full line, call your 
local Amdahl representative. 


amdahl 

The\Z/\.LJJE Choice 











IN DEPTH 


End users drive 
benefit analysis 

They get to nominate a project 'Most Likely to Succeed ' 


BY HOWARD MILLER 

N o one would dispute 
the fact that it costs 
something to imple¬ 
ment a computer- 
based information sys¬ 
tem. Nor would 
anyone argue that a 
substantial benefit 
from that investment 
is expected. 

Benefits, however, can range 
from the quantifiable to the in¬ 
tangible. Further, the risk of at¬ 
taining these benefits can vary 
from very low to extremely high. 
Determining the cost of install¬ 
ing a computer-based informa¬ 
tion system is relatively easy, 
but quantifying benefits can be a 
real stumbling block. 

Whereas a cost analysis for a 
computer-based system devel¬ 
ops as the logical outgrowth of a 
feasibility study, a benefit analy¬ 
sis is something that can only be 
user-driven. The user best un¬ 
derstands the form the benefit 
will take. However, because the 
user also understands that there 
is a risk associated with attaining 
that benefit, he has a natural hes¬ 
itancy to express this benefit in 
terms of dollars. 

Step-by-step analysis 

This article focuses on a method 
to facilitate the user-driven ben¬ 
efit analysis. Little will be said 
about cost analysis; for purposes 
of this article, it is assumed that 
cost numbers are readily avail¬ 
able. 

The following benefit analysis 
process is a multiple-step proce- 


Miller is responsible for administrative 
computing at Boston University. He has 
held senior-level positions in systems 
management for more than 20 years. 


dure based on the theory that a 
similarity exists among the kinds 
of benefits derived from a com¬ 
puter-based information system 
and that similar benefits can be 
grouped into classes. However, 
recognizing that there is a risk 
associated with achieving any 
benefit or benefit class, a risk-of- 
attainment factor should be as¬ 
signed to the benefit classes. 

The risk of attainment quanti¬ 
fies the risk associated with 
achieving the benefit. In this 
way, one may develop a comfort 
level for the results of the finan¬ 
cial analysis calculations. A com¬ 
fort level is an objective index in¬ 


dicating how assured the user is 
that the benefits described are 
achievable. The benefit analysis 
process consists of the following 
five steps: 

• Identify the benefit classes. 

• Establish risk of attainment. 

• Complete benefit analysis 
forms. 

• Summarize the benefits. 

• Perform a financial analysis. 

The ability — or lack thereof 
— to quantify a benefit does not 
always reflect its importance to 
an organization. For example, a 
new computer-based informa¬ 
tion system may be required to 
provide a service that is already 


available from the competition. 
The consequence of not install¬ 
ing the system may be loss of 
market share or even having to 
go out of business. Quantifying 
the benefit of implementing this 
computer-based information 
system may be difficult — what 
would be the cost of the lost mar¬ 
ket share or the cost of going out 
of business? 

Conversely, installing a sys¬ 
tem that reduces material and la¬ 
bor costs may be easy to quantify 
and yet may have little impact on 
the strategic performance of a 
company. Therefore, benefits 
can be grouped in the following 
categories from highest to low¬ 
est according to their impact on 
the business: 

Improved strategic per¬ 
formance. This is the benefit 
area that is most difficult to 
quantify and achieve due to the 
esoteric nature of such things as 
improved employee morale and 
better utilization of management 
talent. Business survival is just 
as likely to create new dilemmas 
as they are to resolve existing 
problems. The opportunity for 
excellence is there, but it is mut¬ 
ed. 

Improved management 
control. This area is one of sub¬ 
jective quantification. After im¬ 
plementation, the benefits of im¬ 
proved management control are 
measurable and directly attribut¬ 
able to the computer-based in¬ 
formation system. Prior to im¬ 
plementation, the benefits can 
only be estimated. 

Improved business resulting 
from a direct order-taking sys¬ 
tem is something that can be ac¬ 
curately measured after the sys¬ 
tem is implemented but not 
before installation. Examples of 
improved management control 



WILLIAM CONE 


• Assigning a dollar value to benefits 
• Multiyear analysis 

• Cost avoidance vs. strategic advantage 


AUGUST 10,1987 


COMPUTERWORLD 


59 




























IN DEPTH: USER-DRIVEN BENEFIT ANALYSIS 


Benefit /comfort index table 

Having end users rate a project in terms of its risk or likelihood to 
succeed is not enough; MIS must then superimpose this scale to 
reflect that cost displacement benefits are easier to achieve than 
strategic advantages 


Risk factor 


Benefit class 

Assured 

Likely 

Maybe 

Improve strategic performance 

4 

7 

9 

Improve management control 

2 

5 

8 

Improve cost displacement or avoidance 

1 

3 

6 


CW CHART 


include increased business vol¬ 
ume and improved resource 
management. 

Improved cost displace¬ 
ment or avoidance. This ben¬ 
efit area is the easiest to quantify 
and has the greatest likelihood of 
achieving its stated results. Im¬ 
proved cost displacement or cost 
avoidance is the elimination of 
staff and/or materials used di¬ 
rectly or indirectly to create a 
product or service. 

What is the risk? 

To complete the benefit analy¬ 
sis, each benefit within a benefit 
class is assigned a risk of attain¬ 
ment (see chart above). 

The risk of attainment cate¬ 
gories are defined as follows: 

Assured: Very high proba¬ 
bility that the benefit is achiev¬ 
able (70% to 100% chance). 

Likely: Moderate chance 


that the benefit is achievable 
(31 % to 69% chance). 

Maybe: Very low probability 
that the benefit is achievable 
(0% to 30% chance). Each bene¬ 
fit is also assigned a comfort in¬ 
dex based on the benefit/comfort 
index table. The comfort index is 


a weighting factor, with cost dis¬ 
placement or avoidance given 
the highest weighting while im¬ 
proved strategic performance is 
given the lowest weighting. 

The theory is that cost dis¬ 
placement or avoidance is much 
easier to achieve than improved 



® 




TOWER LIFE STANDS TALL WITH HYDRA 


Direct Channel Attached 
Protocol Converter/Controller 


"HYDRA has exceeded 
lour expectations. We 
are amazed with the 
flexibility and 
simplicity that HYDRA 
offers. We use HYDRA 
to drive laser printers 
as 3211 system 
printers, support 
several types of ASCII 
terminals, and for PC 
m to mainframe file 
transfer. For both 
local and remote 
applications HYDRA 
has been a tremendous 
help. We didn't even 
need a system programmer to set 
everything up." Buddy Allee, Data 
Processing Operations Manager for 
Tower Life Insurance Company. 



minnl 

HYDRA II 


Flexible Because.... 

HYDRA supports virtually any ASCII 
asynchronous RS-232 device including terminals, 
PCs, printers, bar code readers, document 
scanners, etc. You can direct connect or 
communicate from your office, home, or any 
remote location over voice-grade phone lines. 

HYDRA provides 3270-type emulation for ASCII 
terminals and PCs, 1403/3211 system printer and 
328X emulation for serial ASCII printers, and 
supports several PC to mainframe file transfer 
packages. 

HYDRA ensures maximum security with use of 
its multi-level password, call-back, and positive 
log-off security features. 

Easy To Use Because.... 

HYDRA requires minimal set-up for normal use, 
has many popular terminals already defined, and 
can be quickly custom configured from any 
defined terminal or PC. 

Available in 4, 8,16, 32, and 64 port models, 
HYDRA operates on IBM 360/370/43XX/30XX 
and compatible mainframes. 


For full details and your closest HYDRA dealer 
Call 800-55-HYDRA In California call (714)770-2263 
and find out how HYDRA will benefit your data processing center 



Tower Life Insurance Building 
San Antonio, Texas 


fCSVEK is a registered trademark of Tower Life Insurance Company 

IBM is a registered trademark ol International Business Machines 


*fCWl 

iys. 



JDS MICROPROCESSING 

22661 Lambert Street, Suite 206. El Toro, CA 92630 


strategic performance, and, 
therefore, improved strategic 
performance must have a much 
higher return to offset the inher¬ 
ent risk. However, by its very 
nature, improved strategic per¬ 
formance typically has a much 
higher potential return. 

Benefits on paper 

Benefit analysis is the meat of 
the process. MIS assists the user 
in identifying each benefit de¬ 
rived from the computer-based 
system. Each benefit is de¬ 
scribed, quantified, classified and 
assigned a risk factor (Assured, 
Likely, Maybe). Benefits are 
quantified by year, from one to 
nine, so it is necessary to estab¬ 
lish the time span for the analy¬ 
sis. The benefit analysis form 
documents the benefits. Note 
that the organization of this form 
corresponds to the benefit/ 
comfort index table. The benefit 
classes run down the vertical 
axis; risk factors run across the 
horizontal axis. The bold num¬ 
bers in the boxes are the comfort 
indexes. The benefit analysis 
form is completed as follows: 

• Enter the benefit area (such as 
“reduce staffing by one clerk”). 
Use a very descriptive title. 

• Enter an explanation of the 
benefit area, if necessary. 

• Enter the savings (in dollars) 
per year in the appropriate bene¬ 
fit class under the appropriate 
risk of attainment level. 

• Enter an X in each block for the 
year or years that the savings 
will be realized. For example, if 
the benefit is described as a 
$5,000 cost displacement likely 
to occur in Year 2 and is assured 
of also occurring in Years 3 and 
4, then $5,000 is entered in the 
likely cost displacement box; an 
X is placed in Year 2; $5,000 is 
entered in the assured cost dis¬ 


placement box; and an X is 
placed in Years 3 and 4. 

• One benefit analysis form is 
completed for each benefit iden¬ 
tified. 

To clarify this procedure, 
let’s apply this process to a sys¬ 
tem that improves productivity 
sufficiently to reduce a clerical 
staff by one person ($12,000 per 
year). The user is confident the 
position will be eliminated, and 
the job is targeted for eradica¬ 
tion during the second year of 
operation. Finally, the organiza¬ 
tion has agreed it will track only 
the benefits for three years from 
the point of implementation. In 
this scenario, the following is en¬ 
tered on the form: 

Benefit area: Eliminate one 
clerk. 

Explanation: System im¬ 
proves productivity of clerical 
staff sufficiently to reduce staff 
by one person. The learning 
curve associated with the new 
system makes this possible in 
Year 2. 

Benefits: $12,000 is entered 
in the cost displacement or 
avoidance area in the assured 
column, and an X is placed in 2 
and 3 to indicate the savings 
started in Year 2 and continued 
through Year 3. (Had the firm 
agreed to track savings for five 
years, an X would also have been 
placed in Years 4 and 5.) 

The benefit summary (see 
chart page 62) is a recap of the 
details found in the benefit analy¬ 
sis form. One benefit summary is 
compiled for each year in the fol¬ 
lowing manner: 

• List the benefit area from the 
benefit analysis form on the left 
side of the form. 

• Enter the benefit dollars in the 
correct comfort index column 
based on the comfort index num¬ 
bers listed on the benefit 


T Zero. 
Learning 
Curve d 


SPF/PC 


Migrating to the PC is a joy when you're using an editor you already 
know. SPF/PC is the only PC editor with enough mainframe muscle for 
serious work on big files. And, the transition is easy with SPF/PC's 
mainframe edit commands, virtual addressing, utilities, network 
compatibility and much more. 

Want more information? Call or write for a free demonstration diskette. 
SPF/PC, so much like the mainframe, you'll forget you're working on a PC. 


Command Technology 
Corporation 


1900 Mountain Blvd., Oakland, CA 94611 (415) 339-3530 Telex: 509330 


60 


COMPUTERWORLD 


AUGUST 10,1987 




















































WHS 10 SHOW 

YOURHSDAJN 

for MBwcnn 




In a world where 
a startling number of 
products are made to 
standards that are 
somewhat less than 
exacting, NEC pre- 


• tmt h ■ I 1 1 ) 

sents a trio ol easee gro * 


m a 

products that — .--. . 

elevate those standards significantly. 

It’s the APC IV PowerMate™ family of personal business computers: 
PowerMate 1, PowerMate 2 and the multi-user BusinessMateT They’re 
part of a new line of AT-class PCs that give you the kind of power and speed 
you need to take your productivity—and your creativity—to the limit. 

And with the latest addition to the family—our brand new PowerMate 386— 
you can stretch that limit even further. 

So even though life may indeed be a series of compromises, we don’t 
think you should have to settle for one in the office. Not when you can 
get the name of your nearest NECIS reseller just 
by calling 1-800-343-4419 (in MA 617-264-8635). 


In Canada call 1-800-387-4313. 

Or write to NEC Information Systems, 
Department 1610,1414 Massachusetts Ave., 
Boxborough, MA 01719. 



CsC 


Computers and Communications 




































IN DEPTH: USER-DRIVEN BENEFIT ANALYSIS 


analysis form. Repeat the process 
for each benefit until all benefit dol¬ 
lars for that year are entered. 

• Total and enter the comfort index 
columns at the bottom. 

• Calculate a cumulative total (one 

through nine as applicable). Benefit area 

• Repeat this process for each year 
with benefits, preparing one sum¬ 
mary sheet for each benefit year. 


Benefit summary form 

Calculate the dollar value of benefits fora single year in each benefit area and then rate that value based on how certain users are to 
achieve it 


Comfort index 
4 5 


What does it cost? 

The bottom line is the financial anal¬ 
ysis, which consists of three items: 
a bar graph, a payback period calcu¬ 
lation and an internal rate of return 
calculation. To develop the bar 
graph, first take all of the annual 
costs for developing the project and 
for its postimplementation opera¬ 
tion. Then plot the project costs by 
year below the horizontal axis. Cu¬ 
mulative benefits for comfort levels 
1 through 3, 4 through 6 and 7 
through 9 (see chart this page) are 
plotted above the horizontal axis. 

The result is an informative graphic 
representation of both the cost and 
the return at the three points. 

A payback period is then calcu¬ 
lated by dividing cumulative bene- _ 

fits for comfort levels 1 through 3,4 
through 6 and 7 through 9, respectively, 
by the total cost for the project. The re¬ 
sult is the amount of time it will take to re¬ 
cover the investment. 

Next, calculate an internal rate of re¬ 
turn for the cumulative benefits at com¬ 
fort index levels 1 through 3, 4 through 6 


Direct cost displacement 

Keypunch operators 

Warehouse ordering clerks 

Keypunch/data transmission equipment 

$120 

$150 

$114 









Indirect cost displacement 

Reduce inventory carrying cost 

$45 


$20 



$5 




Absorb growth/Cost avoidance 

Headquarters administrative personnel 





$30 





Increase productivity/efficiency 

Buyers 





$35 



$60 


Better control through earlier 
measurement 

Reduce inventory write-offs 

Fewer plant changeovers 

Fewer lost orders, returns 


$875 

$150 

$240 



$475 

$150 

$240 





Improve customer service 

Product availability knowledge 




$140 



$280 


$320 

Total benefit dollars 

$429 

$1,265 

$20 

$140 

$930 

$5 

$280 

$60 

$320 

Cumulative total 

$429 

$1,694 

$1,714 

$1,854 

$2,784 

$2,789 

$3,069 

$3,129 

$3,449 


Cost displacement or avoidance 


Management control 


Strategic performance 


cw CHART 


and 7 through 9 using standard calcula¬ 
tions. The results can be interpreted as 
follows: 

• Computer-based systems offering rates 
of return in excess of the opportunity 
costs of capital for comfort levels 1 
through 3 are always considered a very 



Change Control vs. 

Change and Configuration Control... 
There is a big difference! 

With Change and Configuration Control (CCC®) 
from Softool, you will be able to manage 
individual changes, the relationships between changes, and 
complete software versions and releases as a unit. 

You will be in control! 


CCC is the standard 
for automated change 
and configuration control. 

CCC tracks everything: 

It handles source code, object code, 
executables, job control, data base 
components, procedures, documentation, 
etc. It can reconstruct previous versions 
on demand. It supports all programming 
languages. 

CCC comes ready to use: 

It provides you with a turnkey to start 
productive work immediately. CCC is an 


9 


integrated system. Other vendors require 
multiple products to perform only a subset 
of the functions that CCC handles. 

CCC is a proven product: 

Over 1,500 Softool products are installed 
worldwide. CCC is supported on: 

DEC VAX (VMS and ULTRIX) • IBM 370, 
30XX and 43XX (MVS/SP, MVS/XA, 
and VM/CMS) • Honeywell (GCOS 8) • 

DG (AOS/VS) • Sun Microsystems (UNIX) • 
Gould (MPX). 

Call today for more details, a hands-on 
demonstration, or for information on 
the next seminar in your area. 

- 


Softool Corporation 

340 South Kellogg Avenue • Goleta, California 93117 • (805) 683-5777, ext. 100 • Telex: 658344 


good investment. 

• Systems that do not offer a rate of re¬ 
turn in excess of the opportunity cost of 
capital for comfort levels 1 through 3, but 
do so for comfort levels 4 through 6, are a 
marginal investment. 

• Systems that do not offer a rate of re¬ 
turn in excess of the opportunity cost of 
capital for comfort levels 1 through 3 or 4 
through 6, but do so for comfort levels 7 
through 9, are always a poor investment. 

• Never invest in projects that do not of¬ 
fer a rate of return in excess of the oppor¬ 
tunity cost of capital for comfort levels 1 
through 3,4 through 6 or 7 through 9. 

Making this process easy to use is key 
to employing the benefit analysis process 
effectively. The procedure described 
here lends itself well to a personal com¬ 
puter spreadsheet application. If you take 
the time to initially set up the forms and 
calculations, a significant amount of 
drudgery can be removed from the pro¬ 


cess in successive iterations or in succes¬ 
sive applications. 

Sit down with the potential user of the 
computer-based information system and 
go through each of the benefit areas. As¬ 
sist the potential system user in establish¬ 
ing a dollar value for the benefit. 

Finally, I suggest incorporating this 
process into a formal or structured devel¬ 
opment methodology for projects that are 
projected to exceed some targeted invest¬ 
ment level, such as $25,000 to $50,000. 
It is hard to justify the manpower invest¬ 
ment required to go through the benefit 
analysis process for smaller projects. 

Remember the proper role of an infor¬ 
mation services professional is to act as a 
facilitator in the benefit analysis process. 
The system user understands the sys¬ 
tem’s benefits. The information services 
professional, who understands the pro¬ 
cess, can reduce bureaucracy and allevi¬ 
ate hesitancy. • 



with 

CTG/DATAWARE 


Save money, time, and manpower on your conversion project with CTG/ 
Dataware. Our skilled specialists work with you to ensure a smooth, timely, 
cost-effective conversion. 


COBOL TO COBOL 
RPG TO COBOL 
RPG TO PL/1 
DOS TO MVS 


ASSEMBLER TO COBOL 
EASYCODER TO COBOL 
AUTOCODER TO COBOL 
PL/1 TO COBOL 


CTG/Dataware has the total solution — software, methodology, and support 
services — to help you change hardware, programming languages, or operat¬ 
ing systems smoothly and quickly. 

Call the conversion specialists, CTG/Dataware: 1-800-367-2687 


Computer Task Group Inc. 
Dataware Conversion Services 


3095 Union Road 
Orchard Park, New York 14127-1214 
(716) 674-9310 TELEX: 510-100-2155 


62 


COMPUTERWORLD 


AUGUST 10,1987 






















































MANAGEMENT 


TAKING 

CHARGE 



David Ludlum 


Stopping 
the buck 

As information systems manag¬ 
ers aspire to broader business 
roles — or find themselves 
forced into them — one of the 
most crucial challenges they 
face is the need to effectively del¬ 
egate responsibility. The same 
has always been true of informa¬ 
tion systems professionals 
moving into management. 

That need presents upward¬ 
ly mobile professionals and man¬ 
agers with the opportunity to 
garner some practical lessons 
from the partial paralysis in¬ 
flicted on the Reagan adminis¬ 
tration by the exposure of the 
National Security Council’s ef¬ 
forts to run guns to Iran in ex¬ 
change for hostages and to di¬ 
vert proceeds to arm 
Nicaraguan rebels. 

Analyses of the Iran-Contra 
affair have repeatedly pointed to 
a breakdown of Ronald Rea¬ 
gan’s characteristic hands-off 
management style as one of the 
major reasons that the program 
was allowed to gather momen¬ 
tum until it spun out of control. 

Since his days as governor of 
California, Reagan has been 
known for a management style 
characterized by delegation — 
avoiding operational details 
while concentrating on a handful 
of fundamental principles. Ob¬ 
viously, the philosophy worked 
well, as Reagan was elected to a 
Continued on page 70 


Guide scouts end users, CIM 

Telecommunications, DB2are also major concerns, president says 


John Nack, manager of the pro¬ 
cessing network division at Cat¬ 
erpillar, Inc. in Peoria, Ill., is the 
only person to have been elected 
to two terms as president of 
Guide International, Inc., the or¬ 
ganization for users of large IBM 
systems. 

Nack, whose second two-year 
term ends in November, was in¬ 
terviewed recently by Compu¬ 
te rwo rid staff members Stanley 
Gibson, Michael Sullivan- 
Trainor and David Ludlum in 
Boston at Guide’s 68th meeting, 
which was attended by some 
4,600 representatives of the 
group’s corporate membership. 

For Guide members, is this 
really “The Year of the 
Customer?” 



for a number of years. 


John Nack 

I don’t think this is the year of 
the customer any more than pre¬ 
vious years, other than in the use 
of the phrase. We are not getting 
a whole lot more attention be¬ 
cause it’s the year of the custom¬ 
er, because we were getting a lot 
of attention in the first place and 
we had been getting attention 


IBM seems to be a 
little more open 
these days, with 
regard to the press 
and analysts, 
about future prod¬ 
ucts. Is your com¬ 
pany getting more 
information than 
you did in previous 
years? 

No. There still are no prean¬ 
nouncements at all. But there 
has been a very open dialogue in 
recent years. In the last four or 
five years, it has been getting 
more and more open. 


Your view is that IBM is 
now trying to bring some 


INTERNATIONAL BANKING 


MIS profit, Swedish style 


BY JANET FIDERIO 

CW STAFF 


W hen employees receive their 
salaries by direct deposit in 
Stockholm, chances are their 
money won’t stay in their 
checking accounts for long. 
Because of aggressive management of in¬ 
formation technology, Swedish banks can of¬ 
fer to deduct customers’ checking account 
funds and transfer them directly to creditors. 
The banks do this to pay not only monthly 
bills such as mortgages but also anything 
from purchases of stocks and bonds from the 
Swedish stock exchange to child-care ex¬ 
penses. 

For example, if you worked in Stockholm 
and banked with Skandinaviska Enskilda 
Continued on page 68 



of that openness to groups 
other than Guide? 

Yes. I believe that they are now 
sharing more openly with the 
press and other customer groups 
things they used to share with 
us. However, with us, it has nev¬ 
er reached the point where we 
believe we are seeing their en¬ 
tire strategic plan and product 
announcements in advance of 
the public. 

With regard to the recent cre¬ 
ation of the Application Systems 
Division, I had not heard any ru¬ 
mors about it until we came 
here. It was a closely held secret 
from us. 

What do you think of the 
creation of the new divi¬ 
sion? 

It is hard to tell what to think 
about it yet. I haven’t sorted it all 
out yet, but it would seem to me 
that anything they can do to em¬ 
phasize applications develop¬ 
ment — organizationally or 
whatever — is good news for all 
of us. 

Are there any hot topics 
that seem to be coming up 
among members? 

No more and no less than usual. 
This is not an event. This goes 
on continuously, this process. 
Three times a year we get to¬ 
gether, and we exchange infor¬ 
mation. 

However, one of the things 
we are doing now is putting an 
emphasis on CIM [computer-in¬ 
tegrated manufacturing]; trying 
to get our organization to have a 
better representation among 
those who work with CIM, such 
as manufacturing engineers — 
Continued on page 69 

Inside 

• Book review: AI, robotics 
gurus look to the future. Page 
64. 

• Calendar: Conferences, 
exhibitions, meetings. Page 
66 . 


We’ve installed over 2 billion bytes of 308X memory. 


Cambridge has provided memo¬ 
ries for four generations of IBM® 
mainframes, right through 308X 
systems. We’ve served a list of 
customers that includes virtually 
all of the 50 largest data process¬ 
ing operations in the U.S. Our 
STOR/8000™ universal memory 


modules fit any 308X, and they’re 
proven products that we’ve been 
shipping for three years. For more 
information about our aggressive 
pricing, flexible leasing and 
upgrade plans, nation¬ 
wide service, and available 
life-time warranty, call toll 


free (800) 325-5565. In Mass., call 
(617) 890-6000. Or write Cambridge 
Memories, 360 Second Avenue, 
Waltham, MA 02154. 


CAMBRIDGE 

Cambridge Memories Division of Cambex Corp. 


Stor/8000 is a trademark of Cambex Corp. IBM is a registered trademark of International Business Machines Corp. 


AUGUST 10,1987 


COMPUTERWORLD 


63 









































MANAGEMENT 


BOOK REVIEW 

The brave new world of thinking machines 


BY CHARLES P. LECHT 

IDG NEWS SERVICE 


The Tomorrow Makers 

By Grant Fjermedal 

Want some fun summer reading? Subti¬ 
tled A Brave New World of Living Brain 
Machines, this book chronicles the au¬ 
thor’s visits with people who work on the 
frontiers of the computer world. 

Fjermedal traveled extensively in the 
U.S. and Japan to write this book, visiting 
such erudite places as MIT, Harvard Uni¬ 
versity, Carnegie-Mellon University, the 
U.S. Naval Research Laboratory, The 


Smithsonian Institution and Japan’s Wa- 
seda, Tsukuba and Tokyo universities. 

The author also visits lesser known sci¬ 
entists, like those working in the back 
rooms of our most advanced laboratories 
— and even hackers working at home. 
This makes The Tomorrow Makers a re¬ 
freshing work unburdened by stale state¬ 
ments from the often quoted. 

The book is divided into three parts: 
The Download Factor, Educating Baby 
and Outrageous Worlds. 

1. The Download Factor. At the 
outset, we are offered the concept of 
downloading as posited by Hans Moravec 


of Carnegie-Mellon’s world-class robotics 
laboratory. This involves a process not 
unlike cloning in its final effect but differ¬ 
ent in its method. It does not involve cre¬ 
ation of the “copy” through the use of bio¬ 
genetics; rather, a computer simulation of 
the original is achieved by both medical 
and computer scientists. 

If the simulation were good enough, 
the prospect of downloading our function¬ 
al selves into the distant future would be 
possible. The issue of whether the series 
of man-made replicants could constitute a 
self-conscious continuum of the original is 
unresolved. 


As dogmatic as theologians may ap¬ 
pear in disputing the ideas that arise 
through consideration of this, so do our 
scientists appear to say it is possible. 

From here on, we begin an exploration 
of the world of robotics, computer simula¬ 
tions of intelligence, awareness, motor 
control — you name it. A virtual smorgas¬ 
bord of artificial intelligence hardware 
and software is offered. Dessert comes in 
the form of the speculations and rumina¬ 
tions of scientists. True, they seem a bit 
possessed by the technological fare they 
so gleefully describe, but their enthusi¬ 
asm is refreshing. What’s the good of it all 
if we cannot dream? 

2. Educating Baby. This section 
presents us some classic and not-so-clas- 
sic arguments on the feasibility of creat¬ 
ing thinking machines and the impact 
such machines could have on our future. 
Dialogues with current thinking machines 
and a potpourri of opinions on what these 
dialogues mean are offered. 

What is particularly compelling about 
this section of the book is the very human 
emanations of those machines — not to 
undervalue the scientific fare. 

It is natural that the thinking machine 
issue be accompanied by a religious one. 
St. Thomas, a world-class logician and 
perhaps the greatest Catholic scientist/ 
cleric, deposited the human soul in the in¬ 
tellect and said man possessed it. But 
thinking takes place in the intellect. 

Accordingly, if we say that machines 
think, some feel that this may lead to the 
conclusion that machines have a soul — 
or worse, that man has none. The theo¬ 
logical issue regarding man and machine 
is widely and wildly covered in this fasci¬ 
nating section of Fjermedal’s book. 

3. Outrageous Worlds. The name 
of the last part of The Tomorrow Makers 
just begins to hint at the really way-out 
stuff it holds. Here, we forget about the 
upsides and downsides of whether or not 
machines think. The present time is what 
it is. The question is, Where are we going? 

Are biological computing devices pos¬ 
sible? And what about androids, like those 
found in science-fiction movies like Blade 
Runner? Or HAL, Stanley Kubrick’s 
master control computer in his film inter¬ 
pretation of Arthur C. Clarke’s 2001: A 
Space Odyssey ? 

Will computer technology ultimately 
become so advanced that we can expect it 
to replicate earth-based factories on dis¬ 
tant planets without human help? And 
that they will await our arrival? Can we 
become pure mind? 

On the last page of the book, Fjermedal 
writes, “There would come a point when 
we could leave the technology behind and 
step into the spiritual, perhaps wrapping 
ourselves into the gentle folds of Ein¬ 
stein’s space-time continuum. But even 
short of that, long before we learn to 
breathe deeply and pass through time, we 
may be able to deploy such an array of 
self-replicating robots for terraforming 
that we will be able to pass through the 
stars, leaving in our wake newly formed 
cradles of life.” 

Hardcover, $18.95, 261 pages, ISBN 
0025385607, by MacMillan Publishing 
Co., New York, 1987. 

Publishers wishing to have their books 
considered for review can direct books, 
prepublication galleys, press releases, 
catalogs or other information to George 
Harrar, Book Review Editor, Computer- 
world, P.O. Box 9171, 375 Cochituate 
Road, Framingham, Mass. 01701. 


5,950,000 Shares 


.... . 




Everex Systems, Inc. 

Common Stock 


Price $11 Per Share 


Upon request, a copy ot the Prospectus describing these securities end the business ot the 
Company may be obtained within any State from any Underwriter who may legally 
distribute it within such State The securities are ottered only by means ot the Prospectus, 
and this announcement is neither an otter to sell nor a solicitation ot any otter to buy 

4,950,000 Shares 

This portion ot the ottering is being ottered in the United States by the undersigned. 

Goldman, Sachs & Co. Shearson Lehman Brothers Inc. 

Bear, Stearns & Co. Inc. The First Boston Corporation Alex. Brown & Sons Dillon, Read & Co. Inc. 

Incorporated 

Donaldson, Lufkin & Jenrette Drexel Burnham Lambert Hambrecht & Quist E. F. Hutton & Company Inc. 

Securities Corporation --*“'* * -*“'* 

Kidder, Peabody & Co. 

Incorporated 

Morgan Stanley & Co. 

Incorporated 

Robertson, Colman & Stephens L. F. Rothschild & Co. Salomon Brothers Inc Smith Barney, Harris Upham & Co. 

Incorporated Incorporated 

Wertheim Schroder & Co. Dean Witter Reynolds Inc. Advest, Inc. Bateman Eichler, Hill Richards 

Incorporated Incorporated 

Sanford C. Bernstein & Co., Inc. William Blair & Company Blunt Ellis & Loewi Boettcher & Company, Inc. 

Incorporated 

J. C. Bradford & Co. Cable, Howse & Ragen Cowen & Co. Dain Bosworth Eberstadt Fleming Inc. 

Incorporated Incorporated 

First Albany Corporation First Southwest Company 


Incorporated 

Lazard Freres & Co. 


Incorporated 

Merrill Lynch Capital Markets 


PaineWebber Incorporated 


Montgomery Securities 
Prudential-Bache Capital Funding 


A. G. Edwards & Sons, Inc. 

Furman Selz Mager Dietz & Birney 

Incorporated 

Janney Montgomery Scott Inc. 

Ladenburg, Thalmann & Co. Inc. 

Morgan Keegan & Company, Inc. Moseley Securities Corporation Needham & Company, Inc. 

Neuberger & Berman The Ohio Company Oppenheimer & Co., Inc. Piper, Jaffray & Hopwood 

Incorporated 

Prescott, Ball & Turben, Inc. Raymond James & Associates, Inc. The Robinson-Humphrey Company, Inc. 
Stephens Inc. Stifel, Nicolaus & Company Sutro & Co. Thomson McKinnon Securities Inc. 

Incorporated 


Howard, Weil, Labouisse, Friedrichs 

Incorporated 

Johnson, Lane, Space, Smith & Co., Inc. 
Legg Mason Wood Walker 

Incorporated 

Moseley Securities Corporation 


Interstate Securities Corporation 
Johnston, Lemon & Co. 

Incorporated 

McDonald & Company 

Securities, Inc. 


Sutro & Co. 

Incorporated 

Wheat, First Securities, Inc. L.H. Alton & Company Birr, Wilson Securities, Inc. Carolina Securities Corporation 
The Chicago Corporation Crowell, Weedon & Co. Daniels & Bell, Inc. D. A. Davidson & Co. First Manhattan Co. 

Incorporated 

Cyrus J. Lawrence WR Lazard Securities Corp Parker/Hunter Seidler Amdec Securities Inc. 

--*-'* Incorporated 


Incorporated 


Swergold, Chefitz & Sinsabaugh, Inc. 


Van Kasper & Company 


Wedbush Securities, Inc. 


1,000,000 Shares 

This portion ot the ottering is being ottered outside the United States by the undersigned. 

Goldman Sachs International Corp. Shearson Leahman Brothers International 

Deutsche Bank Capital Markets Limited IMI Capital Markets (UK) Ltd. Morgan Stanley International 

The Nikko Securities Co., (Europe) Ltd. Nomura International Limited Salomon Brothers International Limited 
Swiss Bank Corporation International Limited 
S. G. Warburg Securities 


Vereins- und Westbank 

Akflengesellschaft 

Yamaichi International (Europe) Limited 


July 29, 1987 


64 


COMPUTERWORLD 


AUGUST 10,1987 




















© 1987 Hewlett-Packard Co IS02710 



Order HP Workstations. 
Save $ 1.89. 

Bundled PC Workstation Solutions 
from Hewlett-Packard. 

Buying workstations can be quite 
a headache. 

Evaluating people’s needs, surveying 
available components, ordering, testing 
and supporting them can turn into a time- 
consuming hassle. 

But because we monitor the way 
people work with PCs, we’ve learned to 
configure and package—bundle together— 
the most efficient hardware/software 
combinations for the job. 

Our HP Vectra PC workstations come 
specifically configured for secretarial, pro¬ 
fessional or desktop publishing needs. 

They work in a networked environ¬ 
ment. As your needs grow, they can be 
upgraded. 

They’re all IBM AT-compatible, and 
they’re all available now. 

So to choose the right workstations, 
all you have to choose is HP. 

It’s one more example of how the com¬ 
pany that never stops asking “What if...” 
makes life easier and more productive for 
you. Call 1 800 367-4772, Dept. 282Y. 

h B HEWLETT 
r PACKARD 







MANAGEMENT 


C A L E 


AUG. 16-22 

The Tenth Annual McCormack & 
Dodge User Conference. Chicago, 
Aug. 16-20 — Contact: M&D, 1225 
Worcester Road, Natick, Mass. 01760. 

National Computer Graphics Associ¬ 
ation CAD/CAM ’87 Conference 
and Exposition. Boston, Aug. 17-20 — 
Contact: NCGA, Suite 200, 2722 Merri- 
lee Drive, Fairfax, Va. 22031. 

1987 International Conference on 
Parallel Processing. St. Charles, Ill., 
Aug. 17-21 — Contact: Sartaj K. Sahni, 
Department of Computer Science, Uni¬ 
versity of Minnesota, 136 Lind Hall, Min¬ 
neapolis, Minn. 55455. 

Techdoc Eleven: Graphic Communi¬ 
cations Association’s Eleventh An¬ 
nual Conference and Exhibition. San 

Francisco, Aug. 18-20 — Contact: GCA, 
Suite 604, 1730 N. Lynn St., Arlington, 
Va. 22209. 

Information Forum for Local Gov¬ 
ernment. Dallas, Aug. 19-20 — Con¬ 
tact: Infomart, Administrative Offices, 
Suite 6308, 1950 Stemmons Freeway, 
Dallas, Texas 75207. 


AUG. 23-29 

Image Scanning and Processing. 

Monterey, Calif., Aug. 23-25 — Contact: 
Gail Montgomery, Institute for Graphic 
Communication, 375 Commonwealth 
Ave., Boston, Mass. 02115. 

Share 69. Chicago, Aug. 23-28 — Con¬ 
tact: Share, Inc., Ill E. Wacker Drive, 
Chicago, Ill. 60601. 

Tex Users Group’s Annual Confer¬ 
ence. Seattle, Aug. 24-26 — Contact: 
Tex Users Group, c/o American Mathe¬ 
matical Society, P.O. Box 9506, Provi¬ 
dence, R.I. 02940. 

The Omni User Second Annual 
Technical Conference (on IBM’s 
System/34, 36 and 38). Chicago, 
Aug. 25 — Contact: The Omni User, P.O. 
Box A 3031, Chicago, Ill. 60690. 

The Computer and Automated Sys¬ 
tems Association of the SME clinic 
on Voice Recognition Applications 
in Manufacturing. Chicago, Aug. 25- 
26 — Contact: Nancy A. Loerch, Society 
of Manufacturing Engineers, P.O. Box 
930, One SME Drive, Dearborn, Mich. 
48121. 

First Conference on Speech Tech¬ 
nology in Healthcare. San Francisco, 
Aug. 26-27 — Contact: Registrar, Insti¬ 
tute for Medical Record Economics, 121 
Mount Vernon St., Boston, Mass. 02108. 

Software Contracts. Seattle, Aug. 27- 
28 — Contact: Registrar, Batelle Semi¬ 
nars Program, P.O. Box C-5395, 4000 
N.E. 41st St., Seattle, Wash. 98105. Also 
being held Sept. 14-15 in Boston and Oct. 
5-6 in Chicago. 


AUG. 30-SEPT. 5 


The National Conference on Net- 


N D A R 


work Publishing. Dallas, Aug. 31-Sept. 
2 — Contact: Interactive Features, Inc., 
28 V 2 Cornelia St., New York, N.Y. 
10014. 

Show CASE Conference II. St. Louis, 
Sept. 1-2 — Contact: Center for the 
Study of Data Processing, Campus Box 
1141, Washington University, One 
Brookings Drive, St. Louis, Mo. 63130. 

Computer Aided Publishing CAP’87 
West. Los Angeles, Sept. 1-3 — Con¬ 
tact: Computer Aided Publishing CAP, 
Suite 200, 90 W. Montgomery Ave., 
Rockville, Md. 20850. 


5th Anniversary PC Expo. New York, 
Sept. 1-3 — Contact: PC Expo, 333 Syl¬ 
van Ave., Englewood Cliffs, N.J. 07632. 

Thirteenth International Confer¬ 
ence on Very Large Data Bases. 
Brighton, England, Sept. 1-4 — Contact: 
VLDB 87, The Conference Department, 
British Computer Society, 13 Mansfield 
St., London, UK W1M0BP. 


SEPT. 6-12 

Banque ’87 — The 6th European 
Trade Fair for Techniques and Or¬ 
ganization in Banking. Copenhagen, 
Sept. 7-9 — Contact: Bella Center A/S, 
Center Blvd., 2300 Kobenhavn S, Den¬ 
mark. 


SIBOS: SWIFT’s International 

Banking Operations Seminar. Mon¬ 
treal, Sept. 7-11 — Contact: Society for 
Worldwide Interbank Financial Telecom¬ 
munication S.C., Ave. Ernest Solvay 81, 
B-1310 La Hulpe, Belgium. 

Decworld ’87. Boston, Sept. 8-18 — 
Contact: Public Relations Department, 
Digital Equipment Corp., 200 Baker 
Ave., Concord, Mass. 01742. 

1987 Capital Microcomputer Users 
Forum. Washington, D.C., Sept. 9-10 
— Contact: Jackie Voigt, National Trade 
Publications, Inc., Suite 400, 2111 Eisen¬ 
hower Ave., Alexandria, Va. 22314. 

The Desktop Publishing Confer- 


Learn how to make CD-ROM 

Come to CD-ROM Expo, September 21-23- the first user-oriented 


The momentum is building. If you’re a user or 
supplier of information, there’s no escape. CD-ROM 
is in your future. 

You need a better understanding of CD-ROM 
now. You need to know now how the new optical 
publishing and storage systems work. You need a 
handle now on what’s available, what’s coming — 
and how you can harness CD-ROM’s power. 

Get your FREE ticket* to CD-ROM Expo while 
tickets are still available. And while there’s still time, 


give your career a boost. Register for two in-depth 
tutorials to help you take advantage of this revolu¬ 
tionary new technology. 

Don’t miss this show! Meet top suppliers. Ex¬ 
change ideas, insights, and experiences with today’s 
pioneering users. Ask questions. Get answers you 
can use in the months and years ahead. 

Sharpen your CD-ROM skills now — whether 
you’re already buying and using, or planning for 
tomorrow. Don’t wait until it’s too late! 


Day One Monday, September 21 

Introductory and advanced tutorials that put you at the forefront of 
the CD-ROM revolution. Choose two informative, half-day tutorials 
taught by the BEST in the industry. By the end of the day, you’ll 
know what to ask exhibitors and how to judge the hardware, soft¬ 
ware and applications that are inevitably in your future. 


Choose the tutorials that will profit you the 
most (select one morning and one after¬ 
noon tutorial). 

9:15 a.m • 12:30 p.m. 

T-l Introduction to CD-ROM Industry, 
Markets, Futures 

This panoramic overview will introduce you 
to the technology, applications, markets, 
participants and trends in the CD-ROM 
industry. You will leam about key hardware 
and software elements needed to success¬ 
fully utilize the technology, and criteria to 
evaluate the cost-vs-payoff equation of 
CD-ROM applications. For: Beginners, us¬ 
ers-to-be, and others who want an over¬ 
view of CD-ROM basics. 

T-2 Preparing Databases for CD-ROM, 
including catalogs and lists 

End users or vendors planning a CD-ROM 
application will find this session invaluable 
for exploring database formats, indexing, 
searching systems, display formats and oth¬ 
er practical issues. Also included will be the 
role of consultants and turnkey package 
suppliers, and problems of maintaining 
quality and timeliness of information once 
released. For: Publishers and user informa¬ 
tion systems and records management ex¬ 
ecutives. 

T-3 CD-ROM Technology: Hardware 

This session covers the equipment technol¬ 
ogy side of CD-ROM. in the context of 
information storage sub-systems including 
magnetic storage, optical discs, erasable 
discs, CD/I and WORM Discussions will 


include laser reading/recording methods 
and reading and error checking/correction. 
Drive topics will include standalone, 
ganged, networked and cartridge opera¬ 
tions; production of discs; and aspects of 
implementing multi-drive, multi-user appli¬ 
cations, including interface and service 
questions. For: Technically and product- 
oriented professionals interested in a sys- 
tems-level understanding of CD-ROM. 

T-4 CD-ROM As An In-House Publish¬ 
ing Application 

Attend this tutorial to examine the suitabil¬ 
ity of CD-ROM as a replacement for paper 
and microfilm/fiche methods of publishing 
catalogs, parts lists, service and software 
manuals, directories and databases of all 
sorts. Attendees will discuss questions of 
economics, frequency of updating, trans¬ 
mission costs, security and access, training 
and equipment/viewer implementation. 

The session will also compare in-house 
production versus outside consultants and 
implementors. For: MIS. records manage¬ 
ment. field support and training profession¬ 
als. 

1:30-4:30 p.m. 

T-5 CD-ROM Technology: Software 

This session will look in detail at each step 
of CD-ROM usage via software, beginning 
with the user interface, indexing tech¬ 
niques, interaction with applications soft¬ 
ware including MS-DOS Extensions, and 
implications of standards issues (i.e., file 
formats. High Sierra, and others). Discus¬ 


sions will include problems of off-CD-ROM 
use of data and unauthorized reproduction. 
For: Professionals interested in the effect 
of software on the flow of information from 
disc to application. 

T-6 Authoring Systems Workshop 

Register for this session for detailed expo¬ 
sure to the tools needed to create the CD- 
ROM database, starting with a mass of data 
and ending with a useable application. You 
will learn about premastering, mastering, 
and service/equipment/programming ap¬ 
proaches, including alternatives such as in- 
house and out-of-house consultants and 
turnkey suppliers. For: Professionals with 
expected responsibilities for managing CD- 
ROM product development. 

T-7 MIS Applications for CD-ROM 
and Optical Memory 

This session examines where CD-ROM fits 
in the MIS chain. You will become familiar 
with CD-ROM's suitability for different types 
of databases, including financial and other 
numerical bases, with attention to record 
length, speed, frequency of access, update 
scheduling, security/integration and backup 
requirements. Discussions will also include 
networking of drives, personal computers 
and other workstations/mainframes. For: 
MIS-experienced and systems/database 
management professionals. 

T-8 Using CD-ROM in Expert Systems 

The massive storage potential in CD-ROM. 
along with its low cost and reliability, make 
possible advanced expert or artificial intelli¬ 
gence applications ranging from emergen¬ 
cy medicine to point-of-sales retail. This 
session will introduce some of the applica¬ 
tions and the problems providers face with 
CD-ROM equipment in public or severe 
environments. For: Professionals who work 
with intelligent, educational, or decision- 
support systems and who plan to use CD- 
ROM technologies. 


66 


COMPUTERWORLD 


AUGUST 10,1987 

















MANAGEMENT 


ence. Santa Clara, Calif., Sept. 9-12 — 
Contact: Seybold Seminars, 6922 Wildlife 
Road, Malibu, Calif. 90265. 


nati, Sept. 13-17 — Contact: Les Pacca, 
NAHU, P.O. Box 2037, Willingboro, NJ. 
08046. 


ment, Cartlidge & Associates, Inc., Suite 
M-259, 1101 S. Winchester Blvd., San 
Jose, Calif. 95128. 


Distribution/Computer Fall Expo 
’87. New Brunswick, N.J., Sept. 10-11 
— Contact: C. S. Report, Inc., P.O. Box 
453, Exton, Pa. 19341. 


SEPT. 13-19 

Vaulting the Barriers to EFT Suc¬ 
cess. Washington, D.C., Sept. 13-15 — 
Contact: Linda Munday, Electronic Funds 
Transfer Association, Suite 1000, 1726 
M St. N.W., Washington, D.C. 20036. 


The First Annual Conference on Ex¬ 
pert Sytems in Financial Institu¬ 
tions. New York, Sept. 14-15 — Con¬ 
tact: Conference Administrator, Institute 
for International Research, Inc., Suite 
600, 9301 Wilshire Blvd., Beverly Hills, 
Calif. 90210 

Atre Annual Forum on Data Base. 

New York, Sept. 14-16 — Contact: Atre 
International Consultants, Inc., P.O. Box 
727,16 Elm Place, Rye, N.Y. 10580. 


13th National Conference of North Data Storage 87. Santa Clara, Calif., 
American Honeywell Users. Cincin- Sept. 14-16 — Contact: Forum Manage- 



CD-ROM conference and exposition. 


Days Two & Three 

Tuesday & Wednesday, September 22 & 23 

Explore your options! Learn from experts in the development, use, 
and marketing of CD-ROM in over 35 one-hour conference sessions 
on subjects such as: 

• Product and market issues • MIS integration • Industry standards 

• Capabilities of CD-ROM technology • Producing CD-ROM • Systems specifications 

• User panel discussions • CD-ROM publishing • Organizational implications 

• Distribution channels • Copyright issues 


7th Annual Conference on Control, 
Audit & Security of IBM Systems. 

Chicago, Sept. 14-17 — Contact: MIS 
Training Institute, 4 Brewster Road, Fra¬ 
mingham, Mass. 01701. 

Integrated Manufacturing Solu¬ 
tions ’87. Long Beach, Calif., Sept. 14- 
18 — Contact: Intertec Communications, 
Inc., Building 33-34, 2472 Eastman Ave., 
Ventura, Calif. 93003. 

1987 Electronic Printer and Pub¬ 
lishing Conference. Miami, Sept. 14- 
18 — Contact: Jean O’Toole, CAP Inter- 



Conference: 

September 21-23, 1987 
Exposition: 

September 22-23, 1987 
The Roosevelt Hotel 
New York City 


Who should attend 

End users and information providers in: 

• Publishing • Training 

• Finance • MIS 

• Library services • Health care and insurance 

• Information services • Product and software support 


• Government 

• Economics 

• Engineering 

• Legal services 


CD-ROM Expo is co-sponsored by CD-ROM Re¬ 
view. the Magazine of Compact-Disc Storage and 
by LINK Resources Corp., the leading research 
and consulting firm analyzing new electronic in¬ 
formation, communications and entertainment 
services and technologies. CD-ROM Expo and 
Communication Networks are produced by IDG 
Conference Management Group All are Interna¬ 
tional Data Group Companies. 


Return Registration Form to: CD-ROM Expo, P.O. Box 9171, Framingham, MA 01701-9171, 


or call Dorothy Ferriter TOLL FREE 800-343-6474, ext. 327 
(in Mass, call collect 617-879-0700, ext. 327). 

Registrations cancelled later than September 10, 1987 are subject to a $50.00 service 
charge. Registrations may be transferred at no charge. 

Note: All prices include tutorial materials and lunch on Monday, September 21, coffee 
breaks and admission to exhibits. 


Registration Form 

□ YES, I want to learn how to make CD-ROM work for 
me by attending CD-ROM Expo, September 21-23, 1987, 
The Roosevelt Hotel, New York City. 

□ Tutorials plus full admission to the two-day Conference 
and Expo, including over 35 one-hour conferences plus 
exhibits — Mon.- Wed., Sept. 21-23. Choose one morning 
and one afternoon tutorial: 

Morning Tutorial No. T-- 


,o Exhibit ww w 

awn readers of comp receive a\ 

Special to rea no w ana „ood 

(or exhibit ° n ' y \ ^vices vendors m 


Name _ 


Title 


Afternoon Tutorial No. T-_ 


$690.00 


□ Tutorials plus Expo — Monday, Sept. 21, including 
admission to exhibits on Tues. and Wed., Sept. 22-23. 
(Does not include conferences.) Choose one morning 
and one afternoon tutorial: 


Company 

Street_ 

City _ 


State- 


Zip 


Telephone ( 


) 


Ext:_ 


Morning Tutorial No. T-_ 


Afternoon Tutorial No. T-. 


□ Check enclosed. Make payble to CD-ROM Expo □ American Express 

□ Bill me □ MasterCard 

□ Bill company (P.O. "_) □ VISA/Bank Americard 


$395.00 


□ Send my free admission ticket to the exhibits only 

□ Send me more information about CD-ROM Expo 

AUGUST 10,1987 


Card No. 
Signature 


Expiration Date 


CW2 


national, Inc., One Snow Road, 
Marshfield, Mass. 02050. 

ICCC-ISDN ’87 . . . Evolving to 
ISDN in North America. Dallas, Sept. 

15- 17 — Contact: International Council 
for Computer Communication, c/o Bell 
Communications Research Corp., Room 
1B349, 290 W. Mount Pleasant Ave., 
Livingston, N.J. 07039. 

CAM-I Industrial Automation Stan¬ 
dards Conference & Workshop. Chi¬ 
cago, Sept. 15-18 — Contact: Annette 
Van Hauen, Computer Aided Manufactur¬ 
ing-International, Inc., Suite 1107, 611 
Ryan Plaza Drive, Arlington, Texas 
76011. 

The National Association of Bank 
Servicers’ Annual Meeting. Seattle, 
Sept. 15-18 — Contact: NABS, Suite B, 
5008 Pine Creek Drive, Westerville, Ohio 
43081. 

Workshop on Computer-Assisted 
Map Analysis. Corvallis, Ore., Sept. 

16- 17 — Contact: Joseph K. Berry, 
School of Forestry and Environmental 
Studies, Yale University, 205 Prospect 
St., New Haven, Conn. 06511. Also being 
held Oct. 24-25 in Berkeley, Calif. 

Information Systems Consultants 
Association’s Second Annual Con¬ 
ference and Consultants Market. At¬ 
lanta, Sept. 18-19 — Contact: ISCA, Inc., 
P.O. Box 467190, Atlanta, Ga. 30346. 


SEPT. 20-26 

Interex North American Conference 
of Hewlett-Packard Co. Business 
Computer Users. Las Vegas, Sept. 20- 
25 — Contact: Interex Conference De¬ 
partment, 680 Almanor Ave., Sunnyvale, 
Calif. 94086. 

Management Information Systems 
for Strategic Advantage. Philadel¬ 
phia, Sept. 20-25 — Contact: Registrar, 
Office of Executive Education, 200 Vance 
Hall, The Wharton School, University of 
Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pa. 19104. 

Systems Integration in Multivendor 
Environments: Dataquest, Inc.’s 
Business and Office Systems Con¬ 
ference. Littleton, Mass., Sept. 21-22 

— Contact: Dataquest, 1290 Ridder Park 
Drive, San Jose, Calif. 95131. 

Integrated Services Digital Net¬ 
works. San Francisco, Sept. 21-22 — 
Contact: Customer Service, Frost & Sulli¬ 
van, Inc. 106 Fulton St., New York, N.Y. 
10038. 

CD-ROM Expo. New York, Sept. 21-23 

— Contact: IDG Conference Manage¬ 
ment Group, 375 Cochituate Road, Box 
9171, Framingham, Mass. 01701. 

Corpcon Corporate Microcomputer 
Exposition and Technical Confer¬ 
ence. Los Angeles, Sept. 21-23 — Con¬ 
tact: Corporate Expositions, Inc., P.O. 
Box 3727, Santa Monica, Calif. 90403. 

Office Technologies Conference. 

Los Angeles, Sept. 21-23 — Contact: 
Corporate Expositions, Inc., P.O. Box 
3727, Santa Monica, Calif. 90403. 

Engineering Workstations Confer- 

Continued on page 70 


COMPUTERWORLD 


67 























































MANAGEMENT 





This Swedish banking customer can buy stock at his local branch. 


Swedish MIS 

FROM PAGE 63 

Banken, or S.E. Banken — the 
largest bank in Sweden — the 
deposit of your salary could, if 
you wished, trigger a series of 
transactions. 

First, funds from your per¬ 
sonal checking account could be 
transferred immediately into a 
family account that both you and 
your spouse could access. Sec¬ 
ond, a certain percentage of 
those funds could once again be 
automatically transferred to a 
separate “budgeting” account 
from which bills could be paid. 

But you wouldn’t need to pay 
your bills by writing individual 
checks. A third transaction, trig¬ 
gered by the arrival of funds in 
the budgeting account and the 
date, would transfer budgeting 
funds to your mortgage, car loan 
or utility creditors. The only 
payments you would need to 
make manually would be those 
that you didn’t expect. 

S.E. Banken provides these 
services for individuals along 
with a slew of commercial ser¬ 
vices for its business clients — 
everything from small business 
cash management programs to 
foreign exchange. The institu¬ 
tion is one of the 15 largest 
banks in the world in foreign ex¬ 
change. From its 360 branches, 
it serves 1.3 million customers, 
almost one-sixth of Sweden’s 8.3 
million citizens. 

DP on its own 

What is unusual about S.E. Ban¬ 
ken is not just its level of custom¬ 
er services, compared with 
American standards, but that it 
recently set up its DP depart¬ 
ment as an independent business 
unit. 

SEB Data, as the unit is 
called, is managed strictly as a 
commercial profit center for the 
bank. What this means, says SEB 
Data’s Chief Executive Officer 


Thomas Gluck, is that S.E. Ban¬ 
ken is committed to using tech¬ 
nology to automate bank func¬ 
tions — in part to cut down on 
labor costs, but also to attract 
customers with creative ser¬ 
vices such as direct payments. It 
is seeking to sell applications to 
other banks as well. 

But what fuels SEB Data’s 
competitive management spirit? 
According to Gluck, there is one 
simple drive behind every move 
that Swedish bankers make, and 
that is a very sensitive approach 
to costs. “Sweden is a cost-in¬ 
tensive society,” he says. “La¬ 
bor is expensive in Sweden. It 
makes a difference to us if we can 
run a branch with 10 people in¬ 
stead of 40. Taxes are high. This 
means that in order to offer any¬ 
thing to our people, bankers are 
forced to improve cost efficien¬ 
cy.” 

Gluck adds that while there is 
a very strong competitive drive 
in Sweden, there is also a great 
interest in cooperation where it 


can increase the sophistication of 
services. 

For instance, Swedish banks 
cooperate in a check truncation 
system that allows any customer 
to cash a check in any bank, re¬ 
gardless of whether his account 
is with another bank. 

Mother of invention 

“We do that for cost-efficiency 
reasons,” Gluck says. “Other¬ 
wise, we would have to open so 
many more branches to handle 
our customers, [and] we can’t af¬ 
ford it.” The goal, he claims, is to 
keep building new levels of com¬ 
petition on these layers of coop¬ 
eration. 

But SEB Data is not relying 
solely on its relationship with 
S.E. Banken for its revenue. Not 
only are SEB Data managers 
constantly looking for additional 
revenue-producing services to 
offer old and new banking cus¬ 
tomers, they also aim to become 
a supplier of vertical-market 
banking applications. They are 


actively courting banks in Scan¬ 
dinavia, Europe and even the 
U.S. that might be interested in 
buying their proprietary sys¬ 
tems. 

To do this, the SEB Data 
managers set up a joint venture 
with Enator AB, a large high- 
tech consulting firm in Stock¬ 
holm. SEB Data provides the ap- 


W HAT IS un¬ 
usual about 
S.E. Banken 
is not just its level of 
customer services but 
that it recently set up 
its DP department as 
an independent busi¬ 
ness unit. 


plications and know-how; the 
new venture, named Senator 
AB, provides the systems, con¬ 
sulting and maintenance. 

In effect, the SEB Data man¬ 
agement team is reselling the 
proprietary software that helped 
the firm become the largest 
banking group in Scandinavia. 
However, it has brought in a 
partner to help handle the sales, 
setup, consulting and mainte¬ 
nance, so it doesn’t have to de¬ 
velop its own support structure. 

Looks out for No. 1 

SEB Data keeps its primary cli¬ 
ent competitive with a central¬ 
ized system consisting of three 
IBM 3090s, IBM Systems Net¬ 
work Architecture (SNA) net¬ 
works and proprietary custom- 
designed software. 

The bank’s branch office net¬ 
work is based on IBM 4700 fi¬ 
nancial products. Through SNA 
connections, almost 6,000 IBM 
3270 terminals communicate 
with host systems located in 
Stockholm. Every terminal can 
reach every system. There is no 
distributed processing. 


There are four cornerstones 
to the SEB Data information sys¬ 
tem strategy, according to An¬ 
ders Lindqvist, managing direc¬ 
tor of Senator AB. 

First, SEB Data provides its 
S.E. Banken customers with a 
real-time operating environ¬ 
ment. “The world is real-time,” 
Lindqvist says, “therefore, all 
systems should be real-time.” 

S.E. Banken set the real-time 
goal in 1972. Now it is possibile, 
for example, for a customer to 
walk into any office, ask a teller 
the current price of a certain 
stock and, based on that informa¬ 
tion, place an order that can be 
confirmed on the spot. 

This is possible because the 
central system keeps up-to-the 
minute quotes on share prices 
and because customer transac¬ 
tions are also updated in real¬ 
time. 

Share alike 

In addition, SEB Data maintains 
a common data resource for its 
banking system. “All informa¬ 
tion should be accessible to any¬ 
one and any application in the to¬ 
tal system,” Lindqvist says. S.E. 
Banken went with a centralized 
system, he claims, because it still 
has not found the technology 
that will allow it “to truly share 
all data within a distributed sys¬ 
tem.” The data center system, 
therefore, is based on IMS and 
DL/I, with all files centrally lo¬ 
cated. 

“There is no local intelligence 
whatsoever,” Lindqvist asserts. 
“We have an integrated system 
with a common data resource 
that operates in real-time — 
there is no update afterward.” 

SEB Data’s third goal is to en¬ 
sure that all applications are able 
to communicate with one anoth¬ 
er — application to application. 
In other words, everything that 
can be automated should be 
automated. Currently, 60% to 
70% of all transactions done in 
the bank are never touched by 
human hands. 

To help banking officials 
make quick decisions, SEB Da¬ 
ta’s fourth strategy is to keep 
production and management in¬ 
formation systems data apart. 
The reason: The information 
needed for executive decision 
making is not common data but 
extracts taken from the produc¬ 
tion data — aggregates and the 
like. 

Gluck says the company’s 
management has concluded that 
it should take on the challenge of 
promoting use of the system by 
others. 

“I spent a couple of days in 
Rome, in Paris, in the U.S., and I 
met many banking people,” he 
says. “If they can understand the 
potential of our system, they will 
invest in our system rather than 
developing their own, but what 
we have to learn is how to mar¬ 
ket it.” 


Fiderio is a Computerworld senior edi¬ 
tor. 


Betting on exports 


H "W" "W - "T" e import micro technology 
» M / from you, now we would like to 
M/w/ export macro technology back 
■ V to you — applications,” says 
1 I Thomas Gluck, chief executive 
officer of SEB Data, the MIS arm of Swedish 
banking giant Skandinaviska Enskilda Banken, 
better known as S. E. Banken. 

IBM, Digital Equipment Corp., Honeywell 
Bull, Inc., Prime Computer, Inc. and other U.S. 
vendors may be big providers of technology to 
Sweden, but Swedish companies are betting 
that they have something to offer back to the 
U.S. and to the rest of Europe. 

In fact, Sweden has a growing high-tech 
presence. Not only is it the home of Asea AB, 
one of the largest robotics manufacturers in the 
world, but 10% of the world’s industrial robots 
are installed in Swedish manufacturing facili¬ 
ties, according to the Stockholm Information 
Service. 


Sweden exports roughly half of its manufac¬ 
tured goods and, of that, no less than 46% con¬ 
sist of engineering products, according to S. E. 
Banken. Currently, the segments of the engi¬ 
neering markets that have grown the most dra¬ 
matically are information-intensive areas such 
as communications and electronics. The sup¬ 
port industries for these markets have also 
grown dramatically. 

Sweden, in fact, harbors a growing number 
of computer and telecommunications firms. 
Perhaps the best known is the $4.6 billion-a- 
year Ericsson Group, which designs and manu¬ 
factures private branch exchanges and other 
telecommunications equipment and is nurturing 
a struggling Information Systems division. 

Many of the Swedish computer industry ven¬ 
dors are known for hardware that reflects close 
attention to ergonomic design and for software 
with elegant human interfaces. 

JANET FIDERIO 


68 


COMPUTERWORLD 


AUGUST 10,1987 
























MANAGEMENT 



“The country’s top 
modeling agency 
uses me everyday” 

Dick Pick 




Guide 

CONTINUED FROM PAGE 63 

people who are trying to put together a 
CIM program. 

We are also trying to reinforce two 
other areas that grew up in the last four 
years. One of these is automating the end 
user. That encompasses office automa¬ 
tion and business graphics and that sort of 
thing. 

The third area is telecommunications. 
We have not yet crossed over the bridge 
where we are attracting enough telecom¬ 
munications experts, such as telecom 
managers. We are getting some, but we 
are not getting as many as we would like. 

Do many Rolm Corp. users attend 
Guide meetings? 

Rolm users only come if they meet the 
Guide membership requirements. How¬ 
ever, at this meeting we had the president 
of the National Rolm Users Group here 
for the first three days. Typically, what 
happens is the telecommunications man¬ 
ager goes to the Rolm users group, and 
the data processing manager goes to the 
Guide users group. We are trying to cause 
that to come together a little bit. We are 
considering having a joint meeting in Chi¬ 
cago in July of next year. 

With regard to CIM, do you per¬ 
ceive IBM making a strategic 
thrust into this field? 

Oh, yes. I think there’s a big emphasis on 
the manufacturing end of the business on 
the part of IBM. They are really behind 
most other companies in shop-floor tech¬ 
nology. It’s going to be hard to judge 
whether or not they’re going to be suc¬ 
cessful. 


Is there much discussion about the 
Personal System/2, particularly 
since there is the perception that 
it is a machine for MIS? 

We’re typically a little slow in reaction to 
new product introductions. We will hear 
an awful lot from individual members, but 
the organization hasn’t yet really focused 
on them. In general, I would say that it’s a 
good offering. It’s an attempt to put an in¬ 
telligent workstation on a network. But 
until we get some population of PS/2s and 
some hands-on experience with them, 
there won’t be a focal point at Guide 
where we can get together and say what’s 
good and bad about them. 

Is the same true for 9370s? 

Yes. There’s a lot of talk about 9370s but 
nothing really solid. Our users like to hear 
stories about people who have PS/2s and 
9370s, not just that someone plans to get 
one. That won’t even buy you a drink. 
Maybe next year we will hear more. 

At every Guide meeting, the 
group submits a list of “require¬ 
ments” to IBM. What major re¬ 
quirements have kept coming up? 

One of them has been a common architec¬ 
ture across IBM’s product line. IBM an¬ 
nounced Systems Application Architec¬ 
ture, which was in answer to what was, in 
one form or another, a requirement for 
the last 10 years. 

Would you also consider the 
9370, which is extending the 370 
architecture to the mid-range, an 
answer to your requirements? 

I suppose so, but we have not had any top 


10 requirement in the last 10 years that 
had to do with IBM’s hardware — that it 
be faster, smaller or whatever. We have 
been reasonably satisfied with their hard¬ 
ware. 

We’re after better management tools 
to manage the hardware; better software 
tools, so it can be used more quickly and 
better. We have a major effort in applica¬ 
tions development productivity. That has 
been one of the top 10 requirements for 
the last 14 years. And we are emphasizing 
it again this year. 

What do you think about the Solu- 
tionpac concept — putting to¬ 
gether software packages for 
specific vertical markets? 

The Solutionpac concept is a good con¬ 


cept. I’m not sure how successful it’s go¬ 
ing to be. But I believe there are a large 
number of small to mid-range computer 
installations where Solutionpacs could be 
a good answer to reducing application de¬ 
velopment problems. 

Another thing IBM is emphasizing 
on the software side is DB2, isn’t 
it? 

DB2 is one of the very active projects that 
we have. There is a lot of interest and a lot 
of energy going into DB2; in how to tune 
it and how to better understand what its 
requirements are for higher speeds. We 
don’t have any reliable statistics about the 
use of DB2 among our members, but my 
sense is that there is a real groundswell of 
usage. 


Guide is planning a major sympo¬ 
sium in San Francisco in Septem¬ 
ber. What do you hope to accom¬ 
plish there? 

We are inviting a large number of well- 
known speakers in order to attract mem¬ 
bers of the boards of directors of other us¬ 
ers groups throughout the world. 

That is the public part of the meeting. 
But there is a private part that will go on 
afterward. 

To my knowledge, this is the first time 
we will have brought together all the 
worldwide users groups in one place. 
There is no hidden agenda there. We are 
just trying to get users together to ex¬ 
change ideas. We will talk about how to 
better manage users groups to get the 
most out of them. 


Copyright © Pick Systems, 1987. “PICK" and “Pick Systems" are registered trademarks of Pick Systems. 


When the Ford modeling 
agency needs to know, in a 
moment’s time, where any one 
of a thousand models will be 
a week from next Tuesday: or 
do bookings, model payroll or 
general ledger, they need the 
world’s fastest data base 
management environment. 
They need Pick.® 

Thousands of companies 
have discovered that rick is 
the one operating system capa¬ 
ble of managing a complex 


and interrelated data base. 

With Pick, you won’t have 
to redo your application soft¬ 
ware if you want to expand to 
a mini or mainframe. Because 
Pick is machine independent. 
Which means that your data 
and applications are transport¬ 
able from one Pick-based 
system to another. 

Even if you have a single 
PC-AT, Pick allows you to 
create a genuine multi-user 
environment,which eliminates 


the need for cumbersome and 
inefficient networking 
solutions. So you save time. 
And money. 

That’s one of the reasons 
why Ford Models thinks 
Dick Pick is beautiful. 

For more information call 
1-800-FOR-PICK today In 
California, call (714) 261-7425. 

PICK 

SYSTEMS 


AUGUST 10,1987 


COMPUTERWORLD 


69 
















MANAGEMENT 


Stop the buck 

CONTINUED FROM PAGE 63 

pair of landslide presidential victories. 

His management style was often praised 
as he appeared likely to become the first 
president since Dwight D. Eisenhower to 
successfully serve two full terms. 

In particular, Reagan’s style was con¬ 
trasted with that of his immediate prede¬ 
cessor, Jimmy Carter, a president whose 
immersion in the details of White House 
doings (including the schedule for the 
tennis court, critics were fond of noting) 
was often attributed in part to his train¬ 
ing as an engineer. 

Observers of the White House scene 
have noted that Reagan's “Look, no 


hands” management style served him 
well during his first term, when he en¬ 
joyed the services of three loyal, dispas¬ 
sionate top aides of the sort necessary to 
succeed with such a management ap¬ 
proach. James A. Baker III, Edwin Meese 
III and Michael K. Deaver all met with 
the president frequently and often pre¬ 
sented him with opposing views on ma¬ 
jor issues. 

But observers like former Sen. Paul 
Laxalt (R-Nev.), a close friend of Reagan, 
and Brent Scowcroft, a Ford administra¬ 
tion national security adviser and a mem¬ 
ber of the Tower commission that inves¬ 
tigated the Iran-Contra affair, have said in 
interviews with The New York Times 
that the system broke down when the 
three aides left the White House after 


Reagan’s first term and their counsel was 
replaced by one voice: that of Chief of 
Staff Donald T. Regan, who they said 
sometimes shielded the president from 
opposing points of view. 

Management guru and Claremont 
Graduate School professor Peter F. 
Drucker concurs with this view. “The 
first job of a chief of staff is to make sure 
that the chief executive officer gets all 
dissents, conflicting points of view and al¬ 
ternatives,” Drucker wrote in com¬ 
menting on the Iran scandal in The Wall 
Street Journal earlier this year. He un¬ 
derlined the need for a chief of staff to be 
independent of the competing interests 
that he is supposed to relate to his boss. 

Drucker also underscored the need 
for the chief executive to clearly define 


Nixdorf tames 
the data entry tiger. 



T here was a time when it was 
enough just to be able to capture 
data. Now, the premium is on speed, 
flexibility and easy maintainability. 

The faster and more accurately 
you can capture data, the faster it 
can be put to use by corporate 
management. 

But capturing data exclusively from 
a huge centralized host system has 
become an expensive and unaccept¬ 
ably slow process. And it’s getting 
harder and harder to find new ways 
to skin the cat. Especially if the cat’s 
a big one, and it decides to resist. 

Nixdorf’s answer to the problem is 
to reduce the size of the tiger: we 
can help you complement your host 
systems with one or more subsidiary 


distributed systems. By breaking the 
problem down into manageable 
parts, Nixdorf’s system permits 
departmental data capture, which 
makes you faster and more valuable 
to management. 

Our distributed systems come in 
all sizes, from a tabletop version to a 
supermini, and drastically reduce the 
cost of providing high-level informa¬ 
tion, saving more than enough to 
justify the expense of installation. 

Nixdorf is used to taming big prob¬ 
lems. We are a $2 billion-plus corpo¬ 
ration with nearly 26,000 employees 
in over 600 offices in 44 countries 
worldwide. We have more than 100 
sales and service locations through¬ 
out the U.S. and Canada alone. 


So, if you have a data entry tiger 
by the tail, call Nixdorf. 

We’ll show you how to turn him 
into a pussycat. 

Nixdorf Computer Corporation 
300 Third Avenue 
Waltham, MA 02154 
Tel. 1-800-343-4474 


NIXDORF 

COMPUTER 


delegated tasks in terms of scope, mea¬ 
sure of results and method of reporting 
and to carefully monitor progress or lack 
thereof, citing Franklin D. Roosevelt as 
the greatest delegator in recent Ameri¬ 
can history. 

Similarly, Scowcroft cited a need for 
an executive delegating duties to main¬ 
tain an inquiring style, which Reagan 
lacked and which became conspicuous 
when top aides no longer volunteered a 
variety of views on issues. 

So the Iran-Contra imbroglio points 
not to the virtues or vices of particular 
management styles, which may be more 
or less appropriate for different individ¬ 
uals and situations. Rather, it under¬ 
scores the need for effective implementa¬ 
tion of a given style, incorporating the 
necessary elements that the style as¬ 
sumes or whose need has been demon¬ 
strated by experience. 

It’s a telling illustration of the need — 
on the part of both executives and subor¬ 
dinates — for effective interpersonal 
skills of the sort that aspiring business 
people, particularly those with technical 
backgrounds, are constantly being urged 
to develop. 

The executive must encourage and 
accommodate subordinates’ expressions 
of conflicting points of view. He also 
must effectively communicate delegated 
tasks and then maintain control over 
them while not getting in the way. 

In perhaps a greater challenge, sub¬ 
ordinates should be willing to test the 
boss’s willingness to hear conflicting ad¬ 
vice and must communicate the progress, 
and any problems, with delegated tasks 
before they become the talk of the town 
— or worse. 


Ludlum is Computerworld's senior editor, man¬ 
agement. 


Continued from page 67 
ence. Los Angeles, Sept. 21-23. Con¬ 
tact: Corporate Expositions, Inc., P.O. 
Box 3727, Santa Monica, Calif. 90403. 

CSM ’87: Conference on Software 
Maintenance. Austin, Texas, Sept. 21- 
24 — Contact: The Computer Society of 
the Institute of Electrical and Electronics 
Engineers, 1730 Massachusetts Ave. 
N.W., Washington, D.C. 20036. 

10th National Computer Security 
Conference. Baltimore, Sept. 21-24 — 
Contact: Linda Muzik, Attn: C421, Na¬ 
tional Computer Security Center, 9800 
Savage Road, Fort George G. Meade, 
Md. 20755. 

Ninth Annual Satellite Communica¬ 
tions Users Conference. Dallas, Sept. 
22-24 — Contact: SCUC ’87 Satellite 
Communications Magazine, Suite 650, 
6300 S. Syracuse Way, Englewood, Colo. 
80111. 

5th Annual 1100 Data Center Man¬ 
agement Conference. San Diego, 
Sept. 22-25 — Contact: Datametrics 
Systems Corp., 5270 Lyngate Court, 
Burke, Va. 22015. 


Fifth Annual NCR Users Eastern 
America Conference. Fort Washing¬ 
ton, Pa., Sept. 24-25 — Contact: Frank 
Whalon, c/o Tinius Olsen Testing Ma¬ 
chine Co., P.O. Box 429, Willow Grove, 
Pa. 19090. 


70 


COMPUTERWORLD 


AUGUST 10,1987 



































COMPUTER INDUSTRY 


INDUSTRY 


INSIGHT 



Clinton Wilder 


Rumor mill 
grinds on 

“Control Data Corp. stock 
soars on rumors of an offer for 
the firm or a leveraged buy¬ 
out.” 

“NEC Corp. stock plum¬ 
mets on Japanese newspaper re¬ 
port that it may be investigated 
for illegal technology exports.” 

“IBM shares drop as sec¬ 
ond-quarter earnings fall short of 
analysts’ estimates, which 
were raised in the last few days 
on rumors of higher profits.” 

Welcome to Wall Street, 

1987 — one of the worst places 
to go for reliable information 
about developments in the com¬ 
puter industry. The above 
three news items from recent 
weeks illustrate the enigmatic 
relationship between stock mar¬ 
ket activity and reality. 

Market gyrations based on 
rumor and hearsay are as old as 
Daddy Warbucks’ paper stock 
ticker. And the follow-the-crowd 
mentality of investors certainly 
dates back to the Crash of 1929. 

But this year, the computer 
industry seems particularly sus¬ 
ceptible to such rumors, for a 
variety of reasons. 

Oscillating moods 

First and foremost, high-tech 
investors are in that most unpre¬ 
dictable of moods: They are 
nervous. Having suffered 
through the industry downturn 
of 1985 and 1986, they are un¬ 
derstandably skeptical about 
boom computer stocks. And they 
have been badly burned by a 
number of companies, such as 
Daisy Systems Corp. and Float¬ 
ing Point Systems, Inc., whose 
rosy pictures of financial health 
had some hidden, and very dark, 
clouds. 

Earlier this year, riding a 
raging bull market combined 
with high tech’s own recovery, 
investors went on a small buying 
binge that boosted the share 
prices of a wide range of ven¬ 
dors’ stocks. Although the mar¬ 
ket surge was real, it made some 
people skittish — ready to cash 
in their profits and move to 
greener pastures at the first 

Continued on page 74 


New blood pumps TRW service 


BY ALAN ALPER 

CW STAFF 


FAIRFIELD, N.J. — As tumul¬ 
tuous as the computer mainte¬ 
nance business has been recent¬ 
ly, it is a wonder that an outsider 
would be willing to enter the 
fray. But Paul Snyder, the re¬ 
cently appointed vice-president 
and general manager of TRW, 
Inc.’s Customer Service Divi¬ 
sion, seems generally unper¬ 
turbed. 

Snyder, an affable, 49-year- 
old executive, recently succeed¬ 
ed longtime division head May¬ 
nard Smith, who retired earlier 
this year. Snyder, an 11-year 
TRW veteran, most recently 
headed the firm’s Electronic As¬ 
semblies Division. 

Snyder seeks to build on the 
Customer Service Division’s 
equipment reconditioning and 
servicing strengths while ex¬ 
panding into software mainte¬ 
nance, consulting and remote di¬ 
agnostics services. The TRW 
division and Bell Atlantic Corp.’s 
Sorbus unit are the industry’s 
largest providers of third-party 
computer maintenance. 

“We’ve been fixing hardware 
as opposed to fixing customers,” 
Snyder says. “Our business has 
moved to become one of asset 
management for our custom¬ 
ers.” 

Because of the heavy capital 
investment its customers have 
made in hardware and software, 
asset management means mak¬ 
ing sure customers’ equipment 
is up and running nearly 100% of 
the time. Anticipating problems 


through remote diagnostics 
linked to customers’ equipment 
via modems is a service TRW 
will continue to evolve, Snyder 
says. 

The division also hopes to 
beef up its presence in IBM pro¬ 
cessor maintenance and its ser¬ 
vicing of products sold through 
resellers, he notes. IBM’s recent 
Customer Service Amendment 
(CSA) overhaul, effective June 1, 
gave customers 24-hour, seven- 
day-a-week service and a variety 
of discounts and will make IBM a 
tougher competitor, analysts 
say. 

TRW is responding with a 


program called Service Plus, of¬ 
fering reductions of 10% to 20% 
on maintenance charges, a price 
guarantee of two years and 24- 
hour, seven-day-a-week service 
at no extra charge. 

Snyder says he believes 
IBM’s CSA program is purely a 
discounting ploy and that little 
else, in terms of quality of ser¬ 
vice, has changed. While ac¬ 
knowledging the importance of 
price, Snyder fervently says that 
response time and quality of ser¬ 
vice are just as important. 

“The building of a partner¬ 
ship is important,” he states. 

Continued on page 74 


TRW, Sorbus lead top five 

Estimated 1986 revenue of leading U.S. third-party maintenance 
Providers 


Independent 
computer 
maintenance 
industry total 


$190M 

$ 190M 



$ 110M 


TRW Customer 1 
Service Division' 

Sorbus, Inct^x^ 

Intelogic Trace, Inc7\ 

General Electric Co. and RCA Corp> 


Control Data Corp>\ 


INFORMATION PROVIDED BY BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT INTERNATIONAL 

CW CHART: MITCHELL J. HAYES 


Industry 
battling 
parts tariff 


BY MITCH BETTS 

CW STAFF 


WASHINGTON, D.C. — The 
computer industry is waging a 
battle against a U.S. Customs 
Service ruling that classifies 
printed-circuit boards containing 
a CPU as “data processing ma¬ 
chines,” which are subject to im¬ 
port tariffs as high as 100%. 

As a practical matter, the re¬ 
cent Customs Service ruling cat¬ 
egorizes a CPU board as an inde¬ 
pendent computer rather than a 
computer part. The distinction is 
important because tariffs on 
computer parts from Canada and 
Japan were eliminated by a 1985 
trade agreement, while tariffs on 
independent computers are still 
enforced. 

The import tariff on comput¬ 
ers is generally a modest 4.3%, 
but 16-bit microprocessors im¬ 
ported from Japan are slapped 
with 100% punitive tariffs as a 
Continued on page 73 

Inside 

• Televideo to acquire Zen- 
tec for $30.8M. Page 72. 

• Motorola settles French 
breach of agreement suit out 
of court. Page 72. 

• Tandon President Wilkie 
relinquishes title to firm’s 
founder. Page 73. 


Intellicorp seeks commercial markets 

Will port AI software to Sun, DEC, Apollo systems; cuts staff by 10% 


BY STEPHEN JONES 

CW STAFF 


MOUNTAIN VIEW, Calif. — 
Caught in the throes of a sluggish 
artificial intelligence market, In¬ 
tellicorp, Inc. is trying to tap a 
broader list of customers by 
porting its AI development soft¬ 
ware from Symbolics, Inc.’s 
LISP computers to conventional 
hardware from companies such 
as Sun Microsystems, Inc., Digi¬ 
tal Equipment Corp. and Apollo 
Computer, Inc. 

To make the transition, Intel¬ 
licorp has shaken up its staff of 
200, laying off about 20 and 
moving some high-level employ¬ 
ees from research and develop¬ 
ment positions to marketing 
jobs. The company is also start¬ 
ing a vertical marketing push in 


an effort to cozy up to Fortune 
1,000 end users. 

“This is an opportunity to 
structure the company for prof¬ 
itability by simply trying to reach 
for larger markets for our soft¬ 
ware,” said Thomas Kehler, 
chairman and chief executive of¬ 
ficer of Intellicorp. 

In the past, Intellicorp’s 
Knowledge Engineering Envi¬ 
ronment system, which helps us¬ 
ers with little programming ex¬ 
perience develop knowledge- 
based systems, has run only on 
unconventional LISP computers 
from Concord, Mass.-based 
Symbolics. That powerful hard¬ 
ware was needed to handle the 
many tasks associated with AI, 
but it failed to attract a large 
group of customers. 

Platforms from companies 


like DEC and Sun, meanwhile, 
have reached the power and per¬ 
formance levels needed to devel¬ 
op knowledge-based systems. 
With those machines accepted as 
standards in the general-busi¬ 
ness workstation market, indus¬ 
try analysts agree that portabil¬ 
ity is the key to the success of AI 
software. 

“If Intellicorp is going to be 
successful, it’s going to have to 
bridge into the real world,” said 
Charlotte Walker, a senior vice- 
president with L. F. Rothschild, 
Unterberg Towbin. “It has to 
get out of the R&D shop and into 
the commercial marketplace.” 

Though the strategy may pay 
off in upcoming quarters, Intelli¬ 
corp’s sagging bottom line is ex¬ 
pected to take a big hit for the 
year ended June 30. Flat reve¬ 


nue and a series of one-time 
charges from the new plan — in¬ 
cluding about $1 million in write¬ 
offs for scrapped LISP comput¬ 
ers — will result in a loss of up to 
$4 million on sales of about $22 
million for the year, Walker said. 

Sales for the fourth quarter, 
which Intellicorp is expected to 
report on today, will be about $6 
million with a loss of $2 million, 
Walker estimated. 

Sample applications 

Instead of selling primarily to 
LISP developers that are inter¬ 
ested in experimental R&D 
work, Intellicorp said it plans to 
target developers that want to 
write programs for general-pur¬ 
pose commercial markets on 
conventional hardware. Such ap¬ 
plications include systems that 
help run computer-integrated 
manufacturing and programs 
that diagnose and repair tele¬ 
communication systems. 

Continued on page 72 


AUGUST 10,1987 


COMPUTERWORLD 


71 



















































COMPUTERINDUSTRY 


Televideo to acquire Zentec for $30.8 million 

Purchaser achieves long-time quest, hopes for revival of OEM business 


BY JULIE PITTA 

CW STAFF 


SUNNYVALE, Calif. — Televideo Sys¬ 
tems, Inc. said last week it had signed a 
letter of intent to acquire fellow terminal 
maker Zentec Corp. in Santa Clara, Calif., 
for approximately $30.8 million in cash 
and stocks. 

Under the proposal, Televideo will ex¬ 
change 8.7 million shares of newly issued 
stock for all outstanding shares of Zentec 
stock. The merged company will retain 
the Televideo name. Additionally, Televi¬ 


deo will acquire all outstanding shares of 
Zentec preferred stock for $9 million in 
cash. 

Zentec’s base of OEM business proved 
attractive to Televideo, which has been 
frustrated in its attempts to penetrate 
that market. “We definitely need that 
OEM business,” explained Robert Shef¬ 
field, Televideo financial vice-president. 
“And their terminals offer a lot of emula¬ 
tions we don’t have. They bring to us a lit¬ 
tle different technology. ’ ’ 

About 70% of Zentec’s $27 million in 
revenue last year was the result of OEM 


sales. Televideo’s OEM business has 
been virtually nonexistent, and the com¬ 
pany has suffered from flat sales in recent 
months. For the quarter ended May 1, 
Televideo reported earnings of $341,000 
on sales of $21 million. 

Subject to shareholders’ approval 

Sheffield said the merger is expected to 
be finalized before the completion of the 
fiscal year, which ends Oct. 31. It must be 
approved by the shareholders and boards 
of both companies. 

Production of Zentec’s line of display 


terminals eventually will be transferred 
from its leased plant in Mexicali, Mexico, 
to Televideo’s wholly owned production 
plant in Korea, Sheffield said. However, a 
schedule for that transition has not been 
set. 

K. Philip Hwang, Televideo’s chair¬ 
man and chief executive officer, will be 
chairman of the merged entity, while Zen¬ 
tec President William Parker will become 
president. No chief executive officer will 
be named, Sheffield said. 

Cash-rich Televideo, with about $65 
million in reserves, has been seeking an 
acquisition for more than a year. Its pro¬ 
posed acquisition of Alpha Microsystems, 
Inc. last year fell by the wayside after a 
letter of intent was signed [CW, Oct. 27, 
1986]. 

Motorola settles 
technology suit 

PARIS — Semiconductor maker Motor¬ 
ola, Inc. recently said it has settled a 
breach of agreement suit filed by the 
Thomson-CSF division of French defense 
and electronics company Thomson SA 
earlier this year. 

Thomson had sought damages of about 
$525 million. The financial terms of the 
out-of-court settlement were not dis¬ 
closed. 

Filing in the Tribunal of Commerce in 
Paris Feb. 2, Thomson alleged that Mo¬ 
torola had “anticipatorially” breached a 
technology transfer agreement relating 
to Motorola’s 16- and 32-bit micro¬ 
processors. 

Under terms of the out-of-court agree¬ 
ment, Motorola is expected to transfer 
certain technology to Thomson-CSF in 
exchange for payment from Motorola. 

After that technology transfer is com¬ 
pleted, Thomson will reportedly dismiss 
the suit. 


Intellicorp 

CONTINUED FROM PAGE 71 

Intellicorp has started shipping devel¬ 
opment programs that run on the DEC 
Vaxstation and the Sun 3. That has helped 
the firm win over customers such as Mc¬ 
Donnell Douglas Corp. in St. Louis, which 
has reportedly purchased 30 of Intelli- 
corp’s Knowledge Engineering Environ¬ 
ment systems to run on Sun workstations. 

Intellicorp expects to announce similar 
products for the Apollo DN300 and 570 
series this quarter and for the IBM RT 
Personal Computer next year, said Lisa 
Sheeran, an Intellicorp spokeswoman. 

While Intellicorp CEO Kehler empha¬ 
sized that LISP users will not be aban¬ 
doned, he said that within a year, software 
for Sun and DEC machines should make 
up 75% of sales. 

William Higgs, director of software re¬ 
search for Cupertino, Calif.-based Info- 
corp, said waning customer interest in the 
AI industry is forcing firms such as Intelli¬ 
corp and Teknowledge, Inc. to make the 
move to mainstream applications. 

“Most companies in the AI industry 
haven’t experienced the growth they an¬ 
ticipated,” Higgs said. “Emphasizing the 
practical elements of AI and its practical 
payoff is the first necessary step toward 
success.” 


The easy way to network terminals, minicomputers, and PCs. 

Introducing an 
incredible data B\BX 






hcelmL 

/■8C0 MCONrUS 


The channeb are as low as $6.50 
per month, but you can get your questions 
answered for free. Call the MICOM Hotline 
for more info or applications assbtance. 


MICOM Systems, Inc., 4100 Los Angeles Avenue, 

Simi Valley, CA 93062-8100. Europe: UK-(44) (635) 832441, 
Inti: USA-(01) (805) 583-8600. 

"MICOM" and "INSTANET6000"' 


Now MICOM 
offers a no risk way to 
expand access to your com¬ 
puter system. 

The INSTANET6000 Series 20 is a 
little data PABX with lots of capa¬ 
bility, designed into a bookshelf 
sized enclosure. And you can 
rent it for as low as $6.50 per 
channel per month, depending 
on the configuration you choose. 
And when it comps to features, the 
Series 20 is priceless. It's a flexible, easy 
way to interconnect up to 250 computer 
ports and users in a single step. 

There are also easy-to-use menus to guide new 
users through the system. Plus, you won't need to run 
bulky lengths of cable between the Series 20 and individual 
devices, like terminals and printers. Our Data Distributor 
can be conveniently located near your equipment, using 
only two existing wire pairs. This makes for fast terminal 
connections and eliminates cumbersome RS-232 cable. 

What's more, the Series 20's small size fits into your 
office as comfortably as its low price fits your budget. 

To find out how easy it is to rent and install an 
INSTANET6000 Series 20 data PABX, call us at the 
MICOM applications hotline. 

No one knows more about data PABX than 
MICOM. That's why our customers have already 
bought and installed over 1,000,000 channels. And 
now they can rent from us. And only us. 

Because when it comes to renting data PABX, 
we own the market. 


DATACOMM BY 





More ws/s to help 
computers do more. 


72 


COMPUTERWORLD 


AUGUST 10,1987 
































COMPUTERWORLD 


SPOTLIGHT 


DBMS: MEDIUM 
AND URGE SCALE 







i <Vi'ri u 


as* 


i p mm 


tUaUfr 


Vs T Ny , U. v.f "tiL! 


r£JW,*\»J.V’JWW 


■n yfiot rn .trri’,r - Av^ ■'■ y T w ; */!/. ? 








The search for flexible and nonthreatening data base 
management systems has led to relational technology. The ap¬ 
proach isn’t new, but now the times and the tools are right. 


AUGUST 10,1987 • SPOTLIGHT NO. 17 



































































































When you first look at relational 
DBMS products, the similarities are 
obvious. They’re all built around 
SQL. Most include 4GL tools. They 
all have an impressive range of fea¬ 
tures and functions. And they all 
claim to deliver performance. 

But once you get your hands on 
these products, the differences are 
dramatic. It’s the craftsmanship in 
designing, building, and assembling 
quality components that differenti¬ 
ates a master’s instrument from 
a beginner’s. 

That’s why professionals from 
the world’s most discriminating orga¬ 
nizations are selecting INGRES as 
their instrument of choice. 

And why INGRES was voted 
"Test DBMS/4GL by Digital Review 
for two years running. 

No wonder. INGRES has been 
designed from top to bottom to 
support developers of performance- 
critical applications. 


It offers a superb 4GL environ¬ 
ment that helps you get applications 
running quickly. And makes them 
easy to maintain. Better yet, with 
INGRES/STAR you can orchestrate 
applications across your organization 
including data on mainframes, 
minis, workstations, and PCs. 

To boost performance, INGRES 
uses the industry’s 
most sophisticated 
query optimizer and 
other performance tun¬ 
ing facilities to ensure 
your applications run 
at top speed. 

With this kind of 
performance, INGRES 
attracts a lot of new 
customers. But it’s our 
reliability and sup¬ 
port, that keeps them. 

INGRES delivers such 
a high level of satis¬ 
faction that 99% of 


our customers stay with us, year 
after year. 

The most important thing about 
a DBMS is the way it performs for 
you. And that’s why we’d like you to 
experience INGRES. 

Just send this coupon or call 
us. And we’ll show you what a fine 
instrument INGRES really is. 


r 


Yes, I’d like to see how INGRES performs. Please: 

□ Send me more information about INGRES. 

□ I’d like to attend a free INGRES seminar in my area. 

□ I’d like to know more about the INGRES sampler. 

□ Have a salesperson call me. 

Name_ 

Company_ 

Title_ 

Mailing address_ 

City_ 


107 


1 


State. 


Zip. 


Telephone. 


Mail to: INGRES, 
Relational Technology Inc. 
1080 Marina Village Parkway 
Alameda, CA 94501-9891 
( Or call: 1-800-4-INGRES 

© 1987 Relational Technology Inc. 


FNGRES 

Relational Technology Inc. 


J 






























DBMS 



INSIDE 

Interview 


In a climate of open exchange and 
peaceful collaboration, applications would 
move freely among competing systems. 


Robert Epstein, execu¬ 
tive vice-president and co¬ 
founder of Sybase, Inc., 
talks about the relational 
DBMS marketplace and 
where it’s going. Page S7. 

The Magical Sell 

The relational approach 
doesn’t eliminate the ne¬ 
cessity for good data base 
design: Vendors that 
promise magical results 
do everyone a disservice. 
Page S9. 

Product Face-Off 

IDMS/R and DB2 offer 
users distinctly different 
choices for managing data 
bases. Page SI 2. 

Seeing the Forest 
and the frees 

A DBMS has given the 
Park Service control over 
its far-flung resources. 
Page S14. 

Blind Spot 

Visual interfaces do not 
yet lend themselves to 
easy browsing. Page SI5. 

Vendor Viewpoints 

Data dictionaries have a 
crucial role to play in 
DBMS. Page SI 6. 

A move to DB2 may re¬ 
quire changing your ap¬ 
proach to data access, but 
the net performance im¬ 
provement will justify the 
effort. Page SI7. 

Product Chart 

A detailed guide to mini¬ 
computer and mainframe 
DBMS. Page SI8. 


SENIOR EDITOR 

Joanne Kelleher 

ASSOCIATE EDITOR 

PennyJanzen 

RESEARCHER 

Sally Cusack 

DESIGN EDITOR 

Marjorie Magowan 

ASSISTANT RESEARCHER 

Bonnie MacKeil 


Cover illustration: 
Franklin Hammond 


Copyright 1987 by CW Communica- 
tions/Lnc. All rights reserved. Reproduc¬ 
tion of material appearing in Computer- 
world Spotlight is forbidden without 
written permission. Send all requests to 
Nancy Shannon, CW Communications/ 
Inc., Box 9171, 375 Cochituate Road, 
Framingham, MA 01701-9171. 


THE IMPERATIVE 
OF COEXISTENCE 

BY RICHARD SKRINDE 



TOM HUNT 


P eaceful coexistence is a subject very much on the minds of 
many data base-dependent organizations. Their concerns do 
not have anything to do with armament policies, trade negotia¬ 
tions or relations between the superpowers. It is system com¬ 
patibility, not diplomacy, that is preoccupying users of medi¬ 
um- and large-scale data base management systems technology. 

The task these users are faced with is one of reconciling the present 
with the future. A new generation of relational DBMSs has emerged, 


which promises many benefits — but only if it can 
be successfully linked with existing application 
architecture. Technology coexistence is the term 
being applied to the goal of merging new technol¬ 
ogy into traditional system structures and, like 
global issues of collaboration, the desired end is a 
lot clearer than the necessary means. 

Security Pacific National Bank is an example 
of an organization stationed at the forefront of 
DBMS technology and trying to deal with the is¬ 
sues of technology coexistence. Security Pacific 
has been a traditional IBM IMS hierarchical data 
base shop and has developed many ambitious 
IMS-based applications. 

Its Host Authorization System, for example, 
supports a large network of automated teller ma¬ 
chines and bank card readers that are used to 
check payment authorizations. It was developed 
utilizing IBM’s IMS Fastpath and took advantage 
of every availability and performance feature of 
this development system. Response time is 0.1 
seconds, with hit rates on the system of 15 trans¬ 
actions per second. Bank ATMs have an uptime 
in excess of 99%, including the time the operator 
shuts down the ATM for daily service. 

Another Fastpath application, a bulk filing sys¬ 
tem called Total On-us Processing and Services 
(TOPAS), keeps every transaction for every cus- 


Skrinde is a data base management consultant based in Ala¬ 
meda, Calif. He specializes in fourth-generation language- 
based business applications and practices. 


tomer checking and savings account on-line for 
65 days. Using advanced facilities such as the 
multiple-area concept, TOPAS processes four 
million transactions in less than one hour every 
night. 

In 1985, however, the bank set aside IMS 
products and switched to relational technology 
with IBM’s DB2. This was a major shift for an or¬ 
ganization committed to, and successful with, 
IMS applications. 

Ka-yiu Yu, manager of data base services at 
Security Pacific, says that as far as the bank is 
concerned, relational technology is the progres¬ 
sive path. “DB2 or dedicated relational machines 
like Tandem Computers, Inc.’s Nonstop SQL are 
the future for us. We have completed nine appli¬ 
cations in DB2 and have had such good results 
that we plan to look at DB2 for every new applica¬ 
tion. Right now, we are stress-testing the prod¬ 
uct to see how far you can push it before it quits,” 
he says. 

Making the worlds meet 

For the moment, Security Pacific is maintaining a 
strict separation between the two DBMS envi¬ 
ronments. No relational applications currently 
have to access any of the data in the older IMS ap¬ 
plications. Integration, however, is inevitable. 
“We know that it will only be a matter of time,” 
Yu says, “before we must develop an application 
that will have to access both data bases. It is a dif¬ 
ficult problem, and we are studying the best way 


AUGUST 10,1987 


COMPUTERWORLD 


SI 





























DBMS 



Coexistence 

FROM PREVIOUS PAGE 
to handle it.” 

The effort involved in adopting the 
new technology is substantial, according 
to Yu, but the advantages are even more 
significant. 

‘‘Applications can be developed much 
faster,” he says. ‘‘The cost of mainte¬ 
nance and enhancements is much lower. 
And, most important, relational technol¬ 
ogy will support distributed data bases. 
Transaction processing can be accom¬ 
plished at many sites, rather than having 
to ship all of the data to one central site 
and then attack it with a giant mainframe 
and IMSFastpath.” 

The distributed data base is the ideal 
response to the expansion that has result¬ 
ed from the deregulation of the banking 


Large-scale DBMS software 

1986 market share 

Martin Marietta 
Corp.'s Data 
Systems Division 

4% 

Software AG 
of North America, 

Inc. 5% 

Applied Data 
Research, Inc. 

Cullinet 
Software, Inc. 

INFORMATION PROVIDED BY INTERNATIONAL 
RESOURCE DEVELOPMENT, INC. 

CW CHART 



industry, Yu explains. “ A new node could 
be set up in the system for a new site with¬ 
out having to do major rework on the ap¬ 
plications,” he claims. 

Expanding the skies 

Security Pacific is not alone in its migra¬ 
tion of data base architecture. American 
Airlines maintains one of the largest com¬ 
puter networks in the world. The firm’s 
real-time reservation system supports 
approximately 100,000 terminals and 
processes an average of 1,500 trans¬ 
action/sec., with a three-second response 
time. 

A second real-time system supports 
flight operations. That system is connect¬ 
ed to 20,000 terminals and interfaced to a 
computer on every American Airlines air¬ 
craft to monitor when each plane leaves 
the gates, takes off or lands. These real¬ 
time systems run on IBM 9091 Model 
400 mainframes and are tightly coded in 
Transaction Processing Facility Version 
2 (TPF2), an outcropping of Airline Con¬ 
trol Program. A third system is a large on¬ 
line system called the commercial com¬ 
plex, which supports all corporate 
business and management activities with 
applications built using IMS. 

American Airlines has a two-stage plan 
for technology coexistence. For the first 
stage, the company has developed hard¬ 
ware and software linkages between its 
on-line and real-time systems. 

These linkages have greatly enhanced 
the airline’s ability to manage the infor¬ 
mation stored in its two massive real-time 
systems. For example, an agent enters all 
of the tickets collected for a particular 
flight into the real-time system. An IMS- 
based application in the commercial com¬ 
plex extracts this information from the 
real-time application that has been writ¬ 
ten in TPF2. This information is then col¬ 


lated by the IMS application to provide 
American Airlines management with 
same-day information about the total 
number of people flying in and out of that 
airport, as well as all other airports, via a 
trend line and other reporting formats. 

The second stage is to incorporate an 
aggressive development program that 
will connect a large relational data base 
system to the on-line system. That link¬ 
age will allow a manager to access the 
IMS with a relational query, such as, 
“How many people flew from New York 
to Boston between noon and 6 p.m. to¬ 
day?” The manager would not need to un¬ 
derstand much about computers and 
could get the information immediately by 
using a format that could be transferred 
directly into his word processing or 


spreadsheet package. 

American Airline’s goal is to put the 
tools for managing the critical informa¬ 
tion contained in the on-line system di¬ 
rectly in the hands of managers rather 
than have them make requests for reports 
through the DP department. 

Joyce Wren, assistant vice-president 
for American Airline’s Data and Applica¬ 
tion Services, says, “We must do every¬ 
thing possible to help our clients become 
more productive. Our current project to 
create a decision-enabling store that will 
allow users to manipulate data directly is 
an example of that commitment. We se¬ 
lected a relational approach in order to 
gain rapid development capabilities and to 
decrease maintenance and enhancement 
costs as well.” 


The project will take several years to 
fully implement, according to Wren. “It is 
important to move slowly when convert¬ 
ing to relational technology,” she states. 
“Systems people, maintenance people 
and operations people all have to adjust 
and accept it culturally.” 

Removing IMS’s blinders 

Moving to new technology also involves 
the major effort of selecting a vendor, as is 
evidenced by the city of Boston’s iy 2 -year 
search for an alternative to IMS. Since 
the city’s computer operation was a Cobol 
VCM shop with a couple of applications 
created in IMS, initial consideration was 
given to Cobol productivity tools — 
screen painters, report writers and code 
generators. Rather than buy all of these 


rmwSm 









‘arrr,tmce Btafoirjf 


S2 


COMPUTERWORLD 


AUGUST 10,1987 
































DBMS 


SPOTLIGHT 


products from different vendors, howev¬ 
er, city officials decided that obtaining a 
relational data base and getting all of the 
productivity tools from one vendor made 
the most sense. 

MIS personnel evaluated a lot of ven¬ 
dors, saw a lot of slide shows and talked 
with a lot of salesmen before selecting 
CA-Universe from Computer Associates 
International, Inc. It was, according to 
Mike Hernon, chief analyst in Boston’s 
MIS department, a tiring process. “It 
takes a lot of energy,” he says, “to drasti¬ 
cally change your life, even if it is hopeful¬ 
ly for the better.” 

The process was particularly difficult, 
Hernon adds, because there were so 
many close contenders. “There are so 
many good products out there,” he says, 


“that the MIS shops that are married to 
IBM and that will only move from IMS to 
DB2 without ever doing this type of eval¬ 
uation are really missing something.” 

The road behind us 

Technology coexistence is a complex 
realm encompassing a wide range of ac¬ 
tivities, including the creation of new 
strategies, interface gateways, conver¬ 
sion algorithms and administration philos¬ 
ophies, all of which are aimed at incorpo¬ 
rating new relational systems with 
existing DBMS applications. It is a major 
issue that vendors, driven by user re¬ 
quirements, are trying to solve, often on a 
case-by-case basis. 

To fully understand all that is involved 
in achieving technology coexistence, it is 


necessary to look at the forces behind the 
evolution of DBMS. Punch cards and 
magnetic and paper tapes were the se¬ 
quential devices used to store data in ear¬ 
ly computers, making information man¬ 
agement a sequential process. Update 
transactions had to be sorted and grouped 
into batches that could be processed in 
one sequential pass of the data. 

Random-access storage devices ad¬ 
vanced the state of information manage¬ 
ment. One record could contain pointers 
to any other record, and the storage de¬ 
vice could access the records in that or¬ 
der. However, each read or write opera¬ 
tion had to be programmed uniquely and 
at a very low level. A hodgepodge of ap¬ 
proaches was implemented. 

Access methods such as IBM’s VSAM 


were developed to handle I/O in a general- 
purpose manner that relieved one level of 
complication but created another. Low- 
level I/O constructs no longer had I/O re¬ 
coded in each application, but the applica¬ 
tion architecture was so undisciplined 
that systems would store each piece of 
data in several formats, and, many times, 
each new application would result in a 
new copy of the data. Much development 
effort was still required to improve data 
storage and retrieval techniques. 

IBM, working jointly with major aero¬ 
space firms, developed a pilot DBMS proj¬ 
ect to oversee the tracking of the many 
components required for the Apollo space 
program during the mid-1960s. This pilot 
program was the original development 
work that created the hierarchical data 
model-based IMS product line. 

The hierarchical model allows one par¬ 
ent to support multiple children on any 
node. This tree-like structure forced de¬ 
signers to model applications very care- 


m 

■ HERE are so many 
good products out 
JL there that the MIS 
shops that are married to 
IBM and that will only move 
from IMS to DB2 without 
ever doing this type of 
evaluation are really missing 
something.” 

MIKE HERNON 
THE CITY OF BOSTON 


fully, because any design change put ap¬ 
plication development back to square one. 

The Codasyl Committee was responsi¬ 
ble for the first DBMS standard. A data 
base task group was formed that, by 
1971, had convinced the committee to en¬ 
dorse an improved version of the hierar¬ 
chical model. The new network data mod¬ 
el allowed designers to define relation¬ 
ships between any of the nodes without 
having to navigate back up the tree and 
down another branch. 

An early development project based on 
the network model was undertaken at B. 
F. Goodrich Co. It was called IDMS and 
was ultimately purchased by Cullinet 
Software, Inc. 

Breaking tradition 

Traditional DBMS technology had a 
downside, however. MIS departments 
were strapped with maintaining and en¬ 
hancing hierarchical or network-based 
DBMS applications as corporate needs 
grew. Programmers likened this effort to 
having to move boulders. 

Enhancement products such as IMS 
Fastpath were introduced to increase 
transaction processing capacities for the 
banking industry. Performance did, in¬ 
deed, improve, but the already-stressed 
programmers almost buckled under the 
even heavier maintenance load. 

Existing DBMS technology also re¬ 
pelled many users, who regarded it as 
hostile and unusable, feeling that their ap¬ 
plications could not be expressed by a 
model that looked like a tree (the hierar¬ 
chical model) or a spiderweb (the network 
model). 

IBM again went to work, this time on 
creating a relational system at its San 
Jose, Calif., research center. The pilot 


Eliminate the cause 
of up to 50 % of your 
computer downtime= 
power disturbances. 

Power disturbances, brief 
and imperceptible, cause 
very visible data loss, data 
errors, and equipment 
damage, all resulting in 
costly downtime. 

According to AT&T Bell 
Laboratories and IBM 
research, a typical com¬ 
puter site experiences as 
many as 135 commercial 
power disturbances a year, 
accounting for up to 50% of 
all computer downtime. 

The protection solution. 

AT&T offers two product 
lines to combat these dis¬ 
turbances: the Uninterrup¬ 
tible Power System (UPS) 
and the Power Line Condi¬ 
tioner (PLC). Each effec¬ 
tively eliminates power 
fluctuations, including 
noise, transients, peaks, 
brownouts, and distortions. 
The difference being that 
the UPS includes a built-in 
battery reserve for protec¬ 
tion against blackouts. The 
UPS is available in 1,3,5 
and 10 KVA power ranges. 
The PLC is available in 3,5 
and 10 KVA models. 

A 50-year advantage. 

Why specify AT&T’s power 
protection equipment over 
that of other manufactur¬ 
ers? Because AT&T has an 
unmatched 50 years of 


experience in manufactur¬ 
ing power equipment. And, 
because AT&T also designs 
and manufactures com¬ 
puters, we have a unique 
understanding of what 
should go into a superior 
power protection product. 

For instance, our parallel 
processing architecture 
offers reliability few others 
can provide. It also maxi¬ 
mizes cost-efficiency: less 
power is needed to run our 
systems, and heat loss is 
substantially reduced. 

Easy does it. 

AT&T UPS and PLC power 
protection systems are easy 
to install, need no operator, 
and require no scheduled 
maintenance. 

Furthermore, AT&T backs 
you with an unequalled 
nationwide service network 
and a 24-hour toll-free 
number for technical ser¬ 
vice support. 

Fast delivery. 

AT&T is ready to ship from 
stock. Once our Dallas facil¬ 
ity has your order in-hand, 
we’ll have your system 
speeding on its way to your 
site. 

So for maximum security 
against power disturbances, 
along with low-cost, trouble- 
free performance, call AT&T 
at 1800 372-2447 or mail 
the coupon below. Let us 
show you how to turn 
expensive downtime into 
productive uptime. 

6198'’AT&T 


AT&T Power Protection Systems 

Dept. 203130-LEADS, 5S5 Union Blvd, Allentown, PA 18103 

Please send me more information on UPS and PLC. 


CW 8/10/87 




AT&T’s UPS is available in 
1,3,5 and 10 KVA models. 


AT&T 

The right choice. 




AUGUST 10,1987 


COMPUTERWORLD 


S3 

























































DBMS 


:S. V • - ■ 


SPOTLIGHT 


development that emerged, System R, 
would later become DB2 and SQL DS. 

A start-up company, Oracle Corp., in¬ 
fluenced by that development, introduced 
a product that maintained compatibility 
with DB2 and differentiated itself with a 
superset of the SQL user interface. Be¬ 
fore long, another relational development 
project at the University of California at 
Berkeley resulted in two commercial 
products, Ingres from Relational Tech¬ 
nology, Inc. and CA-Universe from Com¬ 
puter Associates. Following that, the in¬ 
fant Unix marketplace contributed 
Informix from Informix Software, Inc. 
and Unify from Unify Corp. Between 
1980 and 1982, relational products were 
released in a steady stream. 

Relational-based DBMS products ini¬ 
tially promised much but often delivered 
little. Products ran slow, and file systems 
crashed. Users gritted their teeth and 
hung on. By 1985, only five years after 
their introduction, relational products 
rapidly matured, becoming quite depend¬ 
able for decision-support applications. 
However, traditional DBMS architec¬ 
tures with nearly three times the market 
maturity still provided better perfor¬ 
mance and enriched integrity features 
and retained most of the lucrative on-line 
transaction processing sector of the mar¬ 
ketplace. 

Straddling old and new 

The latest versions of relational products 
have now matured to the point at which 
they are more powerful than traditional 
data base products in every aspect. 

Even vendors that have well-estab¬ 
lished hierarchical or network products 
seem to take it for granted at this point 
that their customer base for those prod¬ 
ucts will want to integrate relational capa¬ 
bilities, if not convert totally to a relation¬ 
al DBMS. 

IBM, cognizant of the fact that large in¬ 
vestment in traditional technology cannot 
simply be cast by the wayside, is offering 
its IMS customers assistance in bridging 
traditional technology with relational in¬ 
novation by means of synchronization and 
automation of critical systems-adminis- 
tration functions. “We are not going to 
abandon our IMS users,” says Donna 
Vanfleet, senior DBMS product manager 
for both IMS and DB2. “Our IMS user 
base influences our development efforts. 
They know exactly what they need in 
terms of enhancements, and we work 
very closely with them.” 

Cincom Systems, Inc. is also trying to 
satisfy existing users, who are wedded to 
the traditional approach, while moving it¬ 
self decisively into the relational fray. Al¬ 
though active marketing for Total, Cin- 
com’s hierarchical product, has been 
discontinued, the company is still sup¬ 
porting its users, according to Tom 
McLean, vice-president of marketing and 
product planning. 

“We no longer actively market Total, 
and I’m sure that IBM’s IMS user base 
has stopped growing as well,” he says. 
“We continue to service the require¬ 
ments of our Total users, but our empha¬ 
sis and resources are pushing Supra, our 
relational data base product.” 

One notable exception to the “rela- 
tional-is-better” trend is a product from 
Officesmiths, Inc. in Ottawa. It is a unique 
DBMS implementation designed to auto¬ 
mate office information. Officesmiths’ 
DBMS incorporates text processing with¬ 
in a hierarchical model. Documents are 
structured so that each separate heading 


Installed base for medium- to large-scale DBMS 
software 

Projected, growth by equipment category, 1987 to 1991 



1987 

1988 

1989 

1990 

1991 

Minis 

824,100 

1,068,000 

1,343,400 

1,634,400 

1,937,500 

Superminis 

89,100 

124,600 

170,100 

227,000 

297,200 

Mainframes 

163,800 

202,300 

247,800 

299,200 

355,400 

Minisupers/ 

4,620 

6,140 

7,920 

9,840 

11,740 


supers 


INFORMATION PROVIDED BY INTERNATIONAL RESOURCE DEVELOPMENT. INC. 

CW CHART 


and paragraph is defined as a text field of erything,” says Officesmiths President 
unlimited length. Glenn Mclnnes. “The hierarchical model 

“Relational models are not best for ev- is the most efficient way to build a data 


base for documents. This is because docu¬ 
ments are inherently hierarchical in na¬ 
ture.” 

The standards trend 

Open architecture designs allow connec¬ 
tion of different manufacturers’ systems 
to build computer networks. Standard 
network protocols, standard communica¬ 
tions protocols, the Posix operating sys¬ 
tem standards and the X-Open standards 
all support distributed environments. 

Users benefit because their applica¬ 
tions can be moved from one environment 
to another with little reprogramming. 
Chrysler Corp., for example, has utilized 
computing based on open architecture 
standards to help build a competitive 
edge, and DBMS plays a crucial role 




If you’re looking for the Ml power of 
relational technology, there’s just one place 
to find it: SUPRA™ from Cincom®. Because 
no other DBMS gives you the advanced 
relational capabilities to reach such high 
levels of performance and productivity. 

Not even DB2 from IBM®. 


More and more companies with an eye 
for success are capitalizing on all-new, 
advanced relational SUPRA—companies 
like Heublein, Heinz USA, Best Western 
and over 150 others. And it’s easy to see 
why. Each day, they realize the rewards of 
the innovative three-schema architecture 
that enables SUPRA to soar above and 


SUPRAs advantages are clearly visible: 
Unmatched performance. Advanced rela¬ 
tional implementatioa Referential integrity. 
Integrated 4GL capabilities. Entity integrity. 
Redundancy management. Automated data 
design tools. Dictionary facilities. MVS DO! 
and VM versions. And more. Much more. 


beyond DB2. 


S4 


COMPUTERWORLD 


AUGUST 10,1987 

























DBMS 


SPOTLIGHT 


in that effort. 

The Detroit-based Outer Drive Manu¬ 
facturing Technical Center (ODMTC) has 
implemented a relational DBMS to sup¬ 
port loading, cost estimation, equipment 
scheduling and tracking and the establish¬ 
ment of manpower standards. The rela¬ 
tional DBMS selection team looked for a 
system that would allow applications to be 
developed quickly and easily, be flexible 
enough to allow development on a mod¬ 
ule-by-module basis and allow end users 
to analyze their data. 

Joe Bulat is the manager of computer- 
integrated manufacturing (CIM) at the 
Chrysler ODMTC. “We want to spend 
our energy building cars, not data base ap¬ 
plications,” he says. 

“Ingres from Relational Technology 


gives us an open-architecture solution 
that provides us with three key features: 
distributed access, application longevity 
and portability. Portability means free¬ 
dom from hardware vendors and the abili¬ 
ty to finally distribute our information 
management. We look to our vendor to 
provide the gateways required to connect 
our new relational DBMS technology to 
older information systems,” he explains. 

The hardware glove 

Hardware has actually leapfrogged soft¬ 
ware, with advances like very large-scale 
integration circuit technology, high-den- 
sity memories, communications control¬ 
lers and video controllers. 

Users have become accustomed to the 
polished look of bit-mapped graphics in¬ 


terfaces and to the instant response time 
of local processors. 

“Accessing data using a character- 
based terminal attached to a DBMS resid¬ 
ing on the corporate mainframe is like a 
time warp into the previous century for 
these users, ” says Carol Adams, office 
automation product manager for Sun Mi¬ 
crosystems, Inc. 

What the power of relational DBMS 
systems demands, according to Sharon 
Weinberg, president of Codd and Date 
Consulting Group, is the complementary 
power of parallel processing. 

“Parallel processing is the computing 
architecture of the future, and relational 
technology fits it like a hand in a glove,” 
Weinberg remarks. “A single relational 
request will execute a stream of instruc¬ 


tions to perform many tasks that can be 
done in parallel. This is a lightning-fast op¬ 
eration when a CPU can be assigned to 
each task.” 

Contemporary supermicrocomputer 
architecture can provide millions of in¬ 
structions per second (MIPS) for a price 
fifteenfold better than a mainframe, ac¬ 
cording to Kent Godfried, marketing 
manager for Sequent Computer Systems, 
Inc. “Our parallel processing computers 
use tightly coupled parallel processing 
techniques that consist of banks of low- 
cost 32-bit microcomputer modules. 
These banks can be expanded linearly to 
make systems grow with customer 
needs.” 

Sequent offers a range of tightly cou¬ 
pled parallel processing systems that in¬ 
corporate up to 30 CPUs, providing close 
to 100 MIPS of processing power in a sin¬ 
gle computer that can support more than 
400 users. 

Also targeting this market is Tandem, 
which is just completing beta testing of its 
Nonstop SQL, a parallel-architecture re- 


/ 


Data base machines 

1986 market share 




It’s no wonder industry experts have 
called SUPRA the most advanced relational 
I DBMS on the market. 

f Find out how SUPRA can take you to 
is new heights of productivity. Send in the 
H coupon, or call us today 

You’ll soon discover why no other reg¬ 
ional DBMS can face up to SUPRA. 


See Why DB2 Falls Prey To SUPRA. 


Please send me the following on SUPRA:-Uleralure 

_Electronic Brochure_Seminar Schedule 

_Please Have A Salesman Call Me 


Name_ 


Title_ 


Return coupon to: Cincom World Headquarters, 

2300 Montana Avenue, Cincinnati, OH 45211, 

Attn: Marketing Services Dept. Ot; call us toll-free at 

1-800-543-3010 

In Ohio, 513-661-6000. In Canada, 1-416-279-4220. Zl P 


Organization- 
Address_ 


City _ 


©.CINCOM 


State 


.Phone _ 


CW081087 . 

_ J 


“What we used to call competition, 
we ’re now calling prey. 



INFORMATION PROVIDED BY INTERNATIONAL 
RESOURCE DEVELOPMENT, INC. 

CW CHART 


lational DBMS machine. 

The entry-level system can handle 200 
transaction/sec. and, because of parallel 
architecture, can be expanded to more 
than 1,000 transaction/sec. Tandem sup¬ 
ports distributed data bases with its Net¬ 
work Transaction Management Facility. 
Rollback and Rollforward recovery as 
well as two-phased Commit and Pre¬ 
sumed Abort allow distributed users the 
transparent ability to perform updates 
across multiple nodes with high data in¬ 
tegrity. 

Another interesting relational product 
targeting the same market is Sybase from 
Sybase, Inc. in Berkeley, Calif. Significant 
architectural improvements from a mul¬ 
tithreaded data server and stored proce¬ 
dures have given this SQL-based system 
the speed to handle aggressive applica¬ 
tions such as on-line transaction process¬ 
ing. 

Caterpillar, Inc. has a large MIS shop, 
which has been a cornerstone of the IBM 
IMS community, having been involved in 
the initial development of IMS. In 1986, 
the CIM group at Caterpillar made a deci¬ 
sion to adopt relational technology for fu¬ 
ture application development. 

A distributed hardware architecture is 
now in place, using DB2 running on a 
mainframe and linked to a network of Dig¬ 
ital Equipment Corp. VAXs and Apollo 
Computer, Inc. workstations using Oracle 
SQL Star technology. Development is 
performed in the VAX and Apollo envi¬ 
ronments using Oracle, and completed 
applications access data stored on the 
mainframe. About 400 tables have been 
completed since the beginning of this 
year, with the largest having about 12 
million rows. 

The purpose of the relational DBMS 
system, according to Dick Lenz, senior 


AUGUST 10,1987 

: 


COMPUTERWORLD 


S5 






















































































DBMS 


nan 




SPOTLIGHT 


technical support specialist at Caterpillar, 
is to store manufacturing and design con¬ 
trol information. The shift to relational 
will, it is hoped, provide a dynamic envi¬ 
ronment more suited to the changeable 
nature of manufacturing information and 
will allow the Caterpillar CIM group to 
manage and control information more 
easily than they could with IMS, Lenz 
says. 

Lenz claims he is pleased with the out¬ 
come of the change. “Oracle solved our 
heterogeneous hardware problem. It is 
the kind of thing that you read about but 
don’t really believe works. We wanted to 
do this project properly, so we took our 
time and developed a logical design of data 
within the organization. Our technology 
coexistence strategy, and major hurdle, is 


to be able to develop transition programs 
that access both our IMS data and our re¬ 
lational data.” 

There is no way users can do this on 
their own, according to Lenz. “We have 
to look to the vendors for support,” he 
says. “We are looking to IBM or Oracle to 
provide us with key tools, such as an SQL 
interface to IMS.” 

Another example of the trend toward 
the migration of data base management 
from mainframes to minicomputers is 
provided by Boeing Computer Services 
Co. in Seattle. Boeing recently commis¬ 
sioned Integrated Automation, Inc. to de¬ 
velop a drawing and document storage 
and retrieval system. The system, which 
has the Ingres DBMS as its heart, runs on 
a network of DEC VAXs with 700M bytes 


of magnetic storage devices and 64G 
bytes of optical-storage devices. 

Operators use high-resolution displays 
to check the quality of engineering and 
documentation drawings fed in by many 
types of high-speed scanners. Once a 
drawing has been successfully input, it 
can be called back from the data base at 
will and examined or revised. Laser print¬ 
ers or plotters are able to give users hard 
copy, if desired. 

Integrated productivity tools 

Fourth-generation languages and related 
productivity tools such as report writers, 
screen painters and code generators all 
help developers speed applications from 
concept to final product. 

With the upsurge of interest in applica¬ 


tion productivity and portability, such 
tools have also become important for the 
buffering they provide between the appli¬ 
cation and the hardware and operating 
system. “The key to solving the technol¬ 
ogy coexistence issue,” says Ron Hank, 
senior manager for corporate relations at 
Cincom, “is to have a language integrated 
into the DBMS so that the combined 
product completely handles all interfaces. 
Users can then move their applications 
from one environment to another, with¬ 
out having to change a single line of appli¬ 
cation code.” 

Amex Life Assurance Co. in San Ra¬ 
fael, Calif., which is using Cincom’s Supra 
relational DBMS on an IBM mainframe 
with Cincom’s Mantis application devel¬ 
opment language, has found that, with the 
productivity of these tools, more time can 
be spent on the philosophy behind the ap¬ 
plication rather than on the details of the 
implementation architecture and applica¬ 
tion coding. 

Amex spent one year developing a 
strict entity relationship model of the 


T HE KEY to solving 
the technology 
coexistence issue is 
to have a language integrated 
into the DBMS so that the 
combined product completely 
handles all interfaces.” 

RON HANK 
CINCOM SYSTEMS, INC. 


company. The entity relationship model 
was developed in conjunction with a busi¬ 
ness model that defined the business rules 
of the company, and groups of users were 
interviewed by the MIS data designers in 
two-day joint application development 
meetings. 

After these models were completed, a 
processing model was developed that 
showed which applications were on-line, 
which were to be batched and how data 
flowed between procedures. Finally, a 
technology model was developed that de¬ 
fined the hardware and software that 
would be used to implement the systems. 

“It was a very interesting process to 
witness,” says Lee McGee, data analysis 
specialist. “My senior management took 
the time to sell the other executives in the 
company on the importance of the pro¬ 
cess. Interacting with people and watch¬ 
ing their reactions as they learned to 
think about our business from a modeling 
point of view was very worthwhile.” 

As Amex’s time investment indicates, 
data modeling, once regarded as an aca¬ 
demic exercise, is now considered a cru¬ 
cial step in the development process, 
largely because of the increased complex¬ 
ity of data base projects. 

“Data modeling is not an esoteric pas¬ 
time,” says Chris Turnbull, president of 
Zanthe Information, Inc. in Nepean, Ont., 
“but a very effective tool that helps data 
base designers to better solve real-world 
problems. 

“In 1977, Peter Chen of MIT pub¬ 
lished a paper describing the entity rela¬ 
tionship model, which constituted an im¬ 
portant extension to the relational model. 
The model views the real world as being 
composed of groups of ‘things’ called enti¬ 
ty sets and the relationships that we know 
Continued on page S8 


INFORMIX? It’s the fastest RDBMS for UNIX*And 
now it has a high-performance option that makes it 
even faster. 

Introducing INFORMIX-TURBO, the first fault- 
tolerant transaction processing database server for UNIX. 

It lets INFORMIX-SQL and INFORMIX-4GL fly 
through large databases. With features like optimized 
data layout. Adjustable-size shared memory. And 
tunable performance parameters. 

And to keep even the most demanding multi-user 
databases flying, there’s our fault-tolerant feature. 
Which makes for speedy recovery from system crashes. 

Of course, it’s technology like this that has made 
INFORMIX the best-selling RDBMS for UNIX.* And a 
leading contender in MS*-DOS, VMS“and networked 
systems. 

Fbr our latest benchmarks, graphs and more 
on INFORMIX-TURBO, write Informix Software,4100 
Bohannon Drive, Menlo Park, CA 94025. Or call 
415/ 322-4100. And bring your database up to speed. 

INFORMIX 

The RDBMS for people who know better* 



S6 


COMPUTERWORLD 


AUGUST 10,1987 





















DBMS 


SPOTLIGHT 


INTERVIEW 

RELATIONAL COMES ON-LINE 


Robert Epstein, 34, is executive vice-president and cofounder of Sy¬ 
base, Inc., as well as chief architect of the Sybase System. Previous¬ 
ly, he was vice-president of development at Britton Lee, Inc. and 
principal architect of its data base machines. In the late 1970s, he 
served as project manager for the Ingres project at the University of 
California at Berkeley. Epstein recently spoke with Richard Skrinde 
about the direction he expects the market for relational data base 
management systems to take. 


Sybase claims to provide 
the first relational DBMS 
for on-line applications. 
What is the market re¬ 
sponse? 

People are moving toward more 
aggressive, more interactive ap¬ 
plications. And often, they are 
finding they must move toward 
new technologies to support 
those applications. 

We’re finding essentially two 
types of customers. The first 
type is the existing relational 
DBMS user. These people are 
now looking at building applica¬ 
tions with stringent perfor¬ 
mance, integrity and availability 
requirements not provided by 
current relational DBMS prod¬ 
ucts. 

We also see new users who 
have never used a relational 
product before because all their 
applications require a level of 
function, speed and support that 
were previously not provided by 
relational DBMSs. 

Hierarchical and network 
data base systems pro¬ 
vide the performance, 
availability and reliability 
required for on-line trans¬ 
action processing. So why 
use relational DBMSs? 

This gets back down to the in¬ 
herent benefits of relational sys¬ 
tems — productivity, flexibility 
and maintainability, as well as 
built-in decision support capabili¬ 
ties. 

Your data base is a mirror of 
your business. And, as things 
change in the external world as 
well as in corporate policies, 
your data base and applications 
must reflect those changes. 

Relational DBMSs allow you 
to make those changes much 
more easily than with hierarchi¬ 
cal or network systems. Also, 
when users need to run ad hoc 
queries on data, they don’t need 
to transfer it to a relational sys¬ 
tem; they can actually have the 


decision support component 
built right in. 

What does it take for a re¬ 
lational DBMS to support 
on-line applications? 

The three primary distinguish¬ 
ing features between on-line and 
decision support ad hoc applica¬ 
tions are performance, availabil¬ 
ity and data integrity. There is 
no inherent reason why a rela¬ 
tional DBMS cannot provide 
these capabilities. But the em¬ 
phasis on relational systems up 
to this point has been on produc¬ 
tivity and ease of use. 

The founding of Sybase was 
oriented toward the vision that 
the market would evolve and 
start to demand that SQL be the 
only data base framework. Well, 
this couldn’t happen if the prod¬ 
uct didn’t have the ability to pro¬ 
vide on-line support. And to 
achieve that, you have to build a 
new architecture from the 
ground up. 

That architecture had to in¬ 
corporate some of the things 
that worked with the hierarchi¬ 
cal and network products, which 
are known for their high-volume 
performance and operational 
features. 

What relational DBMS 
software architecture is 
required to support on¬ 
line applications? 

What we’ve got is a requester- 
server architecture. Requester- 
server architecture is a term 
that is beginning to be used quite 
a bit, so let me explain the three 
fundamental concepts behind it. 

The first is the clear separa¬ 
tion between the front-end appli¬ 
cation and tools and the data 
base engine. The second compo¬ 
nent is that the data base engine 
itself, rather than the operating 
system, has to manage multiple 
users and multiple processes. 
We call this multithreaded serv¬ 
er architecture. Finally, the third 


fundamental component of re¬ 
quester-server architecture is 
the notion of moving transac¬ 
tion-integrity logic, or program¬ 
ming intelligence, into the data 
base itself. 

Some of this we’ve taken 
from the mainframe world. 

Multithreaded server archi¬ 
tecture is a good example. This 
concept comes from the fact 
that, in the mainframe world, the 
data base, not the operating sys¬ 
tem, handles multiple users con¬ 
currently. Moving the data in¬ 
tegrity from the application into 
the data base was done with the 
notion of adding procedural logic 
in the data base, and products 
like IMS and IDMS provide ca¬ 
pabilities like this. 

Is Sybase going to support 
users trying to migrate out 
of hierarchical and net¬ 
work data bases? 

The first goal for aiding conver¬ 
sion is coexistence. Applications 
are not static; they grow and 
change. Our goal is to use Sy¬ 
base’s distributed technology 
and open architecture to allow 
people to complement existing 
applications with new functions 
in Sybase. Sybase then acts as an 
application driver in existing ap¬ 
plication environments to insert 
and retrieve data. 

To provide coexistence, you 
have to provide gateways to ma¬ 
chine environments where you 
can send transactions to those 
machines and have them trans¬ 
late it into IMS, IDMS or what¬ 
ever application environment 
they are currently running un¬ 
der. And then it must be possible 
to pull that data and extract it 
back into a Sybase environment 
as part of a full transaction or re¬ 
port. 

What about distributed 
data bases? 

There are a lot of issues with dis¬ 
tributed. Right now, it’s a tech¬ 
nology in its infancy. And there 
are a few vendors who are at¬ 
tempting to provide a distributed 
solution — Sybase is one of 
those companies. Ultimately, it 
is our belief vendors will have to 
work together to provide a solu¬ 
tion that is totally distributed. 

Today, we are providing 


transparent distributed update 
capabilities, complete with a 
two-phase commit protocol. 
We’ve implemented this first be¬ 
cause in on-line applications, up¬ 
date capabilities are much more 
crucial than retrievals. 

The requester-server archi¬ 
tecture is especially important in 
distributed architecture. The 
ability to store data integrity in 
the data base allows for multisite 
integrity. This is key in estab¬ 
lishing distributed data bases 
across multiple sites. 



Robert Epstein 


ALAN WITSCHONKE 


Imagine the reaction of a per¬ 
son responsible for a data base in 
one city to the possibility that 
someone else, in a city he has 
never heard of, will be able to up¬ 
date his data base. There is no 
way that first person will allow 
that to happen unless he can con¬ 
trol the kinds of updates that will 
be made. 

What environments are 
you planning to support? 

We’ve identified several strate¬ 
gic hardware environments we 
intend to support. Our strategy 
is to remain focused on those 
hardware environments. Be¬ 
cause we are so oriented to per¬ 
formance, we can’t afford to 
trade off performance in order to 
support a wide range of systems. 

Currently, our system runs 
on VAX/VMS and Sun Unix, and 
we support the networks that 
are used to tie these hardware 
systems together. Our focus is 
on VAX, on the IBM mainframe, 
on a few key Unix systems and, 
of course, the personal comput¬ 
er. • 


AUGUST 10,1987 


COMPUTERWORLD 


S7 

















DBMS 



Coexistence 

CONTINUED FROM PAGE S6 

exist between these things.” Zanthe has 
created a data base product, called Zim, 
that allows data base designers to define a 
data base in terms of the entity relation¬ 
ship model, saving them the chore of hav¬ 
ing to convert a model into relational or 
traditional data base format. 

Many vendors are focusing on speed¬ 
ing the process of developing a data model 
into a finished application. Data Language 
Corp. has specialized in this integrated 
language and DBMS approach with a 
product called Progress, which has re¬ 
ceived much critical acclaim. It was se¬ 
lected by NCR Corp. to be the vehicle for 


all future in-house development. 

Applied Data Research, Inc., develop¬ 
er of the powerful Ideal language environ¬ 
ment, was impressed enough with Pro¬ 
gress to purchase the source rights to 
integrate it into its product line. Data 
Language Corp. is just releasing an appli¬ 
cation generator that will help speed ap¬ 
plication development with Progress. 

Another developer, Unify Corp., has 
opted to create a relational DBMS appli¬ 
cation development tool for the Unix and 
DOS environments. The product, called 
Accell, is said to help developers build 
transaction-oriented processing systems 
faster by using an event-driven system in 
which users fill out prompts and select 
items from menus. The resulting applica¬ 
tion is then linked to the data base. 


Focus from Information Builders, Inc. 
is a strong product that is gaining momen¬ 
tum as it is migrated to more and more 
machine environments. 

It is SQL, however, that is destined to 
become the Cobol of the data base world. 
SQL is a key component in linking dispa¬ 
rate data base architectures. It is the only 
language interface to a data base that of¬ 
fers any kind of standard across manufac¬ 
turers. This is very important to large or¬ 
ganizations trying to tie many data base 
systems into a network as well as to value- 
added resellers (VAR) that are interested 
in moving applications from one data base 
product to another. 

Natural language interfaces are a spe¬ 
cialized subset of the category of produc¬ 
tivity enhancement tools. Natural lan- 



“In the fashion business 
three months is a lifetime. 
IDEAL saved us years.” 

—Ken Daly, Director, 

Management Information Services 
[sprit de Corp 


s 

< 

i 


r he business world moves so fast today 
that no company can afford to let the 
process of developing applications 
slow them down. 

That’s why hundreds of companies 
like Esprit de Corp, the Dell Publishing 
Company and the Amstar Sugar Corpora¬ 
tion use ADR/IDEAL*. 

At Esprit, rebuilding their system with 
COBOL would have taken far longer than 
it has with IDEAL. They found that new 
development went three times faster with 


IDEAL. Maintenance, five times faster. 

That’s because IDEAL has a more ef¬ 
ficient language. So programmers are able 
to get more work done with less code. 

And IDEAL lets programmers work 
more efficiently. Their terminal becomes 
the single interactive workstation for all 
phases of development. 

Programmers also work smarter with 
IDEAL. Its intelligent editors generate 
syntactically correct code. And its struc¬ 
tured language builds programs that are 


easier to understand and maintain. 

And ADR* can help you get the most 
from IDEAL with our pre-installation 
consulting service, training programs and 
worldwide support network that solves 
technical problems around the clock. 

To learn how IDEAL can unlock the 
potential of your people and computers 
call 1-800-ADR-WARE. 

ADR PERFORMANCE SOFTWARE. 
Unlock the potential. 


Ameritech; Official Communications Company 
for theltonth Pan American Games 
Indianapolis ■ 7-23 August 1987 


ADR 


AN StmEniTECH COMPANY 


Applied Data Research, Inc. Orchard Road & Rt 206, CN-8, Princeton, NJ 08540 1-201-874-9000. 


guage products, available from companies 
such as Intellicorp or Natural Language, 
Inc., serve as front ends for query lan¬ 
guages and provide a conversational 
means of accessing and retrieving data. 

Technology brought to life 

Data base technology has reached a pla¬ 
teau at which the tools exist to create ex¬ 
tremely sophisticated applications. A 
shortfall occurs in the supply of skilled 
people who have sufficient understanding 
of how these new tools can be applied. To 
some extent, this gap is being filled by a 
growing cadre of VARs who are working 
to integrate relational DBMS technology 
into existing applications. 

One example of this activity is provid¬ 
ed by McDonnell Douglas Corp., which is 
acting as a VAR for Oracle in the comput¬ 
er-aided design (CAD) market. Recently, 
McDonnell Douglas interfaced the Oracle 
DBMS to its Graphics Design System 
(GDS) CAD system and created an inter¬ 
face product called SQL CAD. 


H aving superior 

technology is no 
longer the trump 
card in this business.... The 
relational DBMS vendor that 
flourishes will be the one that 
provides the best support/' 

PETER TIERNEY 
ORACLE CORP. 


Paul Scarponcini, product manager for 
DBMS and knowledge-based products at 
McDonnell Douglas Information Systems 
Group, explains what the addition of rela¬ 
tional data base capability contributes to 
the product. “Users are now able to do 
some extraordinary things,” he says. 

“For example, the blueprint of a build¬ 
ing could be created in GDS, and then a 
set of tables defining the attributes of the 
critical objects within the blueprint could 
be created with Oracle,” he continues. “A 
query requesting the location of all fire 
extinguishers within the building could be 
entered into the system using SQL CAD, 
via its graphical interface. And the GDS 
would display all of the fire extinguisher 
locations on the blueprint as a graphic il¬ 
lustration.” 

Oracle has determined that, before the 
DBMS market evolves any further, there 
must be a period of integration and ab¬ 
sorption. “Support training and education 
have been our marching orders,” says Pe¬ 
ter Tierney, vice-president of marketing 
at Oracle, adding that the funds raised by 
making the company public last year were 
not pumped into technology development 
or marketing as might have been expect¬ 
ed but into the training of more than 250 
consultants, the development of a net¬ 
work of 120 VARs and a beefing up of the 
education and support staff. 

“Having superior technology is no 
longer the trump card in this business,” 
Tierney says. “Before long, every surviv¬ 
ing relational data base vendor will have a 
similar technology, and they will all be ex¬ 
cellent. The relational DBMS vendor that 
flourishes will be the one that provides 
the best support. Even the largest MIS 
shops must rely on the vendor for sup¬ 
port. Helping users achieve technology 
coexistence is, at the center, a support is¬ 
sue.” • 


S8 


COMPUTERWORLD 


AUGUST 10,1987 

















DBMS 


SPOTLIGHT 


Developers can’t afford 
dependence on magic 

BY STEVEN CANIANO 


There’s a scene being played out with in¬ 
creasing frequency between application 
developers and data base managers. It is a 
confrontational one about false expecta¬ 
tions that has its roots in the mythology 
surrounding relational data base manage¬ 
ment systems. The dialogue usually goes 
something like this: 

Application developer: “I’m having 
problems with my system.” 

Data base manager: “What sort of 
problems?” 

Application developer: “Response 
time is just terrible. I think it’s the 
DBMS.” 

Data base manager: “Why is that?” 

Application developer: “Well, it just 
isn’t a good product, and, besides, every¬ 
one I’ve ever spoken to says it’s a real 
dog. I think we should convert to another 
product. I know of a better one.” 

Data base manager: “Well, before you 
do that, how about if we get together to 
discuss your logical and physical data base 
design?” 

Application developer: “My what?!? 
This is a relational system!” 

In simpler times, when there were 
only two kinds of data bases — hierarchi¬ 
cal and network — scenes like this were 
unknown. 

The freedom of relational DBMS 

In the modern world, there is another 
technology available to the application de¬ 
veloper known as the mystical and magi¬ 
cal relational DBMS. As everyone now 
knows, this wonderful invention frees the 
application developer from the necessity 
of undertaking the laborious and highly it¬ 
erative (and, in most cases, uninteresting) 
tasks of planning and verification. It is 
now possible to build applications without 


Caniano is a member of the technical staff at 
AT&T in Piscataway, N J. He is responsible for the 
evaluation and recommendation of DBMS prod¬ 
ucts for the Unix operating system within AT&T. 


even considering what used to take many 
months of effort. The relational systems 
allow us to define an application, throw 
the data base up and enter the “select 
where” world of data access routines. 

Best of all, because so little time is re¬ 
quired to build a system and because 
there are so many other products avail¬ 
able on the market, if we get stuck with a 
lemon it would be a relatively small effort 
to rewrite the entire application using a 
new product. 

How is it that the relational systems 
have become immune to the plagues that 
tormented their forefathers? Well, the 
truth is that they haven’t, and anyone who 
believes otherwise will more than likely 
exhaust their fiscal year’s software bud¬ 
get faster than you can say “fourth-gen¬ 
eration language.” 

A relational DBMS is really not magic, 
regardless of what you’ve been told. It is 
merely a sophisticated piece of software, 
and it is only as smart as you allow it to be. 
All the issues that existed with hierarchi¬ 
cal and network DBMSs are still present 
in the relational world. 

The beauty of a relational data base is 
that the programmer can be oblivious to 
the fact that the storage structure of a ta¬ 
ble has changed. However, this does not 
mean it is no longer necessary to be aware 
of storage structures. On the contrary, a 
data base should be built by a data base de¬ 
signer who has learned the requirements 
for an application and has carefully made 
choices by weighing access strategies 
against key selections, indexing tech¬ 
niques, secondary key selections and file 
placements. 

If accesses are not carefully planned 
and users are given the freedom to access 
the data base in any imaginable manner, 
performance will go flying out the win¬ 
dow. This would also be true of a hierar¬ 
chical or network system. The difference 
is that while in the latter case people 
would think twice about traversing many 


DB2 

SUPPORT . 
IS COMING! 


DSIMS 

Data Dictionary 

(Formerly UCC-Ten) 

Soon our customers will have the same control, 
cross-referencing, reporting, and easy statement 
generation capabilities for DB2 information, that 
they’ve enjoyed for years with their IMS Systems. 
Call us today to learn more about the DSIMS Data 
Dictionary. DSIMS provides solutions for data and 
database administration. 


DSIMS corporation 

2730 Stemmons Freeway • Suite 401 West 

Dallas, Texas 75207 

214/630-7837 


segments and links of a data base because 
of the enormous complexity involved, the 
relational model encourages ambitious 
queries. 

So why are so many people blind to the 
fact that relational data base design is a 
skill just as network data base design is? 
Why is it that people who work so hard to 
write efficient application code allow a 
piece of software to control the heart of 
their system? Why is it that when people 
hear the word “relational,” they suddenly 
believe in magic? 

One reason is the undeniable simplicity 
of the relational model. This is an excel¬ 
lent feature when you want to prototype 
an application or build a simplistic data 
base. It is this idea of simplicity, however, 
that causes many of the relational prod¬ 
ucts to earn bad reputations. 

Part of the fault also lies with the ven¬ 
dors of the relational products. In an ef¬ 
fort to sell as many systems as possible, 
they have, at times, done their products 
an injustice. 

Many systems have been sold to un¬ 
suspecting end users with no reference to 
the importance of data base fundamen¬ 
tals. Customers have been led to believe it 
is the product that performs and that the 
manner in which you use the product is ir¬ 
relevant. 

Between this misinformation and the 
fact that the systems are so easy to use 
that “anyone can do it,” it is not surpris¬ 
ing that the result has been poor data base 
designs. The vendors have, in effect, 
made data base designers of us all, and 
there are now many people building rela¬ 
tional data bases who have never even 
heard of data normalization. 

Even more sophisticated users fall 
prey to sales pitches that concentrate on 
the bells and whistles and promises of 
maximum performance, but leave out de¬ 
tails such as what you have to do to 
achieve the promised efficiency. 

The worst part is that there is no 
screw you can turn, no query you can opti¬ 
mize more efficiently, no turbo engine you 
can add to the DBMS that will cure a basic 
case of poor data base design. 


A user’s first impulse is to point the fin¬ 
ger of blame at the DBMS. After all, it was 
supposed to deliver the best performance 
without any effort, and it’s not perform¬ 
ing. The logical conclusion to this, of 
course, is to go out and buy a better prod¬ 
uct. And the cycle continues. 

So who profits? Certainly not the user. 
After buying at least two relational DBMS 
products (which are far from inexpensive) 
and rewriting an application, probably us¬ 
ing the same flawed data base design 
techniques each time, the user is stuck 
with a huge software bill, a system that 
still doesn’t perform well and the pros¬ 
pect of having to call in a highly paid con¬ 
sultant to analyze his application and re¬ 
design the data base. 

What about the vendors? Do they ben¬ 
efit? Possibly, but only in the short term, 
because eventually the misuse they are 
encouraging will rebound and blacken the 
reputations of what may, in fact, be very 
good products. 

What can be done 

So what is the answer? Unfortunately, 
there is no one answer unless we choose 
to turn our backs on the very real advan¬ 
tages that relational DBMSs offer. 

The vendors could help the situation 
greatly by putting more emphasis on the 
workings of the relational model and on 
solid design and maintenance techniques. 
They should stress that good perfor¬ 
mance isn’t automatic but depends on 
what a user does with a product. 

Much of the application rewriting and 
data base conversion going on today could 
also be avoided if developers would look 
more closely at the relational DBMSs 
they have before looking for solutions in 
still another purchase. Chances are, a 
competent development group could 
write a successful application using any of 
the popular packages available today. 

The real solution does not lie in DBMS 
selection but in data base design. Just be¬ 
cause relational DBMSs are gifted with 
great flexibility and adaptability does not 
mean that we can afford to lose touch with 
the art of data base design. • 


N 


SQL/DS. . . 


THE EASY WAY 


ow SQL/DS database manage¬ 
ment can be easier and more powerful 
with VMSQL/EDIT—the new multi-func¬ 
tion table editor from VM Software, Inc. 

With VMSQI/EDIT’s full-screen display, 
even non-experienced SQL users can easi¬ 
ly update data stored in SQL/DS tables. 

VMSQL/EDIT gives you a more power¬ 
ful way to work with tables including the 
ability to update, insert, delete, and re- 


■/ 

. 


. 


At last, 
professional 
support for 
SQL/DS users. 


view on both single and multiple rows of 
tables. It also includes a powerful macro 
facility that dramatically reduces the 
time needed to build ad hoc data entry 
applications. 

To find out exactly how easy SQL/DS 
databases really can be with the right 
help, call today. We’ll send you a free 
copy of the new SQL/DS Quick Reference 
Handbook just for calling. 

Applied Relational Technology 

A division of VM Software, Inc. 

To get your free SQLDS Quick Reference Hand¬ 
book that gives you a complete listing of system 
catalog names, SQL commands, built-in functions, 
as well as data type definitions and expression 
syntax, call today. 

800-562-7100 OR 703-264-8000 


VM 

SOFTWARE INC. 


1800 Alexander Bell Drive 
Reston, VA 22091 

Available only in U.S. and Canada. 

l-CWX-870810 


AUGUST 10,1987 


COMPUTERWORLD 


S9 



















"We sell power equipment. And 
now we ; ve got a powerful 
system to handle our informa¬ 
tion management needs. It 7 s a 
secure feeling to know that 
your development tools are as 
good as the people you hire to 
use them . 77 r\ 


Hexie McDonnold 
Director of Data Processing 
Snapper Power Equipment 
A Subsidiary of FUQUA 
Industries, Inc. 


















IDMS/R, 

=RHD 



Mowing down the competition in 
the outdoor power equipment busi¬ 
ness takes more than quality prod¬ 
ucts. The efficiency of accessing 
information throughout the organiza¬ 
tion is what ultimately puts you on 
the cutting edge. That ; s why Snapper 

- a DOS shop - turned to Culliners 
IDMS/R. 

By replacing their COBOL system 
witn Culliners integrated relational 
architecture ; Snapper has been able 
to maintain large databases and pro¬ 
vide everyone instant access to infor¬ 
mation. And with ADS/OnLine - 
Cullinet ; s fourth-generation program¬ 
ming language - Snapper has been 
able to cut and trim applications 
development time and costs. 

Cullinet ; s comprehensive infor¬ 
mation management technology is 
the root cause of some impressive 
Snapper results. A new bill of materials 
format, for example, now provides 
both engineering and production data 
with up-to-the-minute accuracy. 
IDMSAR has improved access to 
inventory, order status, current pric¬ 
ing, current costs, finished gooas 
status and credit information. 

Snapper's small staff has been 
able to develop large claim services 

- including group medical and 
co-op advertising, promotions and 
warranty service credits. And 
Snapper has found greener pastures 
in IDMS/R 7 s automatic recovery 
feature that ensures availability 

of data. 

For more information on how 
your company can access Cullinet 
through IDMS/R, call toll-free 1-800- 
551-4555. Or write to Cullinet 
Software, Inc., 400 Blue Hill Drive, 
Westwood, MA 02090-2198. 


Cullinet 


An Information Technolo 
For The 80s, 90s An 


Integrator 

eyond. 


Now available to OEMs and VARs. 


i 








DBMS 


SPOTLIGHT 


BY JAMES BRADLEY 

Two of the most important 
data base management 
systems on the market are 
IBM’s DB2 and Cullinet 
Software, Inc.’s IDMS/R. 
Perhaps the best way to compare these 
two systems is to begin with what they 
have in common, which is that both are 
fundamentally network systems. 

The term “network,” first applied to 
Codasyl systems in the 1970s to differen¬ 
tiate them from hierarchical data base 
systems, has now become almost synony¬ 
mous with the approach used by Codasyl 
systems such as IDMS/R. Unfortunately, 
this can be confusing, since it does not 
help distinguish Codasyl systems from re¬ 
lational systems that are also fundamen¬ 
tally network systems, such as DB2, 
which began to be important in the 1980s. 

What exactly does this mean? A data 
base is basically a collection of files that 
are related. With a relational data base, 
the files, as seen by users, are rather re¬ 
stricted in format — no variable-length 
records and no duplicate records are al¬ 
lowed. In more technical terms, the files 
are of a restricted type known as rela¬ 
tions. With a Codasyl system, the files are 
not restricted to relations, and variable- 
length records are allowed, although they 
are not common; thus, in practice, most 
files in a Codasyl data base will often quali¬ 
fy as relations. Therefore, from a practi¬ 
cal point of view, we can often ignore the 
fact that relational data bases are made up 
of a more restricted kind of file than Coda¬ 
syl data bases. 

Network vs. hierarchy 

In saying the files of both types of data 
base form a network, we mean a network 
as opposed to a hierarchy. If the files of a 
data base form a hierarchy, we have a pyr¬ 
amid structure, with one file at the top 
called the root file. Call this File A. At the 
next level, there could be Files B and C. 
File A will be the parent of B and C. This 
means that for one A record there are 
many related B records as well as many 
related C records. 

In the hierarchy, B will be the parent of 
some child files at the next level down, 
perhaps P, Q and R; similarly, C may be 
the parent of child files W and X and so on 
through the hierarchy. 

In such a hierarchical structure, every 
file except the root file has a parent, or 
equivalently, every file has zero or one 
parent files. It was structures such as 
these that IBM’s IMS was originally de¬ 
signed to manage. 

If a structure of related files does not 
form a hierarchy, it must form a network, 
for in a network, at least one file will have 


Bradley specializes in data base management at the 
University of Calgary. He is the author of File and 
DataBase Techniques (1982), Introduction to 
Data Base Management in Business, 2nd Edition 
(1987) and Case Studies in Business Data Bases 
(1987), all published by Holt, Rinehart & Winston in 
New York. 


Desk top publishing is a very effi¬ 
cient way to produce documents, 
including forms. It automates the 
creation of forms. But it doesn’t 
really automate forms. 

Electronic forms technology 
does. Electronic forms do every¬ 
thing paper ones do, without paper¬ 
work. You can fill them in, route 
them, distribute copies, approve 
them, revise them and file them, all 
on your system. 

New technology from Electronic 
Form Systems actually combines 
your forms and your computer sys¬ 
tem — and the combination makes 
both more powerful. 

The key: Keep the data and the 
form separate. 

If you fill in a form created with a 
desk top publishing package, the 
data that fills the blanks becomes 
part of the form. With electronic 
forms, you see the form and the data 
together on the screen and on the 
printout, but the system sees them 
as separate files that can be manip¬ 
ulated separately. 

That separation unleashes im¬ 
pressive power. 

How a smart form helps a 
company work smarter. 

Filling out paper forms takes a lot 
of time. Every process in your com¬ 
pany is subject to the speed limit of 
paper. Electronic forms remove that 
limit. 

The form appears on the com¬ 
puter screen. It looks just like the 
ones your company uses now. As 
the user enters information, the 
form helps fill itself out. 

The form can do calculations 
with the data entered in a given 
blank and enter the result in an¬ 
other blank. For example, an invoice 
form can add the sales tax by itself. 

The form can automatically pull 
in data from an existing database. 
When you put a customer’s name 
on an order form, for example, the 
form can add the address, phone, 
account number, billing instruc¬ 
tions, whatever you wish. Once on 
the form, this “imported” data can 
be modified just like data entered at 
the keyboard. 

When the same information goes 


on several pages of a form, the legal 
description of a piece of property in 
a mortgage document, for example, 
you enter it only once. The system 
automatically puts it in all the right 
places. (A mortgage company went 
from six sets of documents per per¬ 
son per day to thirty-six.) 

Information on one form can trig¬ 
ger the system to pull all the other 
forms to make up a set. To assemble 
an insurance policy, for example, 
the system can key on the state and 
the insured’s age and automatically 
pull all the proper endorsements. 

Desk top publishing can’t do any¬ 
thing like this. 

How you “teach” your 
smart form. 

To tell the smart form what to do 
with the data entered in each blank, 
you create a “form map” with soft¬ 
ware from Electronic Form Systems. 
It doesn’t require programming 
skills; it’s less complex than a 
spreadsheet. 

You can tell each blank: 

•A formula for automatic calcula¬ 
tion with that data and where to 
put the result. 

•Other locations where this data 
should go on the form and other 
forms. 

•What other forms should be in¬ 
cluded in the set. 

•Criteria for valid data: whether it 
should be letters, numbers, dollars, 
how many digits, how many deci¬ 
mal places, and so forth. 

How the smart form can “teach” 
the user. 

When you tell the smart form 
what to do, you can also tell the 
user what to do. You can create indi¬ 
vidual help windows for each blank. 
When the user gets stuck, a touch of 
F10 brings up a window with de¬ 
tailed instructions on what the 
company wants in that blank. 

Your forms become the 
capture point. 

Most companies spend money to 
capture the same information twice: 
First when someone puts it on a 
form, and later when someone 
reads it off the form and enters it 
into the computer. Electronic forms 
end this duplication because data 


entered for the form can be ex¬ 
ported to a DOS file for use in all 
your other applications. Data cap¬ 
ture for the form and data capture 
for the computer are one. 

When someone fills out an order 
form, for example, the sales infor¬ 
mation could be automatically sent 
to your inventory application. 
Travel expenses could be automat¬ 
ically copied from expense reports 
to a Lotus® spreadsheet in the de¬ 
partment head’s PC. Billable hours 
could be sent from individual time 
sheets into the billing and accounts 
receivable package. 

To tell the system where to send 
the data, you create an “external 
data map” with software from Elec¬ 
tronic Form Systems. Data can be 
exported (or imported) in Data In¬ 
terchange Format, PRN (delimited 
ASCII), or System Data Format. 
In addition to Lotus, Electronic 
Form Systems supports dBase III, 
communications software and 
customer-supplied file transfer 
packages. 


A true electronic form will 
eliminate hidden costs. 


The smart form from Electronic 
Form Systems is more than a better 
way to make forms. It’s a better way to 
manage information. It lets people 
work faster. It lets you stop handling 
the same information twice. And it 
cuts several other costs associated 
with paper forms. Some of those 
costs are visible, but the largest of 
them are hidden. 

Visible cost — Creating forms. 

With the Formcoder from Elec¬ 
tronic Form Systems, you can create a 
new electronic form and be using it in 
less than two hours. No typesetting, 
no artwork, no printing. And it doesn’t 
take a programmer; a good word pro¬ 
cessing operator can do it. 

Visible cost — 
Inventorying forms. 

Your company now leases thou¬ 
sands of square feet to store forms. 
And money is tied up in forms inven¬ 
tory, probably six figures. 

Electronic forms are stored in the 


Electronic Form Systems is a division of Computer Language Research, Inc. 


PRODUCT FACE-OFF 

IDMS/R excels at volume, 
DB2 at complexity 


more than one parent. Both relational and 
Codasyl systems can handle just about any 
data base structure and are therefore 
both network systems. 

This last statement needs some quali¬ 
fying, however. What connects the files in 


any data base structure is relationships. 
One-to-many relationships, which are by 
far the most common in all data bases, 
generally connect the files of both Coda¬ 
syl and relational systems in a network. 

The methods employed in handling 
these relationships are, however, quite 
different. 

Codasyl systems handle one-to-many 
relationships by means of a construct 
called a Codasyl set, in which each ele¬ 
ment of the set consists of a parent record 
together with its child records. Common¬ 
ly, such sets are implemented by means of 
pointers embedded in the records of the 
files, as with IDMS/R. 

With relational systems, the one-to- 
many relationships are handled by a vari¬ 
ety of methods that may or may not in¬ 


volve pointers. DB2 does permit the use 
of pointers, although these never have to 
be specified by the person defining the 
data base; in contrast, an IDMS/R Coda¬ 
syl data base definition requires pointer 
specifications. 

What is common to relational systems 
like DB2 and Codasyl systems like IDMS/ 
R is that both of the system types can 
manage data bases that have a network 
structure, and the files of the network are 
connected by one-to-many relationships 
implemented differently in the two sys¬ 
tem types. 

However, there are other types of re¬ 
lationships besides the common one-to- 
many type. 

There are also many-to-many relation¬ 
ships. Again, both relational and Codasyl 


Smart forms: What electronic forms do 
that desk top publishing can’t. 

It’s the difference between making forms with a computer and using forms on a computer. 



S12 


COMPUTERWORLD 


AUGUST 10,1987 


















DBMS 


systems can handle these, since, even 
though Codasyl systems were designed 
specifically for one-to-many relationships, 
a many-to-many relationship always 
breaks down into a pair of one-to-many 
relationships. 

A major point of difference arises be¬ 
tween the two types of systems when 
they confront a reasonably common but 
poorly understood type of relationship 
called a co-relationship. 

Co-relationships can be handled easily 
by relational systems, but not at all by Co¬ 
dasyl systems. The problem with a co-re¬ 
lationship, as far as data base manage¬ 
ment systems following the Codasyl 
model are concerned, is that it has no one- 
to-many aspect that will allow the Codasyl 
set structure for one-to-many relation¬ 


ships to be used. 

Relational systems, on the other hand, 
manage relationships by equating field 
values in related files, so that essentially 
any kind of relationship can be handled, 
one way or another. 

A richness of relationships 

This brings us to the essence of the differ¬ 
ence between Codasyl and relational data 
base management systems. Even though 
both systems permit the management of 
network data bases, the network data 
base in the relational case may be made up 
of files connected by a richer variety of re¬ 
lationships than in the Codasyl case. 

This richness and the resulting flexibil¬ 
ity has made it possible to design nonpro¬ 
cedural languages of immense power to 


manipulate relational data bases. The 
SQL language for DB2, which has been 
widely implemented in a variety of other 
relational systems as well, is the best ex¬ 
ample. Codasyl systems have no language 
that can compare. 

Cullinet has added a relational front 
end to its Codasyl IDMS system, calling 
the hybrid system IDMS/R. However, it 
does not permit the use of SQL, which is 
rapidly becoming the standard nonproce¬ 
dural data base language. 

With a nonprocedural language, you 
specify the processing required instead of 
constructing a routine to specify how it 
should be carried out. With relational sys¬ 
tems, the required processing routine is 
generated automatically from the specifi¬ 
cation in SQL. 


When the same information 
goes on several pages, you enter 
it only once. The system can 
automatically fill in standard in¬ 
formation like a customer’s 
address. 


J bu can pull data in from other 
files and export data for use with 
other applications. 


You can create help windows for 
each blank on a form. Then the 
F10 brings up a window with in¬ 
structions on what the company 
wants in that blank. 





You can set criteria for any field. 
The system alerts the user if the 
wrong type of data is entered — 
a letter where a number should 
be, for example. 


The form can do calculations. 
For instance, it can add total 
costs on a requisition order and 
automatically place the sum in 
the proper space below. 


To tell the smart form what to do 
with the data entered in each 
blank, you create a “form map" 
with software from Electronic 
Form Systems. It doesn't require 
programming skills; it’s less com¬ 
plex than a spreadsheet. 


J&; 




If the relational front end of IDMS/R 
does not permit the use of SQL, what does 
it do? It permits the use of views, some¬ 
thing that is easily possible with relational 
systems using the nonprocedural lan¬ 
guage SQL but not with Codasyl systems. 

With an SQL expression, you can spec¬ 
ify the construction and retrieval of what 
is essentially a new file formed from data 
in multiple files of the data base. If this 
new file is specified as a view (with SQL), 
it can then be used for further manipula¬ 
tion by SQL. This facility can be useful 
when a complex SQL expression is need¬ 
ed to construct the view, but only simple 
SQL expressions are needed to manipu¬ 
late it afterward. Without the view facili¬ 
ty, complex SQL expressions would be 
needed with every manipulation of the 
data involved. 

IDMS/R provides two facilities for 
handling views. One is the logical record 
facility that permits a view to be formed 
from a Codasyl data base. The other is 
automatic system facility (ASF), which 
permits a data base to be defined with files 
that are relations, with no need for Coda¬ 
syl set definitions for the one-to-many re- 


I DMS/R is fundamentally 
a Codasyl system with 
some facilities of a 
limited nature similar to those 
commonly found in relational 
systems. In contrast, DB2 is 
close to being a true 
relational system with all the 
flexibility that that entails. 


computer so most of that money 
goes right to the bottom line. You 
can store as many as 5,000 different 
forms on an IBM® microcomputer 
and an unlimited number on a 
mainframe. 

One insurance company projects 
annual savings of $1.8 million in 
warehousing costs alone. 

These savings are significant, but 
the visible costs of paper forms are 
only the tip of the iceberg. The hid¬ 
den costs can be ten, twenty, maybe 
fifty times greater. 

Hidden cost — 

Using the wrong form. 

There’s a Murphy’s law of forms: If 
the wrong form can be used, it will 
be. 

With electronic forms you can 
control who uses a form, which 
form they use, and what they use it 
for. 

You can restrict certain forms to 
certain people or departments. 

Nobody will confuse two forms 
that look alike. They request a form 
by name or number and that’s the 
form the computer gives them. 

When a form is revised, you sim¬ 
ply replace the old one with the new 
one in the computer. 

Hidden cost — The cost of 
running out. 

Right now, several people in your 
company have run out of a form 
they need. They’re wasting time 
looking for more. The missing form 
is also delaying revenue, slowing 
the whole financial pulse of your 
company. 

Electronic forms never run out. 
Supply always equals demand. One 
insurance company produces 


15,000 policies every night using 
electronic forms. They are never 
short a single policy page. 

Hidden cost — Forms 
obsolescence. 

Needs change, laws change, and 
suddenly a lot of your paper forms 
aren’t worth the paper they’re 
printed on. One bank estimates that 
out-of-date forms were costing 
them $35,000 per month. 

Electronic forms eliminate this 
waste entirely. When a form goes 
out of date, you just move it to an¬ 
other computer file and put the new 
one in its place. 

Hidden cost — Forms 
management and enforcement. 

With technology from Electronic 
Form Systems, the creation, man¬ 
agement and processing of every 
form in your company are brought 
into a single integrated system. 
You’ll get up-to-the-minute sum¬ 
maries of how many times a form 
has been used, how long since it 
was revised, what the current revi¬ 
sion looks like, and so forth. Bootleg 
forms disappear. 

Combine the power of forms 
and computers. 

The computer has given business 
paperless typing, paperless filing, 
and paperless mailing. No large 
company could afford to be without 
them today. 

Now the paperless form is here. 
And Electronic Form Systems offers 
proven hardware and software that 
are already working in hundreds of 
installations. It is the only fully inte¬ 
grated system capable of handling 
forms creation, forms management, 
and forms processing. You can im¬ 


plement it as a centralized system 
based on your IBM mainframe or as 
a distributed system using IBM mi¬ 
crocomputers. You don’t have to re¬ 
write your applications software to 
use it, and it works with several dif¬ 
ferent makes of printer. 

Electronic forms. They do every¬ 
thing your paper ones do. Without 
the paperwork. 

Send for free information. Call 
1-800 FORM-FREE. Or fill out the 
coupon below. 


Send me more information on 
electronic forms. 

Name_ 

Title_ 

Company- 


Type of business 

Address- 

City_ 

State _ 

Phone_ 


Zip 


Complete and mail to: 

Electronic Form Systems 
2395 Midway Rd. 

Carrollton, TX 75006 

ATTN: EFS Marketing Manager 

Or call 1-800 FORM-FREE c 


ELECTRONIC 

FORM 

SYSTEMS™ 

EFS, ” A Product ot Computer Language Research, Inc. 


IBM is a registered trademark of International Business Machines. Lotus is a registered trademark of Lotus Development Corporation. 


lationships. This type of ASF-relational 
data base is manipulated procedurally 
within a program and can be manipulated 
nonprocedural^ at a terminal in a re¬ 
stricted fashion by Cullinet’s Online Que¬ 
ry. 

In summary, IDMS/R is fundamentally 
a Codasyl system with some facilities of a 
limited nature similar to those commonly 
foupd in relational systems. In contrast, 
DB2 is close to being a true relational sys¬ 
tem with all the flexibility that that en¬ 
tails. Nevertheless, both can handle a net¬ 
work-structured data base whose files are 
connected by common one-to-many rela¬ 
tionships. 

It might look from this discussion that 
DB2 is undisputedly the better system. 
However, “better” is a subjective term, 
and it would be wise to ask, “better for 
what?” 

There is no doubt DB2 rests on a supe¬ 
rior foundation. However, this superior 
foundation and the powerful facilities in 
DB2 take their toll when it comes to ordi¬ 
nary transaction processing. For process¬ 
ing simple transactions with only a few 
data base files connected by the common 
one-to-many relationships, DB2 is cur¬ 
rently significantly slower than IDMS/R, 
mainly because of the sheer amount of 
DB2 code that has to be executed per 
transaction. 

Thus, for ordinary transaction pro¬ 
cessing with ordinary data bases, IDMS/ 
R will do the job and do it very well. DB2 
will do things that are either very difficult 
or even impossible with IDMS/R, such as 
nonprocedural manipulation involving off¬ 
beat relationships. If that is what you re¬ 
quire, then DB2 is indeed the better sys¬ 
tem. • 


AUGUST 10,1987 


COMPUTERWORLD 


S13 































DBMS 



Tracking the nation's trees, bees and bears 

BY JOSH BRACKETT 


If you work for the National Park 
Service at any one of its 337 
sites in the U.S. and you have 
termites, you can use the ser¬ 
vice’s central data base manage¬ 
ment system to get rid of them. 


After you log on to Common, 
as the system is called, and 
choose Pest Management from 
the menu, you answer a branch¬ 
ing series of questions the sys¬ 
tem uses to diagnose such prob¬ 


lems. After pinpointing the 
problem, Common suggests an 
environmentally benign solu¬ 
tion, if there is one. If there isn’t 
one, or if the solution suggested 
doesn’t work, you can use the 


system to request permission to 
apply a pesticide. 

The idea for the Common sys¬ 
tem, according to Anne Fron- 
dorf, program analyst in the Nat¬ 
ural Resources and Environment 


What’s the Score in 
Data Path Management? 


. i vv s,-' ; v ■?;*... : v' 

V: v ; : >’ >-* : .A 

Data 

Switch 

^awarag^ 

Other 

Q Is the vendor able to offer complete Data Path 
Management systems including computer 
matrix switching, data communications matrix 
switching, performance measurement, and 
channel extension systems? 

Yes 

ft1 >< 

El Can the vendor provide a central, multi-user 
** control system that manages all the data 
paths in your network? 

Yes 

' v ‘ 

n In computer switching, does the vendor offer 
a choice between a single cross point module 
(1 xl) architecture and a full-featured switch 
including test I/O, channel activity monitoring, 
and integrated channel extension? 

Yes 


El How many switching systems has the vendor 
installed? 

4,500-F 


n Does the vendor provide a full range of fiber- 
optic channel extension systems that separate 
computers and control units at distances from 

2 to over 60 miles? 

Yes 


Can the vendor deliver a proven distributed 
communications matrix switch that offers a 
fully operational non-blocked 2,048-port 
capability with integrated performance 
monitoring— and back up its claims with over 

200 units shipped? 

Yes 


n Are manual patching and switching products 
also available for smaller applications? 

Yes 


H ls the vendor able to offer an affordable, 

"" industry-accepted network performance 
monitoring system that provides extensive 
performance, utilization, and availability 
information for all levels of your network, 
including up to 255 software applications and 
sub-applications? 

Yes 


El How large is the vendor’s own nationwide 
service organization? 

75 


EK1 Does the vendor offer remote diagnostic 
centers in the United States and Europe? 

Yes 



The combination of Data Switch and 
T-Bar has created the most advanced line 
of end-to-end Data Path Management 
systems available in the world. 

What is Data Path Management? 

Data Path Management is the discipline 
by which you organize, plan, and control 
your information processing resources 
from central computers to remote termi¬ 
nals. Our families of integrated computer 
and communications switches, perfor¬ 
mance monitoring systems, fiber-optic 
channel extenders, and control systems 
can help you manage your resources to 
deliver the best possible service to your 
users—efficiently and with the best price/ 
performance. 

The largest dedicated service 
organization in our markets. 

At Data Switch, we back up our Data 
Path Management solutions with the 
largest, most experienced in-house ser¬ 
vice and technical support organization in 
our markets. Our Data Path Management 
Specialists work with you from configura¬ 
tion planning through implementation to 
ensure continuous data path reliability 
and availability. 

Join our family of over 1,500 users. 

Data Switch’s complete, total Data Path 
Management capability is unmatched in 
the marketplace. System compatibility 
allows you to start with one Data Path 
Management solution and add more 
capabilities as your network expands. Add 
up the score for yourself. Then call us for 
more information at 1 >800-328-3279; in 
Connecticut, 926-1801. Or write: 

Data Switch Corporation, Dept. 20, 

One Enterprise Drive, Shelton, 
Connecticut 06484. 


dataH 

I f i am iTr'i"" 18 
I3WI (nil 


IcoRPOfi-iu: 'ti 


DATA SWITCH 
T-BAR 
INTELLINET 
CHANNELNET 


The Data Path Management 
Company 


office in Washington, D.C., 
stemmed from her office’s desire 
to collect all of the valuable man¬ 
agement data tucked away in 
separate files and data bases at 
Park Service locations. 

At the same time, park staff 
wanted a way to exchange data 
about their projects, problems 
and special resources. 

Resource roundup 

The national data base system 
Frondorf and others envisioned 
would provide regional and ser¬ 
vicewide data summaries and 
cross-disciplinary reports com¬ 
bining, for instance, a park’s bud¬ 
get information, acreage num¬ 
bers, plant and animal 
observation data, visitor statis¬ 
tics and the name of the local 
congressman. 

Parts of the system were pro¬ 
totyped on the Park Service’s 
Hewlett-Packard Co. 3000, us¬ 
ing Image, HP’s data base man¬ 
agement software. It quickly be¬ 
came evident, however, that 
Image, a transaction-oriented, 
hierarchical system, was not de¬ 
signed to handle unanticipated, 
cross-disciplinary queries. 

At that time, the spring of 
1985, there were not many truly 
relational DBMSs available for 
the HP 3000, however. The 
Park Service quickly narrowed 
the field to Relate/3000, sold by 
Computer Representative, Inc. 
in Santa Clara, Calif. 

Richard Thorson, now sys¬ 
tems analyst for the State of Vir¬ 
ginia, worked as a consultant for 
the Park Service during the 
search. He recalls that the speci¬ 
fications called for a report-gen¬ 
eration language that would al¬ 
low users to generate ad hoc 
reports on-line and store them 
for future use, a fourth-genera¬ 
tion language for quick applica¬ 
tion development and the capa¬ 
bility to access all of the parks’ 
existing Image files. 

Relate/3000 was installed in 
August, and the first two depart¬ 
mental data bases, containing 
basic park and natural resources 
data, were up and running by De¬ 
cember. It takes about three 
months to add a new data base 
module. Although the Park Ser¬ 
vice does not endorse products, 
they seem to be well satisfied 
with Relate/3000. 

Recently, the Park Service 
produced, for the first time, a 
comprehensive report on the 
status of flora and fauna in all of 
its parks — their condition, 
threats to their well-being and 
the money and personnel avail¬ 
able to address those threats. 
This report will provide the doc¬ 
umentation necessary for future 
budget authorizations. 

Best of all, Frondorf says, 
“This is not a static, one-time re¬ 
port.” The data on which the re¬ 
port is based is being updated 
constantly. • 


S14 


COMPUTERWORLD 


Brackett is a free-lance business and 
technical writer based in Rockport, 
Mass. 


AUGUST 10,1987 


































DBMS 


SPOTLIGHT 


Visual interfaces: Easy 
shopping but no browsing 


BY JAMES LARSON 


Nonprocedural data base languages, such 
as SQL, allow data base users to describe 
what data the data base management sys¬ 
tem should access without having to ex¬ 
plain how the DBMS should do it. There 
are, however, some drawbacks from 
which nonprocedural data base languages 
suffer. Users must learn and remember 
the exact language syntax as well as the 
names and relationships of the object 
types in the data base. Browsing through 
the data base requires repeatedly formu¬ 
lating and executing complete requests. 

The possibilities for overcoming these 
drawbacks include the use of visual inter¬ 
faces and natural languages. 

One method for helping users learn 
and remember the language syntax and 
names of data base objects is for the 
DBMS to display a syntax diagram, a 
graph whose nodes represent key words 
and options from the language, and a 
schema, a graph showing the names and 
relationships of the types of objects in the 
data base. A syntactically valid command 
is formed when a user selects a route 
through the syntax diagram and one or 
more of the objects from the schema. 

This approach to query formulation is 
not yet widely available. However, with 
increased use of sophisticated worksta¬ 
tions and bit-mapped screens, it may soon 
become a viable option. 


ventions to remember than with SQL. 

Browsing a data base with QBE or 
forms is not so simple, however. The user 
must repeatedly formulate and execute 
requests rather than navigate through 
the data base in a smooth sweep. 

Browsing consists of four basic opera¬ 
tions: structuring, filtering, panning and 


zooming. Structuring is choosing the or¬ 
ganization of the objects to be displayed. 
In either method, users have little struc¬ 
turing capability because the forms have 
usually been designed already. In QBE, 
for example, the user can specify only the 
columns of the tables displayed. 

Filtering is the process of selecting in¬ 
stances of the objects to be examined. 
Form systems can be used to retrieve rec¬ 
ords containing specified field values, pos¬ 
sibly even for ranges of values but seldom 
for arbitrarily complex conditions. QBE 
permits users to enter specifications con¬ 
sisting of simple Boolean conditions, but 
arbitrary combinations of Boolean condi¬ 
tions are difficult to specify. 

Panning is the scrolling or paging of 
object instances onto the screen. Both 


QBE and forms systems support panning. 

Zooming permits the user to proceed 
from record to record in an ad hoc man¬ 
ner, familiarizing him with the contents of 
the data base and allowing him to zero in 
on desired information without repeated¬ 
ly formulating and executing data base 
commands. Neither QBE nor forms sys¬ 
tems support zooming. 

However, several experimental data 
base interfaces do allow the user to zoom 
in or out to view object instances at sever¬ 
al levels of detail. The fact that approxi¬ 
mations of this capability have begun to 
appear in Apple Computer, Inc.’s Macin¬ 
tosh applications using windows offers 
hope that true browsing facilities for data 
base management systems will soon ma¬ 
terialize. • 


From OUTSIDE CICS: 

Multiple Region Monitoring 
ithaSim 


wit 


S ingle Terminal! 



for CICS 


Query-by-Example 

One of the most popular visual interfaces 
to data bases is Query-by-Example 
(QBE). With QBE, a user selects the 
names of the files to be accessed from a 
menu. The skeleton of a table, containing 
the name of the file and the name of each 
field in the file, appears on the screen for 
each selected file. The user then indicates 
which records to select, the criteria for 
joining, or coordinating, records and 
which fields are to be displayed by enter¬ 
ing the values and symbols directly onto 
the table skeletons. 

A popular variation of QBE is a form in¬ 
terface to data bases. A form contains the 
same information as a table skeleton, ar¬ 
ranged in a format similar to paper forms 
used in many offices. 

Users may use a form for either data 
entry or data retrieval. When entering 
data, values are inserted into the blank 
slots of the form. When data is being re¬ 
trieved, the blanks are filled with values of 
selected records. Values from each rec¬ 
ord are displayed on a single form, so the 
user may page through a set of forms to 
view multiple records from the data base. 

When using QBE or forms systems, it 
is possible, by moving a cursor across the 
table skeletons or forms, to enter data-re- 
trieval specifications in any convenient 
order. There are also fewer syntax con- 


Larson is manager of a project to build a user inter¬ 
face management system for an engineering infor¬ 
mation system at Honeywell, Inc.’s Corporate Sys¬ 
tems Development Division in Golden Valley, Minn. 
He is the author of Tutorial on Data Base Man¬ 
agement, published by IEEE Computer Society 
Press. 


1. NEW! 

Simultaneously Monitor All 
Your CICS Regions. 

The Monitor runs as a 
VTAM task in its own ad¬ 
dress space. It automatically 
pinpoints all stressed or 
hung regions at a glance. 

And 

you can monitor all your 
CICS regions simultaneously 
on one screen! 


2. NEW! 

Intervene In CICS Crises 
Quickly and Easily. 

Even locked regions can't 
stop the Monitor now—It's 
totally independent of CICS! 
With just a few keystrokes, 
you can find and cancel 
problem tasks. 

Menus and help screens 
guide your analyses to make 
crisis intervention quick and 
easy! 


3. FREE! 

Get a 30-day trial In your 
shop. 

Compare the new Monitor 
with the CICS performance 
monitor you have now! 

Call 800-227-8911 for a 
free, 30-day trial (in VA 
703-922-7101). 

(New features available for 
MVS/SP or XA only.) 


DONT TAKE OUR WORD FOR IT: 



When CICS crashes, I 
get the heat. With the new 
Monitor I can spot prob¬ 
lems fast. I just look for 
the red line, go right to the 
problem, and fix it. 

Dennis Conley 
Computer Data Systems, Inc. 

Sr. Systems Programmer 
Rockville, Maryland 



Now Serving Over 1500 Sites Worldwide! 


International Agents in: 

Australia/New Zealand—Optimum Software Japan—K.K. Ashisuto 
Benelux—Emerald Software Int'l BV Scandinavia—WSA Scandinavia 

France—Technologies Systems Southeast Asia infotech Consultants 

Germany—Emerald Software Int'l GmbH Switzerland/Austria—Performance Software 

Israel—SITAV Software Ltd. United Kingdom—Systems Resources Ltd. 

Italy—Software Technology Wnezuela-ENIAC, C.A. 


The Monitor for CICS is the most powerful CICS 
performance monitor on the market today. It runs 
online or batch, aids in debugging transactions in test 
or production, and even monitors tasks as they run. It 
also supports 4GLs and DBMSs, and eliminates 
dependency on CMF and CICSPARS/MVS! 

Call 800-227-8911 or clip the coupon below today! 


Landmark Systems Corporation 
6551 Loisdale Court 
Springfield, VA 22150 


lul 






■ ■1 



■'mmr i 


sU ■ 5 wB5i 


□ Please send more information □ Please send free 30 day trial 

□ Please send the Datapro Report on the Monitor for CICS 

□ I'm interested in attending a free seminar on 
The Monitor for CICS 


Name- 
Title_ 


Company- 
Address— 
City_ 


. St_ 


. Zip— 


Phone(- 


Operating System- 


S7W71 


AUGUST 10,1987 


COMPUTERWORLD 


S15 





























DBMS 


SPOTLIGHT 




VENDOR VIEWPOINT 

A full house is better 
than just one of a kind 


BY JOHN BIRCH 


The major advantage of a 
relational data base man- 
agement system is the 
gain in applications pro- 
Mrfltm grammer productivity, 
which has been reported to be two to five 
times better than with traditional 
DBMSs. My own experience with rela¬ 
tional data bases supports these claims. 
Not only are these gains found when writ¬ 
ing new applications, but they are even 
greater when modifying existing relation¬ 
al DBMS applications. 

What are not often discussed, howev¬ 
er, are the particular procedures that 
must be followed — especially with DB2, 
the most-publicized relational data base 
product — to realize a net improvement. 

Although most users would like to, few 
have production on-line transaction pro¬ 
cessing applications running on IBM’s 
DB2 today. This is because while relation¬ 
al data base systems complement conver¬ 
sational transaction processors such as 
TSO and CMS very well, they are not a 
natural match with pseudoconversational 
transactions such as those in IMS and 
CICS. 

Fundamental differences 

Implementing a new CICS transaction 
processing application for DB2 is easier 
than implementing the same application 
for a traditional DBMS, because a rela¬ 
tional DBMS truly isolates the application 
program from the physical organization of 
the data. There are, however, fundamen¬ 
tal differences between a relational data 
base and a traditional data base. 

To begin with, DB2 is set, or multiple- 
record, oriented, and applications should 
be designed with sets of records, not sin¬ 
gle records. If not, poor performance and 
high-system usage will result, because it 
will be necessary to introduce complex 
logic into the application program, and 
DB2 will unnecessarily repeat a number 
of data retrievals. 

The same principal applies to conver¬ 
sion of existing applications. The worst 
thing you can do is take an existing appli¬ 
cation that is single-record oriented and 
simply replace every VS AM read/write 
call or DL/1 call with a DB2 SQL state¬ 
ment. The processing overhead de¬ 
scribed above will take place for each rec¬ 
ord requested, causing the application 
runtime to increase enormously. 

Instead of trying what many people 
mistakenly think is the easy way into 
DB2, it is best to face up to the necessity 
of a redesign, which may involve changes 
to data and key structures, as well as ap¬ 
plication program logic. While you will 
have to think differently about how you 
access the data, the net improvement in 
performance will be worth the effort. 

A second major point of difference is 
that relational DBMSs do not use physical 
pointers to navigate through the data but 


use the values in the data fields. 

Data modeling is important no matter 
what kind of data base is used, but it be¬ 
comes almost mandatory when a relation¬ 
al data base system is used in a transaction 
processing environment. In the case of 


DB2, data modeling is critical because 
DB2 does not currently deal with referen¬ 
tial integrity, which is a serious data in¬ 
tegrity problem. Until IBM corrects this 
situation, as it has publicly promised it will 
in a future release, it is up to the user to 
remember to build referential integrity 
checks into the application code. 

DB2 does have an optimizer that auto¬ 
matically optimizes data retrieval. How¬ 
ever, if the data definition step is not giv¬ 
en proper attention, no optimizer can fix 
inefficient physical data storage. 

If you have a traditional DBMS such as 
IMS already in use, converting its applica¬ 
tions to run on DB2 may not be cost effec¬ 
tive. A more reasonable strategy is to 
continue to use the traditional DBMS for 
high-volume production applications and 


use DB2 for ad hoc queries and reports, 
which is a natural fit. 

IBM provides a data-extract program 
that allows users to selectively extract 
data from IMS data bases, VS AM files and 
sequential files and copy them into DB2 
tables. Once you have put this data into 
DB2 tables, you can easily write applica¬ 
tions that properly use DB2 functions, 
such as set processing. 

Obviously, having two DBMSs is not 
an ideal situation. However, since DB2 
and other relational data bases combine 
better programmer productivity with 
high system resource consumption, a 
two-pronged DBMS strategy may be the 
only practical approach for installations 
with high-volume transaction processing 
applications accessing large data bases. • 


Birch is a corporate vice-president of McCormack 
& Dodge Corp. 


Text Information Management System 

BASIS was the first software system 
developed specifically for the storage 
and retrieval of large volumes of textual 
information. Today, with over 800 instal¬ 
lations worldwide, BASIS remains the 
ultimate Text Information Management 
System (TIMS) available. Anywhere. 

Design flexibility makes BASIS 
software the ideal TIMS for 
diverse information manage¬ 
ment needs. 

From the boardroom, to the newsroom, 
BASIS’ modular design offers flexibility 
in tailoring the application to the need. 
Which is why BASIS has helped auto¬ 
mate corporate and technical libraries, 
research and development projects, 
law offices, government departments 
and agencies, financial and insurance 
companies, publishing concerns, edu¬ 
cational institutions, manufacturing 
companies, and primary resource 
industries. 

In fact, there really isn’t much BASIS 
can’t do when it comes to text infor¬ 
mation management. BASIS’ system 
provides fast, efficient access to textual 
and numeric data in its databases for 
accurate and timely reporting. 


BASIS ENABLES TEXT AND 
DATA RETRIEVAL FROM 
A GROWING WORLD OF 
INFORMATION. SIMPLY. 
QUICKLY. EFFICIENTLY. 


BASIS is designed to keep pace 
with your world of information, 
and, without the constraint of 
hardware dependence. 

Because BASIS is portable, your applica¬ 
tions can run on many computers, 
minimizing your hardware dependency 
as applications increase in size.. an 
important consideration when you are 
evaluating software for your text infor¬ 
mation management needs. 

As sophisticated as BASIS may 
seem, it remains a system that 
is simple to use. 

Fast, efficient information retrieval is 
possible in even the largest databases. 
BASIS uses “fast path” indexing tech¬ 
niques, providing a simple, yet powerful 
query facility that makes complex 
searching easy. Novice and casual users 
may retrieve information and generate 
reports using menus and simplified 
command statements. Advanced users 
may compose freeform query statements 
and generate ad hoc reports using the 
English-like query and data manipula¬ 
tion language. BASIS’ help facility 
operates at three levels of expertise— 
beginner, advanced and expert so you 
always have immediate access to 
assistance. 


■o I9K7 


S16 


COMPUTERWORLD 


AUGUST 10,1987 













































DBMS 


SPOTLIGHT 


VENDOR VIEWPOINT 

Higher purposes for data dictionaries 

BY L. JEANNE FRIEDMAN 

The basic purpose of a data 
dictionary is to inventory 
and manage corporate 
data. MIS organizations 
have long used this struc¬ 
ture to tackle such tasks as data control 
and administration. However, data dictio¬ 
naries have more to offer than just anoth¬ 
er level of control or administration. They 
can be a key to information integrity and 



productivity gains in application develop¬ 
ment. 

Data dictionaries inherited a new cor¬ 
porate role in the early 1980s when the 
position of data administrator came into 
vogue. Managing information as a corpo¬ 
rate resource became the new mission, 
and the data dictionary became the tool 
for analyzing as well as collecting corpo¬ 
rate data. 


In order to fill that role and make good 
on their promise of dramatic gains in pro¬ 
grammer productivity, data dictionaries 
must, however, offer not only an inven¬ 
tory of data elements and tables but also 
the tools for defining the data and the 
business or application rules that operate 
on the data. What is more, they must 
make this information automatically avail¬ 
able to all applications using the data. 



BASIS systems are easily imple¬ 
mented, becoming quickly pro¬ 
ductive. And, that makes sense. 

One of the best benefits of selecting 
BASIS for your TIMS is the ease with 
which BASIS can be implemented and 
tailored to your existing applications 
environment. And, as many MIS/DP 
managers have discovered, BASIS even 
provides applications opportunities for 
end users, thanks to BASIS’ fully inte¬ 
grated applications development facili¬ 
ties. Once implemented, BASIS 
databases are easily modified without 
disrupting systems operations. New files 
and record fields may be added or 
changed without reloading data. 

BASIS is accurate, efficient, 
and secure. 

Password protection and privilege code 
access secure BASIS installations at the 
database, index, record and field levels, 
to satisfy the most particular confiden¬ 
tiality requirements of your databases. 



BASIS TEXT INFORMATION 
MANAGEMENT SYSTEM. 
HIGH TECH. IN TOUCH. 
VERY USER-FRIENDLY. 


DM is the first relational DBMS with 
full-text handling capabilities integrated 
with complete database management 
facilities. DM provides superior integrity 
constraints, security features and maxi¬ 
mum data independence for program¬ 
mer independence in DBMS 
applications. 

BASIS and DM are both products 
from the minds of Information 
Dimensions, Inc., a subsidiary 
ofBattelle—since 1929, the 
preeminent independent 
research facility in the world. 

This proud heritage is your assurance 
the BASIS and DM systems are truly 
representative of the most innovative 
development in software technologies 
available for TIMS and DBMS applica¬ 
tions. And, Information Dimensions 
provides a network of marketing, tech¬ 
nical services and systems support, with 
offices and personnel worldwide. 


If you like what BASIS can do 
for TIMS, then you’ll love 
what DM® can do for DBMS. 


If you need to know who, what, 
where, when, or why... then call 
Information Dimensions, NOW. 

CALL TOLL-FREE 
1-800-DATA MGT 

In Ohio, call collect 
(614) 761-7300 




Information 
Dimensions , Inc. 

a BATTELLE Subsidiary 

655 Metro Place South 
Dublin, Ohio 


BASIS and DM are registered trademarks of Information Dimensions, Inc. 


A data dictionary holding application- 
specific information in this manner can 
lend tremendous power to an application 
generator. It allows the generator to use 
the information in generating a customi¬ 
zable prototype of an application while 
maintaining the integrity of the business 
rules defined in the dictionary. 

If the data dictionary is a vital part of a 
data base management system, the rules 
defined for the dictionary can be con¬ 
trolled, managed and optimized for per¬ 
formance by the DBMS. This integration 
leads to the largest gains in application 
productivity and data integrity, because 
the rules are enforced by the DBMS 
wherever they apply, such as in interac¬ 
tive applications, queries and Cobol pro¬ 
grams. 

Taking full advantage 

In addition to data descriptions — such as 
data element names, sizes and types 
grouped by data tables — that have tradi¬ 
tionally been collected in data dictio¬ 
naries, the following information needs to 
be defined for a dictionary to take advan¬ 
tage of its power: 

• Presentation attributes. These re¬ 
fer to information on how data is present¬ 
ed to the user in an application, query or 
report and includes such items as default 
edit pictures and column headings. 

• Relationship information. Relation¬ 
al technology allows the DBMS to relate 
tables by data values. However, additional 
information regarding the relationship is 
of extreme value to applications. For ex¬ 
ample, a data dictionary could contain in¬ 
formation describing the relationship be¬ 
tween a department and an employee, 
such as whether the employee is a depart¬ 
ment member or manager or is on loan to 
the department. This information sets the 
stage for an application generator to cre¬ 
ate a much more intelligent application. 

• Relationship rules or referential 
integrity. One casualty of the demise of 
older data base storage technologies is 
the data on relationships that was built 
into the DBMS itself. The data dictionary 
needs to provide a means for specifying 
relationship rules, such as “do not allow 
the department to be deleted if there are 
related employees” or “keep the employ¬ 
ees if the department is deleted.” 

• Validation conditions. The data dic¬ 
tionary should apply the same validation 
criteria, such as range checks or lists of 
acceptable values, whenever a data entity 
is added or updated, regardless of the ap¬ 
plication. In addition, the data dictionary 
should allow the user to specify multiple- 
field validation algorithms within and 
across tables. 

• Calculations or derived data. This is 
an important area for achieving data in¬ 
tegrity and productivity in application de¬ 
velopment and maintenance. Many data 
fields in a data base are basically holding 
tanks for calculations. For example, sala¬ 
ry in an employee table is usually the re¬ 
sult of a calculation involving hours 
worked and rate of pay, while order 
amount in a customer-order table is the 
sum of line-item amounts, which are cal¬ 
culations involving price, quantity and 
possibly discounts. 

The new data dictionary must accom¬ 
modate such calculations so they are per¬ 
formed consistently every time an appli¬ 
cation program calls for the result. • 


Friedman is senior product manager of data base 
and decision-support product planning and manage¬ 
ment at Wang Laboratories, Inc. 


AUGUST 10,1987 


COMPUTERWORLD 


S17 





































DBMS 


SPOTLIGHT 


Mini/mainframe DBMS 


COMPANY 

PRODUCT NAME 

OPERATING SYSTEM(S) 

TYPE OF APPROACH 

QUERY LANGUAGE(S) USED 

SUPPORTS CONCURRENT 

PROCESSING 

ACCESS CONTROL TO 

WHAT LEVEL 

INCLUDES A 

DATA DICTIONARY 

DATA BASE ADMINISTRATOR 

UTILITIES PROVIDED 

INCLUDES FACILITY FOR 

DOWNLOADING TO PCs 

PERFORMS DATA TRANSFER 

WITH WHICH DBMSs 

PRICE 

Amperif Corp. 

(818) 998-7666 

RDM1100 

Unisys 1100 

Exec 

Relational 

RQL 

Yes 

Data item level 

No 

Data base dump and load, 
user 

identification/authorization, 
bulk load 

No 

Yes (with custom 
program) 

$280,000- 

$300,000 

Applications Software, Inc. 
(714)891-2616 

Interrogate 

MVS, IMS 
DB/DC, CICS 

Flat, hierarchical, 
relational to DB2 

Proprietary, SQL 

Yes 

Value level 

Yes 

Utilities for archival 
purposes, nature of tracking 
for DASD storage and library 
usage by date and volume, 
determines active terminals 
and simultaneous sessions 

Yes 

SAS, Focus, 
Ramis 

Contact vendor 

Applied Data Research, Inc. 
(201) 874-9000 

ADR Datacom 

OS, VM/VS, 

VSE, VM/CMS 

Relational 

ADR/Data Query 
(proprietary) 

Yes 

Field level 

Yes 

ADR/Ideal, ADR/Data 
Dictionary, ADR/Data Query 

Yes 

VSAM, Total, 
DL/1, IMS/DB 

From $114,500 

Bradmark Computer 

Systems, Inc. 

(713) 621-2808 

DB-General 

Any HP 3000 
operating system 

Relational 

Fortran 

Yes 

Any level 

No 

Capacity changes, structural 
changes, performance 
monitoring 

No 

Image, Turbo 
Image 

$3,500-$6,500 

Britton Lee, Inc. 

(408) 378-7000 

BL8000 series 

Hardware-based 
data base system 

Relational 

SQL 

Yes 

SQL level 

Yes 

25 utilities included 

Yes 

Standard PC data 
bases 

From $320,000 

BL700 series 

Hardware-based 
data base system 

Relational 

SQL 

Yes 

SQL level 

Yes 

25 utilities included 

Yes 

Standard PC data 
bases 

From $125,000 

BL300 series 

Hardware-based 
data base system 

Relational 

SQL 

Yes 

SQL level 

Yes 

25 utilities included 

Yes 

Standard PC data 
bases 

From $17,000 

BRS Information 

Technologies 

(800)235-1209 

BRS/Search 

VMS, Unix, 

MVS, VM/CMS 

Inverted file 
structure 

Proprietary 

Yes 

Field level 

No 

Add users, create menus, 
performance monitoring and 
security 

No 


$20,000- 

$115,000 

CRI, Inc. 

(408) 980-9898 

Relate/DB 

MPE, AOS/VS, 
VMS, Unix 

Relational 

Proprietary 

Yes 

User, file, field, 
record levels 

No 

— 

Yes 

Image, Infos, 
others 

$15,000- 

$110,000 

Campus America, Inc. 
(615)523-9506 

Raise DMS-Plus 

VMS, RSTS 

Relational 

Proprietary 

Yes 

Screen-level 

security 

Yes 

Data base creation and 
modification, screen 
formating, report generators 

Yes 

Any 

$19,500-$25,000 

Century Analysis, Inc. 

(415) 680-7800 

Mbase/9 

VRX, VRX/E 

Relational 

Proprietary 

Yes 

Record level 

Yes 

Interactive dictionary 
creation and maintenance, 
dictionary analysis by 
element and subset 

Yes 

Works with all 
NCR file 
techniques, 

DBSR 

$25,000 

Cincom Systems, Inc. 
(513)662-2300 

Supra 

MVS/XA, 

DOS/VSE, 

VM/CMS 

Advanced 
relational, three- 
schema 
architecture 

Spectra 

Yes 

Row level, every 
attribute within 
the row 

Yes 

Normal for automatic logical 
and physical data base design, 
DB Aid for view creation and 
testing, directory 
maintenance 

Yes 

VSAM, IMS, 
Total, Supra 

PDM 

From $196,000 

Ultra 

VMS 

Relational 

Spectra 

Yes 

Row level, every 
attribute within 
the row 

Yes 

Directory maintenance, DB 
Aid, Fast Utilities 

No 

RMS files 

From $20,000 

Cognos 

(800) 426-4667 

Powerhouse 

MVS, VMS, 
AOS/VS 

Relational 

SQL, proprietary 

Yes 

Data item level 

Yes 

Data base creation, 
organization 

No 

VAX/RDB, 
DGS/QL, Infos, 
VAX/RMS, 
KSAM, MPE, 
Image 

Contact vendor 

CompuServe Data 

Technologies 

(617)661-9440 

System 1032 

VAX/VMS 

Relational-like 

Proprietary 

Yes 

Field, record, 
procedural, data 
set levels 

Yes 

Record descriptors, security 
provisions, damage recovery 

Yes 

““ 

$3,000-$120,000 

System 1022 

TOPS-IO, TOPS- 
20 

Inverted file, 
relational-like 

Proprietary 

Yes 

DBMS, data, 
value levels 

Yes 

Accounting, security, host- 
language interface 

Yes 

None 

$16,000-$72,000 

Computer Associates 
International, Inc. 

(617) 685-1400 

CA-Universe 

MVS, DOS, VM 

Relational 

SQL, QUEL 

Yes 

Value level 

Yes 

Restart, recovery, backup 

Yes 

Through CA-Earl 
to Adabas, Total, 
IDMS, DL/1, 

IMS 

$140,000- 

$170,000 

Computer Corp. of America 
(800)258-4100 

Model 204 

MVS/XA, MVS, 
VM/CMS 
(including IBM 
9370), any OS 
operating system 

Relational 

Proprietary 

Yes 

Field-level 

security 

Yes 

On-line performance 
monitor, add and modify files 
on-line, backup of files during 
update 

Yes 

Any processor 
running under 
CICS or VM 

$30,000- 

$200,000 

Concurrent Computer Corp. 
(800) 631-2154 

Reliance Plus 

OS-32 

Relational 

RQL 

Yes 

Field level 

Yes 

Performance monitoring, 
asynchronous index 
restructuring 

Yes 

NA 

$3,000-$24,000 

Cullinet Software, Inc. 
(617)329-1134 

IDMS/SQL 

VMS 

Relational 

SQL 

Yes 

Data item level 

Yes 

On-line backup, log-level 
utilities, logical names 
creation 

No 

IDMS/R 

$5,000-$l 10,000 

IDMS/R 

MVS/XA, 
DOS/VSE/SP, 
VM/CMS ‘ 

Relational 

On-line query, 
supports forms or 
SQL syntax 

Yes 

Record level 

Yes 

Off-load/restore, roll 
forward/roll back, 
performance monitor 

Yes 

VSAM, Total, 
DL/1 

$67,000- 

$235,000 

Data General Corp. 

(800) 328-2436 

Infos II 

AOS/VS 

Hierarchical 

Present 

Yes 

Access control by 
user 

No 

Interactive data 
manipulation, incremental 
dump and load, data base 
recovery facility 

No 

Flat files, 

DG/DBMS, 

DG/SQL 

$215-$3,420 

DG/SQL 

AOS/VS 

Relational 

SQL, Present 

Yes 

Data item level 
and/or value level 

Yes 

Interactive data definition 
and manipulation, data base 
administration and 
performance monitoring 
utility 

No 

Flat files, INFOS 
II, DG/DBMS 

Contact vendor 

DG/DBMS 

AOS/VS 

Codasyl 

Present 

Yes 

Data item level 

Yes 

Interactive data definition 
and manipulation, integrity 
verification, statistic 
reporting 

No 

Flat files, INFOS 
II, DG/SQL 

Contact vendor 

Digital Equipment Corp. 

Contact local DEC sales office 

RDB, VAX/VMS 

VAX/VMS 

Relational 

Proprietary 

Yes 

Record level 

Yes 

Data manipulation, data 
maintenance commands 

Optional 

With optional 
features only 

$3,540-$56,050 

VAX DBMS 

VAX/VMS 

Codasyl 

Proprietary 

Yes 

Record level 

Yes 

Performance monitoring of 
statistics, dump facility 

Optional 

None 

$5,460-$86,450 


The companies included in this chart responded to a recent telephone survey conducted by Computer world. Further product information is available from vendors. 


S18 COMPUTERWORLD AUGUST 10,1987 




















































































DBMS 


SPOTLIGHT 


COMPANY 

PRODUCT NAME 

OPERATING SYSTEM(S) 

TYPE OF APPROACH 

QUERY LANGUAGE(S) USED 

SUPPORTS CONCURRENT 

PROCESSING 

ACCESS CONTROL TO 

WHAT LEVEL 

INCLUDES A 

DATA DICTIONARY 

DATA BASE ADMINISTRATOR 

UTILITIES PROVIDED 

INCLUDES FACILITY FOR 

DOWNLOADING TO PCs 

PERFORMS DATA TRANSFER 

WITH WHICH DBMSs 

PRICE 

Exact Systems 
& Programming Corp. 

(914) 285-9444 

DNA-4 

DG operating 
systems, RDOS, 
AOS, AOS/VS 

Relational 

Proprietary 

Yes 

Field level 

Yes 

File and record definition, 
display of data in data base as 
utility, development language 

No 

Infos 

$1,250-$36,000 

Financial Technologies 
International, Inc. 
(212)912-6300 

DB Aid for DBRC 

MVS 

NA 

Proprietary 

Yes 

— 

Yes 

Reporting, time-stamp 
utilities 

No 

IMS 

$15,000 

Fulcrum Technologies, Inc. 
(613)238-1761 

Fulcrum 

Ful/Text 

MVS, Unix, 
VAX/VMS, 
AOS/VS 

Inverted file 
structure 

None 

Yes 

Document level 

No 

Usage monitoring, document 
collection administration 

Yes 

NA 

$5,000-$50,000 

General Data Systems, Ltd. 
(215) 985-1780 

GDX 

Any IBM 3000 

series, 4300 

series and 

compatible 

mainframe 

operating 

systems 

Relational 

Proprietary 

Yes 

Field level 

Yes 

Full portability, performance 
monitoring and audit 
reporting, data dictionary 
cross-reference 

Yes 

IMS, VSAM 

$20,000- 

$150,000 

Gentry, Inc. 

(415) 547-6134 

PAL 

MPE, any 
operating system 
running on the 

HP 3000 

Relational 

Proprietary 

Yes 

Beyond field level 

Yes 


Yes 

Manman 

$7,700 

Harris Corp. 

(800) 442-7747 

Unify 

Unix 

Relational 

SQL 

Yes 

Data item level 

Yes 

User security, backup and 
transaction logging utilities, 
menu management 

Yes 

Any DBMS sup¬ 
porting SQL and 
flat file import 
utility 

Contact vendor 

Oracle 5.0 

Unix 

Relational 

SQL 

Yes 

Data item level 

Yes 

Oracle display system, audit¬ 
ing facility, data loader, after¬ 
image journaling 

Yes (Ver¬ 
sion 5.1) 

NA 

Contact vendor 

Henco Software, Inc. 

(617) 890-8670 

Info-DB Plus 

VAX/VMS 

Relational 

Proprietary 

Yes 

Data item level 

Yes 

Screen-based data dictionary, 
security, user profile editors, 
traditional DBMS with un¬ 
structured text fields 

No 

Native file struc¬ 
tures 

Contact vendor 

Hewlett-Packard Co. 

Contact local HP office 

Turbo Image 

MPE, MPE XL 

Network DBMS 

Query language 

Yes 

Data item level 

No 

Creates data bases and erases 
them, shows users of data 
base, restructuring 

Yes 

NA 

Contact vendor 

HP SQL 

HP-VX, MPE, 
MPE XL 

Relational 

ISQL 

Yes 

Data item level 

Yes 

SQL Util 

No 

NA 

$4,000-$15,000 

Allbase 

HP-UX, MPE, 
MPE UL 

Relational, net¬ 
work 

ISQL, IQuery 

Yes 

Data item level 

Yes 

Data base creation 

No 

NA 

$20,000-$30,000 

Honeywell Bull, Inc. 
(800)328-5111 ext. 99 

Multrics Rela¬ 
tional Data Store 

Multics 

Relational 

Proprietary 

Yes 

Table level 

No 

Restructuring capabilities, 
decentralized administration 

No 

None 

Contact vendor 

IDS/2 

GECOS 

Codasyl 

SQL, QRP/PLP 

Yes 

Physical record 
level 

Yes 

Save and restore, analysis 
utilities, restructuring and re¬ 
organization 

Yes 

I-D-S/2 in a mini¬ 
computer envi¬ 
ronment 

Contact vendor 

Interel 

GECOS 8 for In¬ 
terel 

Relational 

SQL 

Yes 

Any level 

Yes 

Load facilities, optimization 
utilities, access of nonrela¬ 
tional data with SQL 

Yes 

None 

$8,000-$14,000 

IBM 

Contact local IBM sales office 

DB2 

MVS/370, 

MVS/XA, 

MVS/TSO 

Relational 

SQL 

Yes 


Yes 

Recovery backup, on-line 

Help facilities, performance 
monitor 


IMS, VSAM 

Contact vendor 

IMS/VS-DB 

MVS/370, 

MVS/XA 

Hierarchical 

DL/1 

Yes 

Field level 

Yes 

Backup, recovery and reorga¬ 
nization utilities 

— 

VSAM, DB2 

Contact vendor 

Information Builders, Inc. 
(212)736-4433 

Focus 

VM, MVS, 
VAX/VMS, Inix, 
Wang VS 

Shared relational 

Proprietary 

Yes 

Record level 

Yes 

Report generator, dialogue 
manager, application devel¬ 
opment system 

Yes 

IMS, DB2, 
SQL/DS 

$43,000- 

$100,000 

Information Dimensions, Inc. 
(800) 328-2648 

DM 

VAX/VMS, Con¬ 
trol Data 

NOS/VE 

Relational 

Proprietary 

Yes 


Yes 

Report writer, language-in¬ 
dependent interface, Cobol 
and Fortran interface 

No 


$25,000-$43,500 

Information Structures, Inc. 
(303)293-2911 

Base/OE 

VAX/VMS, RSX 

Hierarchical 

Proprietary 

Yes 

Field level 

No 

— 

No 

None 

Contact vendor 

Informix Software, Inc. 

(415) 322-4100 

Informix SQL 

VMS, DOS, all 
Unix versions 

Relational 

SQL 

Yes 

Field level 

Yes 

Report writer, screen gener¬ 
ator, interactive schema edi¬ 
tor 

Yes 

Lotus’s 1-2-3 

Contact vendor 

Informix 4GL 

VMS, DOS, all 
Unix versions 

Relational 

SQL 

Yes 

Field level 

Yes 

Report writer, screen gener¬ 
ator, interactive schema edi¬ 
tor 

Optional 

None 

Contact vendor 

Intelligent Information 
Systems, Inc. 

(212) 966-4468 

IIS/Destiny 

VAX/VMS 

Hierarchical, re¬ 
lational, network 

Form-driven 

Yes 

Field level 

Yes 

Loader, dictionary report, 
automatic generation of file- 
maintenance utilities 

No 

Any RMS file 

$15,000-$50,000 

Interbase Software Corp. 

(617) 649-3977 

Interbase 

VAX/VMS, VAX- 
/Ultrix 

Relational, dis¬ 
tributed 

SQL, proprietary 

Yes 

Field, view levels 

Yes 

Backup utility, data base 
maintenance utility 

Yes 

RDB/VMS 

$15,000-$75,000 

International Parallel 

Machines 
(617) 990-2977 

IPDBMS 

IPOS (propri¬ 
etary) 

Relational 

Proprietary 

Yes 

Field level 

No 

Data base library 

Yes 

ISIS, Ingres 

Contact vendor 

MAI Basic Four, Inc. 

(714) 731-5100 

MAI Origin 

BOSS/IX, 

BOSS/VS 

Relational 

Query-by-Exam- 

ple 

Yes 

User-level securi¬ 
ty 

Yes 

Data item where used, file- 
/program cross-reference, 
data impact report 

Yes 

Any via fiat file 

$995-$10,900 

Microforms Trans-Lingual 
(612) 944-5951 

Dcare 

VMS, 

MVS/CICS, 
VM/CMS, MVS 
XA.CICS 

Relational 

Proprietary 

Yes 


Yes 


Yes 

Any DBMS 
through sequen¬ 
tial file listing 

$15,000 

Must Software International 
(203) 762-2511 

Nomad 2 

VM/CMS, 

MVS/TSO 

Relational, hier¬ 
archical 

Proprietary 

Yes 

Field level 

Yes 

Function to build data dictio¬ 
nary, data base check for 
fragmentation statistics 

Yes 

IMS, DB2, 
SQL/DS, IDMS 

$45,000- 

$120,000 

National Information 

Systems, Inc. 

(408) 257-7700 

Accent R 

TOPS-IO, TOPS- 
20, VMS 

Relational 

Proprietary 

Yes 

Any level 

Yes 

Performance monitoring, 
host-language interface 

Optional 

Through host- 

language inter¬ 
face only 

$4,000-$99,000 

Officesmiths, Inc. 
(613)235-6749 

The Officesmith 

Unix 

Hierarchical 

Proprietary 

Yes 

Field level 

Yes 

Report generator, screen 
generator, 4GL 

No 

Unify 

$5,000-$90,000 


AUGUST 10,1987 


COMPUTERWORLD 


S19 



























































DBMS 



COMPANY 

PRODUCT NAME 

OPERATING SYSTEM(S) 

TYPE OF APPROACH 

QUERY LANGUAGE(S) USED 

SUPPORTS CONCURRENT 

PROCESSING 

ACCESS CONTROL TO 

WHAT LEVEL 

INCLUDES A 

DATA DICTIONARY 

DATA BASE ADMINISTRATOR 

UTILITIES PROVIDED 

INCLUDES FACILITY FOR 

DOWNLOADING TO PCs 

PERFORMS DATA TRANSFER 

WITH WHICH DBMSs 

PRICE 

On-Line Software 
International, Inc. 

(800) 528-0272 

Ramis 

Information 

Systems 

DOS/VSE, 

MVS/XA, 

VM/CMS 

Relational 

SQL/DS 

Yes 

File level 

Yes 

Utilities program included 

Yes 

DB2.DL/1, 

IMS/VS, 

SQL/PS, Adabas, 
IDMS/R, Total 

$49,000- 

$115,000 

Oracle Corp. 

(800) 345-DBMS 

Oracle 

VM/CMS, MVS, 
VAX/VMS, 
VAX/Ultrix, Unix 
System V, 4.2 

Relational 

SQL, SQLForms, 
Query-by - 
Example 

Yes 

Data field level 

Yes 

SQLLoader for file 
conversion, SQLForms 4GL 
application generator, 
SQLConnect for interfacing 
to DB2 

Yes 

DB2, SQL/DS 

Contact vendor 

Prime Computer, Inc. 
(617)655-8000 

Prime 

Information 

Primos 

Distributed 

relational 

English structure 
for 4GL 

Yes 

Subvalue level 

Yes 

System tuning, security, 
backup ability 

Yes 

— 

$5,000-$35,000 

Prime Oracle 

Primos 

Relational 

SQL 

Yes 

Value level 

Yes 

Import/export for table 
backup and recovery, ODL 
for converting flat ASCH files 
in Prime Oracle tables, 
performance tuning 
capabilities; multitable 
clustering, indexing 

Yes 

DB2, SQL/DS 

$10,000-$80,000 

Public Office Corp. 

(202) 638-5999 

Session 

VAX/VMS 

Proprietary 

Proprietary 

Yes 

Data value level 

Yes 

Reorganization of data, 
evaluates data from foreign 
systems, reads any fixed- 
length tape, includes any data 
base 

Yes 

Any 

$8,200-$50,000 

Quodata Corp. 

(203) 728-6777 

QDMS-R 

VAX/VMS 

Relational 

Proprietary 

Yes 

Bit level 

Yes 

Report generator, screen- 
based administrative views 

Yes 

Powerhouse, 

RDB, DBMS/32 

From $12,000 

Relational Technology, Inc. 
(800) 4-INGRES 

Ingres 

Most Unix 
versions, MS- 
DOS, VM/CMS, 
ADC, PC-DOS, 
VAX/VMS, 

Ultrix 

Relational 

SQL, QUEL 

Yes 

Field, time, data, 
user levels 

Yes 

Cojoumaling/recovery/audit 
facilities, query cost, query 
plans, settable maximum cost 
query allowable, user- 
settable concurrency-control 
mechanisms 

Yes 

DB2, SQL/VS, 
RDB, IMS, RMS, 
Dbase III, Lotus’s 
1-2-3 

$5,000-$140,000 

Rhodnius, Inc. 

(416) 922-1743 

Empress 32 

VAX/VMS, Unix 

Relational 

SQL 

Yes 

Field level 

Yes 

Automatic data conversion, 
integration with non-data- 
base data 

Yes 

ASCII, fixed links, 
delimited files 

$9,000-$100,000 

Ruf Corp. 

(913) 782-8544 

IMPRS 

VAX/VMS, 

RSTS 

Relational 

Proprietary 

Yes 

Record level 

No 

— 

No 

— 

$10,000-$20,000 

SAS Institute, Inc. 

(919) 467-8000 

Data 

Management 

Software 

OS, CMS, 
DOS/VSE, NOS, 
OS-llOO 

Hierarchical 

Proprietary 

Yes 

Field level 

Yes 

Accounting log, rollback and 
receive, report writing 

Yes 

DB2, IMS 

From $12,000 

Saturn Systems, Inc. 
(800)328-6145 

Saturn-Base 

VMS, RSX, TSX, 
POS, RSTS 

Relational 

Proprietary 

Yes 

File level 

No 

Rekeying, data file extension, 
password modification 

No 

Any with ASCH 
files 

$1,850-$14,000 

Seed Software Corp. 

(800) 445-3267 

Seed DBMS, 
Proseed 

VAX/VMS, 
VM/CMS, OS/2, 
PC-DOS, MS- 
DOS, Primos 

Codasyl 

Proseed, 

DBQuery 

Yes 

Item level 

Under de¬ 
velop¬ 
ment 

Statistics on usage, 
optimization tool, readable 
data page dump with all 
pointers, broken-pointer 
search, broken-pointer repair 

Yes 

None 

From $995- 
$78,950 

Signal Technology, Inc. 

(800) 235-5787 

Omnibase 

VAX/VMS 

Relational 

SQL 

Yes 

Field level 

No 

NA 

No 

Britton Lee data 
bases 

$5,000-$55,000 

Smartstar 

VAX/VMS, 

MicroVMS 

Relational 

SQL 

Yes 

Field level 

No 

VAX/RDB 

No 

Datatrieve, VAX 
3GL languages, 
Oracle, Ingres, 
VAX RMS 
programs 

$3,500-$5,000 

Software AG of North 

America, Inc. 

(703) 860-5050 

Adabas 

All IBM OS, 
VAX/VMS, 
Siemens OS 

Relational 

Natural, all 3GL 
access through 
SQL-based 
syntax 

Yes 

File, field, value 
within field levels 

Yes 

All functions incorporated 
into base product 

Optional 

Any 

Contact vendor 

Sun Microsystems, Inc. 
(415)960-1300 

Sun Ingres 

Sun version of 
Unix 4.2 

Relational, 

network 

SQL 

Yes 

Data item level 

Yes 

Report writer, transaction 
logging 

Yes 

None 

$2,000-$3,000 

Sun Ingres 

Sun version of 
Unix 4.2 

Relational 

SQL, QUEL 

Yes 

Data item level 

Yes 

Report writer, transaction 
logging, custom forms 

Yes 

Unify, Ingres 
through batch 
conversion 

$2,500-$4,000 

Sybase, Inc. 

(415) 548-4500 

Sybase System 

Sun Unix, 

VAX/VMS, 

VAX/Ultrix 

Relational 

SQL, proprietary 

Yes 

Any level 

Yes 

Data base consistency 
checker, dump and load, bulk 
copy 

No 

None 

$10,000- 

$100,000 

Tandem Computers, Inc. 

(408) 725-6000 

Nonstop SQL 

Guardian 90 

Relational 

SQL 

Yes 

Value via SQL 
views 

Yes 

File utility programs, disk 
space analysis/disk space 
compression, backup/restore 

Yes 

Informix 

$3,000-$4,000 

The Ultimate Corp. 

(800) 654-0134 

Ultimate 

Operating 

System 

Ultimate, Pick 
enhanced 

Relational 

Proprietary 

Yes 

Value level 

Yes 

Restart, recovery, backup, 
full application development 
system 

Yes 

Any Pick system, 
RMS 

Contact vendor 

Unify Corp. 

(916)920-9092 

Unify 

Unix, MS-DOS, 
Network-DOS 

Relational 

SQL 

Yes 

Field level 

Yes 

Complete set 

Yes 

Optional 

$795-$50,000 

Unisyn, Inc. 

(303) 443-7878 

C-Scribe 

Unix 

Relational 

SQL 

Yes 

File level 

Yes 

All 

No 

HP Image 

$15,000 

Unisys Corp. 

(215) 542-6911 

Universal Data 

Management 

System 

OS-llOO 

Combines flat file, 

Codasyl, 

relational 

SQL 

Yes 

Field level 

Yes 

Statistics gathering, 
recovery, debugging and 
audit trail 

Optional 

None 

$89,000- 

$243,730 

Userware International, Inc. 
(619) 745-6006 

User-11 

RSTS/E 

Hierarchical 

Proprietary 

Yes 

Block level 

Yes 

— 

No 

User Base 

$7,500-$15,000 

Userbase 

VAX/VMS 

Hierarchical 

Proprietary 

Yes 

Block level 

Yes 

— 

No 

Any RMS-based 
file 

$7,500-$60,000 

Wang Laboratories, Inc. 
(617)459-5000 

Pace 

VS 

Relational 

SQL, Query-by- 
Example for Pace 
Query 

Yes 

View level 

Yes 

Recovery and backup, cross- 
reference reports, copy 
tables 

Yes 

IDMS/R 

$13,000-$39,000 

Westmoreland Software 

International, Inc. 

(305) 260-5858 

Add System 

IBM 5360, 
System/36 PC, 
System/34 

“ 




Yes 

Performance monitoring, 
report generator 

Yes 

— 

$3,600 

Zanthe Information/Unipress 
Software 
(201)985-8000 

ZIM 

Unix, Xenix, 
Ultrix, VMS, MS- 
DOS, PC-DOS, 
Novell, QNX 

Entity relational 

Proprietary, SQL 

Yes 

Field level 

Yes 


Yes 

None 

$795-$25,000 


S20 


COMPUTERWORLD 


AUGUST 10,1987 


































































OK, SORBUS. 

Tell me 

Let me know just what Sorbus 
service can do for me. 

more. 

Name: 

Title: 

Company: 

Street: 

Sorbus 

A Bell Atlantic Company 

City: State: Zip: 

I’m especially interested in service for the 

following hardware: 


In a hurry? Call 1 - 800 -FOR-INFO. 

cw 











Sorbus 

A Bell Atlantic Company 

50 E. Swedesford Road 
Frazer, PA 19355-9976 





























Nothing scares Sorbus people. 

Whatever it takes to exorcise your system’s demons, you can count on 
Sorbus. After all, we have the best-trained field sales force anywhere, 
with an average 20,000 class days every year. (Which makes our people 
anything but average.) 

And we support them with a 230,000 part-number inventory— 
including more than 6.2 million individual parts, at last count. And we stock 
them nationwide, so the part you need is usually nearby. Our elaborate 
parts testing program assures performance, too. 

No wonder our people are fearless. 

Our customers are, too. In fact, a recent survey by Data 
Communications rated us the “Best Service Organization.” And we’ve 
come out on top in Datamation and Computer Decisions surveys, too-for 
eleven and eight consecutive years, respectively. 

Don’t get scared. Get Sorbus. Call today. 1-800-FOR-INFO. 

A Bell Atlantic Company 



Sorbus is a registered trademark of Sorbus Inc. 


50 E. Swedesford Road 
Frazer, PA 19355 













(n)ffh only One copy of 
Compulerworlcf per feqoxkrnmi, 
Security i& exfremely 


The more valuable a publication, the more 
important it is to have your own copy. 

That’s why we’re offering you your own sub' 
scription to COMPUTERWORLD for just 76$ 
an issue. 

A week’s worth of news for 76 $. 

That’s right. For just 76$ an issue, you can 
find out what you need to know. When you need 
to know it. 

You’ll see what products breakthrough. And 
what products break down. You’ll get the news 
and views of the industry. And the ads and advice 
of its leaders. 

In fact, with COMPUTERWORLD on top 
of your desk, you’ll be on top of your job. 


And there’s more... 

In addition to your 51 issues of COMPUTER' 

WORLD, you’ll get - absolutely FREE... 

• 12 issues of COMPUTERWORLD FOCUS - 
an in-depth exploration of a single critical topic 
each month: communications, data security, 
PCs, Information Centers... 

• Our special S potlight section twice a month. 
Head-to-head product comparisons with an 
at-a-glance ratings chart. Security products, 
LANs, graphics workstations,...a different 
product in each issue. 

Call today. And stop waiting in line. 

1 - 800 - 255-6286 

(in NJ call 1-800-322-6286) 


COMPUTERWORLD 

THE NEWSWEEKLY FOR THE COMPUTER COMMUNITY 



















COMPUTERINDUSTRY 


Tandon exec 
passes posts 
to founder 


BY JAMES A. MARTIN 

CW STAFF 


CHATSWORTH, Calif. — Tandon Corp. 
President and Chief Operating Officer 
Dan H. Wilkie has resigned that position, 
relinquishing both titles to S. L. “Jugi” 
Tandon, the company’s founder, chair¬ 
man and chief executive officer. 

Wilkie, who has served as Tandon’s 
president and chief operating officer since 
December 1985, will remain with the 
company to oversee its possible spin-off of 
a third-party service firm. Although plans 
are incomplete, Wilkie said discussions 
are ongoing with Tandon’s board regard¬ 
ing his appointment as president and chief 
executive officer of the company’s service 
organization. 

“Tandon has wanted to have a more 
active role, and I’ve wanted to have more 
autonomy,” Wilkie said. “A pet project of 
mine has been the customer service area, 
which I’ve been wanting to expand to 
serve non-Tandon products. We decided 
we would both be better off this way.” 

Wilkie, a longtime IBM executive be¬ 
fore joining Tandon, brushed aside con¬ 
tentions that he resigned because of dis¬ 
putes with top management. “Anytime 
there’s a company with such complexity, 
there are always differences of opinion,” 
Wilkie explained. “My relationship with 
Tandon is amiable.” 

Several analysts expressed surprise at 
the announcement. “Tandon has just 
gone through a period of financial difficul¬ 
ty, with their recent quarters showing im¬ 
provement, so it was a surprise to see Wil¬ 
kie step aside,” said Ray Freeman Jr., 
president of Santa Barbara, Calif.-based 
Freeman Associates, a consulting firm. 


CEO leaves 
redone Tigera 

BELMONT, Calif. — Former Fortune 
Systems, Inc. Chairman James S. Camp¬ 
bell resigned last week as chairman, pres¬ 
ident and chief executive officer of Tigera 
Group, Inc., the renamed parent company 
of Fortune Systems’ software business. 

Campbell had helped orchestrate the 
recent sale of Fortune’s ailing supermicro 
hardware business to SCI Systems Corp. 
in Huntsville, Ala. In a statement, Camp¬ 
bell said the completion of that sale al¬ 
lowed him to become a principal in Man¬ 
agement Partners International, Inc. 

Named to replace Campbell as chair¬ 
man of Tigera Group was Isaac Gilinski, 
president of Industries Gilinski, a diversi¬ 
fied manufacturer in Cali, Colombia. Su¬ 
san Espy will continue as president of Ti¬ 
gera Corp., the company’s software unit. 

In financial results that partially re¬ 
flected charges from its restructuring, Ti¬ 
gera Group reported a loss of $12.9 mil¬ 
lion on revenue of $1.3 million for the 
quarter ended June 30. 


Parts tariff 

CONTINUED FROM PAGE 71 

result of the U.S.-Japan dispute over 
semiconductor trade [CW, April 27]. 

“Our member companies are deeply 
concerned about the ruling because it 
runs afoul of the 100% tariff,” said Char¬ 
lotte LeGates, a spokeswoman for the 
Computer and Business Equipment Man¬ 
ufacturers Association (CBEMA), which 
is based here. 

Asked for reprieve 

In a July 28 letter to the Customs Service, 
CBEMA called for a 60-day suspension of 
the ruling to give the industry time to re¬ 
but it. Also, the trade group is urgently 


seeking an interview with William von 
Raab, commissioner of the Customs Ser¬ 
vice, LeGates said. 

According to CBEMA officials the rul¬ 
ing, made without a public hearing, is con¬ 
trary to the long-standing experience of 
the computer industry and contrary to the 
letter and spirit of the 1985 trade agree¬ 
ment. 

“It creates new, unfounded and unnec¬ 
essary administrative criteria for deter¬ 
mining the tariff status of hundreds of 
thousands of computer parts,” CBEMA’s 
letter to customs added. 

The decision 

The Customs Service ruling was issued by 
John T. Roth, the agency’s director of 
classification, who argued that a circuit 


board capable of performing data process¬ 
ing and arithmetical computations is a 
data processing machine and, therefore, 
subject to tariff. 

The industry generally refers to the 
boards as “single-board computers,” he 
said, thereby confirming that they are 
computers rather than parts. 

Roth’s legal ruling asserted that even 
though CPU boards must be plugged into 
a computer system in order to function, 
they are distinct commercial products 
that are ultimately capable of being pro¬ 
grammed and executing programs, thus 
fitting the definition of data processing 
machines. 

Expansion boards and boards used to 
control peripherals are properly classified 
as parts, the ruling said. 



It seemed like the sensible thing to do. Your distributor in 
Munich, a great marketing partner, would place all your German 
ads. After all, it’s his local market, so he can get you better rates. 

But not better than IDG Communications’ International 
Marketing Services. 

For starters, we offer a network buy of over 55 computer 
publications in 28 different countries, with a full 15 percent 
agency commission, up to another 15 percent with our corporate 
discount, and no value-added taxes. 

Compare IDG Communications with your distributors’ 
media capabilities and the benefits of working with International 
Marketing Services become obvious. 


International Marketing Services 
Frank Cutitta, Managing Director 



Working with IDG 
Communications 

Placing through 
Distributors 

Corporate Discount 

up to 15% 

none 

Agency Commission 

15% 

0-15% 

Exchange Rate 

Fixed for 

Fluctuates with 

Campaign 

Market 

Value-added Tax 

0 

10-22% 

Central Billing in U.S. Dollars 
Professional Translation and 

Yes 

No 

Adaptation Services 

Yes 

Maybe 

Local Control for You 

Yes 

No 


Nobody offers more cost-effective access to the world’s 
computer markets than IDG Communications. 

So have your man in Munich do what he does best: sell 
your product. And put us to work at what we do best servicing 
international advertisers. For more information and an Interna¬ 
tional Marketing Services media kit, call 800-343-6474 today 
(in MA 617-879-0700). 


East Coast Sales Office: 

Ellen Levin 

Eastern Marketing Manager 
375 Cochituate Road, Box 9171 
Framingham, MA 01701-9171 
(800)343-6474 
(617)879-0700 

West Coast Sales Office: 

Leslie Barner 

Western Marketing Manager 
3350 WestBayshore Road, Suite 201 
Palo Alto, CA 94303 
(415)424-1001 

International 

Marketing 

Services 

A division of 

m\DG 

COMMUNICATIONS 


AUGUST 10,1987 


COMPUTERWORLD 


73 


















COMPUTER INDUSTRY 


Rumor mill 

CONTINUED FROM PAGE 71 
hint of bad news. 

One of those hints, at least for many 
vendors of microcomputer peripherals, 
was the IBM Personal System/2. Its po¬ 
tential to rearrange that market niche 
created a volatile situation that many in¬ 
vestors would rather not risk. 

In general, the market seems ready 
to beat down the price of an otherwise sol¬ 
id computer company at the first glitch 
in growth rates. Two cases in point are 
Cray Research, Inc. and Alliant Comput¬ 
er Systems Corp. — firms with well-re¬ 
garded management teams and impres¬ 
sive technology that seem well positioned 


for the long haul. 

But both firms recently announced 
slower quarters than expected. Now Al- 
liant’s stock is hovering in the high teens 
after peaking at 37; Cray is near 100 after 
rising higher than 135. 

Another factor affecting investors is 
the torrid pace of mergers and acquisi¬ 
tions in the industry this year. The 
Broadview Associates index of software 
and services industry deals is up again 
for the first six months of the year: 137 
deals for $2.1 billion, compared with 130 
deals for $1.9 billion in the first half of 
1986. 

A wave of industry marriages invari¬ 
ably produces an even bigger wave of 
takeover rumors — thus the laughable 
phenomenon of CDC’s stock rising on 


such a rumor. This rumor will undoubt¬ 
edly take its place in the Non-News Hall of 
Fame, along with AT&T buying Wang 
Laboratories, Inc., AT&T buying Digital 
Equipment Corp., Ford Motor Co. and 
NCR Corp. buying Sperry Corp. and, 
most recently, Prime Computer, Inc. 
buying Data General Corp. 

In reporting the plunge in NEC’s 
stock last week, one national newspaper 
wrote, “One trader said that a rumor 
sometimes has much greater impact on a 
stock than fact.” That line speaks vol¬ 
umes about trying to gauge a company’s 
prospects as a vendor on what happens 
to its shares in the stock market. 


Wilder is Computerworld’s senior editor, comput¬ 
er industry. 


Now Computerworld puls 

the power of over 800 on-line 
databases at your fingertips. 



SearchLink is easy to use and inexpensive. 


If you need instant access to news and information 
about your competition, your profession, technology, 
finance, law, or just about any other subject, 
Computerworld’s SearchLink will give it to you. 


All you need is a credit card and a computer 
with modem. 

No subscriptions. No passwords. No 
difficult manuals to learn. Just call 800-843-7337 
with your computer and log on. You pay only 
$7.99 per search (a few databases carry 
surcharges) plus 25 cents per minute for telecommuni 
cations and $2 for each abstract you want to see. (You 
can also get hard copies.) You can charge 
everything to MasterCard, VISA, or 
American Express. 


SearchLink provides 
24'hour on-line assistance. 

SearchLink even gives 
you free on-line tips from trained 
SearchLink search specialists if 
you have problems or questions 
about your searching. Just type 
“SOS” when you’re on-line! 


ABI/INFORM • Business Software Database • Chemical Abstracts • COMPENDEX’ • Disclosure • 
Computer Database • Donnelley Demographics • COMPUTERPAT • Dun & Bradstreet • INSPEC • ERIC • 
Menu-The International Software Database • PTS PROMT • Microcomputer Index • Standard and Poor's 
Corporate Descriptions • Online Microcomputer Software • Trademarkscan • SUPERTECH • TRINET • 
Biological & Agricultural Index • German Business Scope • Combined Health Information • Gray’s Anatomy 
• Excerpta Medica • Pharmaceutical News Index • Medline • Index to Legal Periodicals • Laborlaw • Legal 
Resource Index • Associated Press • PR Newswire • UPI News • Reuter News Reports • Communications 
Daily • FCC Daily Digest • Fiber/Optics News • International Communications Week • Investext Databases • 
Wall Street Monitor: Weekly Market Digest • American Petroleum Institute • Bond Buyer • Insurance 
Abstracts • International Dun’s Market Identifiers • Financial Times • Japan Weekly Monitor • Washington 
Post « New York Timers » I as Anneles Times « San Franrisrn Chrnn irlp « n&R Million nnllar Dirprtnru « 


SearchLink gets you to the information you want. 

If you’ve ever wanted to access databases offered 
by BRS, Dialog, or NewsNet, among others, SearchLink 
will access databases from all of them—without any 

\ □ Please send me "A User’s Guide to SearchLink”—FREE! 

| □ Please send me a list of databases available through SearchLink. 

Name_ I 

| Title___ | 

Company_ 

! Co. address_ I 


special subscriptions or knowledge of special search 
languages. 

Call 800-843-7337 with your computer now! 

Put the power of knowledge to work for you right 
now. Call 800-843-7337 (THE SEER) on your computer 
and get the answers you need to stay ahead. 

SEARCHLINK 

Your link to the world of information 

An International Data Group Service 


City_State_Zip_ 

Phone_ 

Mail to: SearchLink, Box 9171, Framingham, MA 01701-9171 


SearchLink is sponsored by the National Federation of Abstracting and Information Services. NFA1S is a professional 
association of database producers. 

SearchLink is an electronic gateway service co-developed by CW Communications/Inc. (CWCI) and Telebase Systems 
that provides the unique ability to easily access a wide variety of databases from numerous database vendors without 
passwords, subscriptions or knowledge of complex search languages The database vendors that SearchLink accesses 
are not affiliated with CWCI and operate as separate business entities independent of CWCI. While a vast amount of 
valuable data from these vendors is accessible ttirough SearchLink's state-of-the-art technology, neither CWCI, nor 
Telebase, warrant the reliability or accuracy of the database vendors' data and SearchLink's operation should not be mis¬ 
construed as an endorsement of any database or its content. 


To connect to SearchLink: set your computer/modem as follows: 8 bit “word” size; 1 stop bit; “none” parity; full duplex; 300 or 1,200 baud 
speed; no line feed on carriage return; X ON/X OFF supported. For more information about SearchLink BY VOICE, dial 617-879-0700. 


TRW service 

CONTINUED FROM PAGE 71 

“We want customers to recognize us as 
an extension of their company.” 

TRW’s Customer Service Division is 
running neck and neck with Sorbus for 
leadership in the $1.6 billion third-party 
computer maintenance business. The di¬ 
vision is faced not only with a recommit¬ 
ted IBM but with competition from other 
hardware manufacturers, such as Digital 
Equipment Corp., which are expanding 
their maintenance activity. Both the 
TRW division and Sorbus claim revenues 
of around $220 million. Sorbus, however, 
formerly owned by now-defunct Manage¬ 
ment Assistance, Inc., counts revenue 
from servicing computers of ex-sister 
company MAI Basic Four, Inc. as third- 
party revenue, which has added consider¬ 
ably to its market position. 

No longer ‘top banana’ 

“TRW was always the top banana in the 
third-party maintenance business over 
the last couple of years, but now they are 
sharing the limelight with Sorbus,” says 
D. R. “Mike” MacNaughton, president of 
Business Development International, a 
Franklin Lakes, N.J., consulting firm that 
tracks the business. 

TRW’s plan to diversify into applica¬ 
tion and operating software maintenance 
and consulting services should help it fend 
off the competition, analysts say. 

“Generally, the issue is not just being 
in the hardware maintenance business, 



TRW’s Snyder 


but being able to implement different ser¬ 
vices,” notes Rebecca Segal, an analyst 
with International Data Corp. “Software 
support, communications and training are 
segments that will help grow the busi¬ 
ness.” 

Snyder says he is on the prowl for ac¬ 
quisitions that would complement the 
firm’s current business activities. The di¬ 
vision is evaluating companies that main¬ 
tain equipment in the financial services, 
retailing, resellers, government and med¬ 
ical markets. Through a mix of internal 
growth and acquisitions, Snyder says he 
hopes to double the division’s revenue 
during the next three years. 

The resources necessary to do these 
things and more are plentiful at a $6.5 bil¬ 
lion conglomerate, Snyder says. TRW re¬ 
cently designated its Information Sys¬ 
tems Group as one of the profit centers in 
which it will invest heavily. Snyder says 
increasing the technical expertise of his 
field engineers is among his highest prior¬ 
ities. To accomplish this, the division 
plans to offer a better training program 
and incentives to personnel. 


74 


COMPUTERWORLD 


AUGUST 10,1987 



























































Reach potential customers 

just as they’re ready to buy 



In SPOTLIGHT, the buyer’s guide to the computer world. 


Inside Computerworld these days, you’ll find SPOTLIGHT. Each one a special “buyer’s 
guide" covering features, prices and specs for every major offering in a given product category. 

For our readers, SPOTLIGHT provides a unique feature-by-feature tabulated product com¬ 
parison in a handy pullout section. A section they’ll save for quick reference when they’re ready 
to buy. Plus editorial covering technology trends, user reports and broad category overviews. 

For our advertisers, it provides an opportunity to strike while the iron is hot. And reinforce 
sales messages at precisely the right moment. Just as buying decisions are being made. 

So reserve your space in SPOTLIGHT now. And get your message across when it will do the 
most good. When the buyers are buying. ______ __________ 

For more information, contact Ed Marecki, Vice £OnAPlJTERinfORLD 
President/Sales at (617) 879-0700, or call your local . _ . 

^ , . . . .» J An IDG Communications 

Computerworld sales representative. Publication 

Sales Offices: 

Boston: (617) 879-0700 New York: (201) 967-1350 Washington D.C.: (703) 280-2027 Atlanta: (404) 394-0758 

Chicago: (312) 827-4433 Dallas: (214) 233-0882 Los Angeles: (714) 261-1230 San Francisco: (415) 421-7330 


Issue 


Upcoming SPOTLIGHT Issues 

. Ad Closing 

Topic Date 


Aug. 31 DBMS for Micros & Small Aug. 14 

Systems 

Sept. 14 DB2 Market Aug. 28 

Sept. 21 Hardware Roundup: Sept. 4 

Large & Medium Scale 
Systems 

Sept. 28 Hardware Roundup: Sept. 11 

Small Scale Systems 

Oct. 5 Hardware Roundup: Sept. 18 

Micros 

Oct. 12 Leasing & Used Sept. 25 

Equipment 

Oct. 19 Capacity Planning/ Oct. 2 

Performance Monitoring 
Software 

Oct. 26 Unix Oct. 9 






















































































































































































s> W - 








i 


-r- 


Computerworld Focus has always been one of the smartest buys 
around. Because it lets you maximize the impact of your advertising by 
surrounding your message with timely editorial that's relevant to your com¬ 
pany's product or service. In the coming year, you'll be able to target your 
message in issues devoted to topics like communications, personal com¬ 
puters, operating systems, applications software and more. 

So put more Focus into your advertising for 1987 And reach the 
$120 billion market consisting of more than 128,000 paid Computerworld 
subscribers, plus thousands more in pass-along readership and bonus distri¬ 
bution at major national shows. 

So don't shotgun your advertising budget when targeting your 
audience is so simple. 

All you have to do is get your message in Focus. 

Computerworld Focus Topic Issue Date Closing Date* Show Distribution 




Information Centers** 
PCs 

Software 


October 7 
November 4 
December 2 


September 4 
October 2 
October 30 




Comdex/Fall 
Dexpo West 


•Premium positions dose one week prior to the published dosing date above 
* ‘Starch Ad Study Issues 

For more information, contact Ed Marecki, Vice President/Sales, 
Computerworld Focus, 375 Cochituate Rd., Box 9171, Framingham, MA 
01701-9171 (617) 879-0700. Or contact your local Computerworld sales 
representative. 


COMPUTERWORLD 


FlOlClUiS 




An IDG Communications Publication 


BOSTON: 375 Cochituate Road, Box 9171, Framingham, MA 01701-9171, (617) 879-0700 NEW YORK: Paramus Plaza, 1,140 Route 17 North, Suite 312, 
Paramus, NJ 07652, (201) 967-1350 WASHINGTON, D.C.: 3022 Javier Rd., #210, Fairfax, VA 22031, (703) 280-2027 CHICAGO: 2600 South River Road, 
Suite 304, Des Plaines, IL 60018, (312) 827-4433 ATLANTA: 1400 Lake Hearn Drive, Suite 330, Atlanta, GA 30319, (404) 394-0758 DALLAS: 14651 Dallas 
Parkway, Suite 304, Dallas, TX 75240 (214) 233-0882 LOS ANGELES: 18004 Sky Park Circle, Suite 255, Irvine, CA 92714, (714) 261-1230 
SAN FRANCISCO: 300 Broadway, Suite 20, San Francisco, CA 94133, (415) 421-7330 






















EMPLOYMENT TODAY 


Making the switch to sales 

Vendors seek technology know-how for marketing positions 



BY STEPHEN BANKER 

SPECIAL TO CW 

After pursuing 
an early career 
in data pro¬ 
cessing and 
assembly lan¬ 
guage pro¬ 
gramming, Peter Green 

switched from the technical to 
the “people” side of the business 
three years ago when he joined 
General Electric Consulting Ser¬ 
vices. Today, at 39, he is mar¬ 
keting and sales manager for the 
Northeast area, working out of 
Albany, N.Y. 

“I was a machine person, and 
I said to myself, ‘I can have more 
fun being a people person,’ ” 
Green says. That simple state¬ 
ment explains why Green and 
many DP people like him are 
jumping from technical positions 
to sales and marketing. 

As computer products be¬ 
come increasingly complex in an 
era of rapidly changing technol¬ 
ogy, they are, inevitably, more 
difficult to explain. In some in¬ 
stances, computer companies 
are finding that the most effec¬ 
tive people to showcase their 
products — and to differentiate 
them from those of the competi¬ 
tion — are the people who have 
worked on the original design 
and implementation. 

Superior financial rewards on 


the sales side are part of the rea¬ 
son for the trend, according to 
those making the switch. One 
DP worker who is considering 
the change says, “Here I am 
making $40,000 a year, killing 
myself, helping the salesman 
make $80,000. Hey, I know as 
much as him. In fact, I do all his 
work for him. Why don’t I make 
that kind of money?” 

“If I were still in the DP 
shop,” says another worker, 
who has already made the transi¬ 
tion, “my day would be 8 a.m. to 
5 p.m., earning 30% to 40% less, 
and [I would be] underchal¬ 
lenged. Now, I like my job 
enough so that it’s almost like a 
compulsion, and I frequently 
work from 6 a.m. to 10 p.m.” 

Not everybody fits 

But the move is not right for ev¬ 
eryone. The marketing job re¬ 
quires considerable desire. De¬ 
spite his overall increase in 
income and job satisfaction, the 
individual who changed positions 
has actually taken a cut in his 
hourly rate. 

“The technical people who 
move into sales are very custom¬ 
er-oriented to begin with,” says 
Dennis Jolly, director of sales for 
PC’s Limited in Austin, Texas. 
“There are people who are in 
technical jobs who are happy 
where they are and would not be 
happy in sales, because sales re¬ 


quires some specific personality 
traits.” 

What are those traits? “Sales¬ 
men are very competitive peo¬ 
ple,” says Harvey Silver of Dun- 
hill Personnel Consultants in 
Tysons Corner, Va. “Every sale 
is a conquest. A person finds 
himself with his ego exposed to 
the whim of the buyer.” 

Silver suggests that the gov¬ 
ernment marketplace, compared 


shirt. In government sales, you 
get down there in the trenches. 
It’s more proposal-oriented.” 

Tarnish to the glitter 

But personal style is not the only 
obstacle to the transition. 
“You’re going from salary,” Sil¬ 
ver says, “to a situation in which 
compensation is based on pro¬ 
duction. You have the risk of re¬ 
jection and a series of highs and 
lows. All of a sudden, that money 
becomes less glittery.” 

There is clearly a price to be 
paid for the extra earnings in 
terms of hours, aggravation and 
responsibility. Sales jobs in the 



N THE commercial world, the image of a 
salesman is different. Even your car has to 
be nice, in case you have to take a client out 
to lunch. A technical sort might not have that pin¬ 
striped kind of appearance.” 

HARVEY SILVER 
DUNHILL PERSONNEL CONSULTANTS 


with the private sector, offers a 
smoother transition for DP 
workers and other technically 
oriented personnel who want to 
go into sales and marketing. 

“In the commercial world, 
the image of a salesman is differ¬ 
ent,” Silver says. “Even your car 
has to be nice, in case you have to 
take a client out to lunch. A tech¬ 
nical sort might not have that 
pin-striped kind of appearance. 
The government market doesn’t 
demand the classic starched 


computer industry are likely to 
take a worker away from home a 
few days every week. 

Even the money is deceptive. 
A typical DP worker, earning 
perhaps $40,000 a year, is like¬ 
ly, at first, to be kicked down to 
$30,000 with the prospect of 
commissions. But before the 
commissions start coming in, 
mortgages and other bills remain 
due every month. The bottom 
line is that turnover among sales 
agents is consistently higher 


than among technical people. 

Manny Fernandez, president 
of Dataquest, Inc. in San Jose, 
Calif., draws a distinction be¬ 
tween types of computer compa¬ 
nies. “The best utilization of 
technical personnel,” he says, 
“is when the marketing of the 
product is highly technical. 

“Take the companies with 
the newest 32-bit machines, mi¬ 
croprocessors and peripherals,” 
Fernandez explains, “that’s 
when a product tasks the com¬ 
puter beyond its normal applica¬ 
tions, and you have to become 
highly involved in the architec¬ 
ture of the machine. You need a 
design-level understanding to be 
able to talk to the customer. 
Then, the chances are that 
someone from the engineering 
organization will make a heck of 
a lot more sense, taking it down 
to the device level.” 

On the other hand, Fernandez 
adds, there is the situation of “a 
company selling DP equipment 
into a DP shop to do the same 
things they have done in the 
past; there’s no necessity for a 
technical person to be involved 
in the sale.” 

The consensus is that for 
those seeking to make a move, 
the best place is one’s current 
job. As Silver says, “If the guy 
knows the product well, they’ll 
give him a shot because he’s bug¬ 
ging them to death. The compa¬ 
nies aren’t going to pay me large 
dollars to get them people 
who’ve had no experience.” 


Banker is a Washington, D.C.-based 
writer. 



Lachman Associates, Inc. 

UNIX®SYSTEMS PROFESSIONALS 


LAI is looking for experienced software specialists interested 
in projects dealing with leading-edge technologies. Positions 
now available in software development and telecommunications 
include the following: 

• Project Manager, System Architects, Systems Programmer, 
and Tools Developer to guest a UNIX® system on a main¬ 
frame operating system. 

• System V and 4.x internals specialists to port UNIX systems 
to machines ranging from supercomputer to micros. 

• Call processing assignments on class 4/5 central office 
systems, packet switching systems, and various digital 
and analog PABX systems. 

Among the requirements are: a minimum 3 years of C language 
programming; strong UNIX Internals; GCOS® systems 
experience; command porting, device driver, and system call 
experience. For Immediate consideration, send your resume to: 

Lachman Associates, Inc. 

1901 N. Naper Boulevard 
Naperville, IL 60540-1031 
Attn: Staffing - CW 
or UUCP: ...llaidbakljobs 

{ LAI is an equal opportunity employer 

UNIX® is a registered trademark of AT&T 
GCOS® is a registered trademark of Honeywell Bull Inc. 

I .— / 


USAA with one of the South¬ 
west's largest Data Processing 
centers has an immediate 
need for: 

PROGRAMMERS 

PROGRAMMER/ 

ANALYSTS 

Large IBM mainframe experience 
with MVS/XA, IMS, CICS, TSO. 
SPF, DB2 in both on-line or batch 
environment. 

Successful candidates should 
have 2-5 years experience with 
one or more of the following: 
COBOL, PLI, JCL, FOCUS, in an 
Insurance. Financial or Banking 
environment. USAA offers 
exceptional work environment 
and advancement opportunities 
plus competitive compensation 
and benefits program. 

If you are interested and meet 
our qualifications please send 
resume and salary history to: 

USAA 

USAA Building 

Son Antonio. TX 78288 
Attn, Employment 8. 

Placement/D| 

An tqual Opportunity Employer 


tAg 

USAA 




SR. PROGRAMMERS 


Kemper Financial Services, Inc., Chicago's lead¬ 
ing investment management firm, has imme¬ 
diate openings for Sr. Programmers. 

These candidates will be responsible for install¬ 
ing a large mainframe system that automates 
various securities brokerage functions, includ¬ 
ing order entry, margining and trading systems. 


This position requires a minimum of four years 
programming in COBOL. In addition, a mini¬ 
mum of one year working with brokerage appli¬ 
cations on a large IBM mainframe is preferred. 
Experience with Command Level CICS or ADR 
Database is a plus. 



We offer an excellent compensation and bene¬ 
fits package. For consideration, submit your 
resume with salary history to: Kemper Financial 
Services, Inc., Human Resources Dept. 8744, 
120 S. LaSalle St., Chicago, IL 60603. An equal 
opportunity employer m/f. 


KfemPBR 

1 1 

GROUP 


1_1 


Kemper Financial Services 

Performance, Not Promises 


AUGUST 10, 1987 


COMPUTERWORLD 


77 








































EMPLOYMENT TODAY 


Senior 

Database 

Administrator 


Create New Systems 
Using Relational 
Databases (DB 2) 


As the world’s pre-eminent direct mail marketer, our success is con¬ 
tingent on streamlined systems of the highest calibre. Right now, 
we have an opportunity for a Senior Database Administrator to im¬ 
plement a major DB 2 application and associated applications 
development tools. 

You will be expected to have a high level of technical expertise 
augmented by a willingness and ability to play an active role in our 
applications design team. Ideally, you should have 5-8 years of data 
base design, installation and tuning expertise in IBM mainframes, 
including some experience with relational databases in a produc¬ 
tion environment A Bachelor’s degree and outstanding com¬ 
munications skills are required. 

This highly visible position commands an excellent salary and full 
array of company benefits within our forward-moving environment. 

For further information, 
please call Steve McDonald 
(215) 459-6258 

or send resume, indicating salary history to: Executive Recruiter, 
Dept. SDA C 810, The Franklin Mint, Franklin Center, PA 19091. 
Equal opportunity employer 



PROGRAMMER 
Jr. Level 


CardioCare, a nationwide health care 
organization seeks a talented Jr Pro¬ 
grammer in this highly visible, “junior 
exec” position 

You'll learn and grow within our dynam¬ 
ic team of experts as you help program 
and maintain systems to suit the com¬ 
pany's needs in our stimulating, tech¬ 
nologically ahead environment 

To qualify, you must possess at least 2- 
3 years experience on HP 3000, along 
with good interpersonal skills to inter¬ 
face with user population. FORTRAN 
and/or COBOL knowledge is essential. 

We offer an excellent starting salary (up 
to $27K) commensurate with experi¬ 
ence plus the opportunity for advance¬ 
ment within. For prompt consideration, 
send your resume with salary history 
to: 

Human Resources Department, 
11th fir. 

CardioCare 

118-35 Queens Blvd. 

Forest Hills, NY 11375 

(No phone calls) 

Equal Opportunity Employer 


Medtronic M Cardiocare 


SOFTWARE SPECIALIST Design, test, de¬ 
velop and modify computer software systems, 
applications and user interfaces. Develop ap¬ 
plications and/or systems software in "C" and 
the UNIX* operating system environment. De¬ 
sign applications utilizing database systems 
and computer graphics. Evaluate the UNIX 
operating system and design subsystems 
within the operating systems kernel and at the 
application level to enhance and extend the 
functionality of the system. Some projects are 
performed on client sites at various geograph¬ 
ic locations. Minimum Requirements: M S. in 
Computer Science. One year experience in 
the position offered or one year experience as 
a research or teaching assistant using the 
UNIX operating systems. One course in each 
of the following: Advanced Operating Sys¬ 
tems, Real-time Operating Systems, Princi¬ 
ples of Programming Languages, Computer 
Graphics and Database Design and Imple¬ 
mentation. Must have completed one major 
project in operating systems internals. Must 
be willing to travel an average of 25% of time, 
domestically 40 hours per week. 9:00 a m. to 
5 p.m. $33,327 per year. Submit resume to: Il¬ 
linois Department of Employment Security, 
401 South State Street, 3 South, Chicago, IL 
60605, Attention: Mrs. S. Chalem, Reference 
#6791-S. AN EMPLOYER PAID AD 

* UNIX is a registered trademark of AT&T. 


Software 

Consultants 


Immediate Assignments 
Boston Area 

Minimum 2years experience 
required 

• ADABAS/NATURAL - 

Contractual & permanent 
positions 

• COBOL/CICS 

• IDMS, CICS, COBOL 

• Financial Applications 
Analyst w/ any of the follow¬ 
ing: portfolio fund account¬ 
ing; banking; securities; or 
mutual funds 

Send your resume or call Joe 
Candito or Tom Schellenberg. 


ADEPT 


ADEFT, Inc. 

170 Worcester Road, Suite 5 
Wellesley, MA 02181 
(617)239-1700 

Member of NEACCB 


PROGRAMMER 

ANALYSTS 

Permanent and/or 
Consultant Positions 
NY Metropolitan Area 

UNISYS 

• Sr Data Communications Analyst 

w/5-7 yrs Data Communications exp, 

NDL, ALGOL. Telecommunications 
Hardware. ASYNC, BYSYNC 

• Data Communications Proj Leader 
w/8-10 yrs overall exp, Telecommunications 
Hardware, writing & planning skis, able to 
interface w/mgmt 

DEC 

• Prog'r/Analyst Banking Background 
w/VAX, VMS, Basic. 3-5 yrs exp. 

IBM 

• Experienced Progr/Analysts using FOCUS 

Please call Dewey Raymond, 
212-684-3950 or submit resume to: 
HANK WALSH ASSOCIATES 
475 Fifth Ave, NY, NY 10017 



To achieve the most effective 
career growth you really do 
need the expertise of experi¬ 
enced career consultants who 
specialize, on a daily basis, in 
EDP placement. And you'll find 
that our people, at National 
Computer Associates, are 
among the very best. Also you 
need to know all about the great 
number of excellent opportuni¬ 
ties, both locally and nationally, 
available to you...and it’s 
unlikely that you'll find more 
elsewhere. The many special¬ 
ized services and inside infor¬ 
mation we provide you is your 
assurance that your career 
moves will be the best for you. 

Come in. Call. Or mail your 
resume to the NCA firm near¬ 
est to you. 


ATIAVTA: DataPro Personnel Consultants 
400 Perimeter Center Terrace. Suite 650 
Atlanta. GA 30346 (404) 392-4242 
BALTWORL ClPS Inc 
1107 Kenmlworth Dnve. Suite 206 
Towson MD 21204 (301) 296-8420 
•OSTOH: Robert Kleven & Co . Inc 
P0 Box 636 

Lexington MA 02173 (617) 861-1020 
CKCR00. Thomas Hirtz & Associates 
150 Worth Wacker Dnve, Suite 1700 
Chicago. IL 60606 (312) 977-1555 
CKCMUT1: Task Group 
7875 Reading Road 
Oncmnati. OH 45237 (513) 821-8275 
CLEVELAND: Innovative Resources. Inc 
Staffer Office Tower. Suite 426 
East 12th & Euclid 

Cleveland, OH 44115 (216) 621-4220 
C0 U JM0U I : Michael Thomas. Inc 
450 W Wilson Bndoe Road, Suite 340 
Worthington. OH 43085 (614) 846-0926 
BAHAI; DataPro Personnel Consultants. Inc 
12720 Hillcrest. Suite 520 
Dallas TX 75230 (214) 661-8600 
OOVER: Abacus Consultants, Inc 
1777 South Harnson Street, Suite 404 
Denver, C O 80210 (303) 759-5064 
DETROIT: Electronic Systems Personnel 
3000 Town Center, Suite 2580 
Southfield Ml 48075 (313) 353-5580 
GRUSSMAO; DataMasters 
P0 Box 14548 
Greensboro, NC 27415-4548 
(9 19) 373-1 461 

HARTFORD: Compass Incorporated 

900 Asylum Avenue 

Har llord . CT 06105 (203) 549-4240 

NOUfTOt: Career Consultants. Inc 

1980 Post Oak Boulevard. Suite 1050 

Houston, TX 77056 (713) 626-4100 

KAMA! CfTY: DP Career Associates 

6405 Metcalf. Suite 502 

Shawnee Mission. KS 66202 (913) 236-8288 

LOS AKE11S: Superior Resources, Inc 

22653 Pacific Coast Highway. Suite 1-106 

Malibu CA 90265 (818) 884-3000 

MIAMI: Data Sciences Personnel. Inc 

P0 Box8577 

Hollywood. FL 33024 (305) 434-6112 

MILWAUKEE- E OP Consultants. Inc 

Chancellory Park II. Suite 350 

350 N Sunnyslope Road 

Brooklield. Wl 53005 (414) 797-8855 

MAFIS./ST. PAUL Electronic Systems Personnel 

880 international Centre 

900 2nd Avenue South 

Minneapolis. MN 55402 (612) 338-6714 

KW JERSEY: Systems Search 

90 Mitlburn Avenue. P0 Box 751 

Millburn, NJ 07041 (201)761-4400 

KW Y0AK: Botai Associates. Inc 

7 0ey Street. Suite 410 

New York NY 10007 (212) 227-7370 

PfHLADELPtMA: Systems Personnel. Inc 

115 West State Street 

Media PA 19063(215)565-8880 

PMOEMX: Professional Career Consultants 

4725 North Scottsdale Road. Suite 209 

Scottsdale AZ 85251 (602) 274-6666 

ROCHESTER: T/aynor Confidential Ltd 

10 Gibbs Street. Suite 400 

Rochester NY 14604 (716) 325-6610 

SAA OtEGO: Technical Directions Inc 

5005 Texas Street. Suite 301 

San Diego CA 92108 (619) 297-5611 

SAI FRANCISCO The Computer Resources 

Group Inc 

303 Sacramento Street 
San Francisco CA 94111 (415) 398-3535 
SEATTlf: Houser Martin Morris & Assoc 
1940 116th Avenue NE. Box C-90015 
Bellevue WA 98004 (206) 453-2700 
SYRACUSE: CFA Associates Personnel Inc 
5790 Widewaters Parkway 
Dewitt. NY 13214(315)446-8492 
WASHINGTON DC: Bill Young & Associates 
8322 Professional Hill Drive 
Fairfax VA 22031 (703) 573-0200 
AUSTRALIA: Slade Consulting Group Pty Ltd 
37 Albert Road Melbourne. Victoria 
Australia 3004 (03) 820-1085 



National 

Computer 

Associates 





Contracts 


THdent, ■ ma|or force In European contract staffing, is making It big In 
America. Wa have urgent requirements for the following with two+ years' 
experience. 

CONTACT 

HOT ■ URGENTt Programmers/Prog. Analysts/3 +yrs. exp./ 

Military Integrated Logistics/Configuration Mgmt. - Northeast BH or DC 
'C’UNIX/Data Base/4GL SWEng - O seas. 2 yrs. - Sweden SG 

Wang Financial Prog./Analysts - Best A West BH 

VAX/Cobol Programmers - MASS. A East BH 

Data Base Design - Ingres. Focus, Oracle or Rdb BH 

IBM Sys 38, RPG III Prog./Analysts/Trainers - West BH 

VAX "C" S/W Eng. w/Microsoft Windows Exp. ■ East BH 

UNISYS (Sperry) Mapper P/A, DB Design - PA SM 

UNISYS (Burroughs) MCP Syst./Prog. - MASS. SM 

UNISYS (Burroughs) Algol P/A - Northeast SM 

HONEYWELL GCOS GMAP Syst. Prog. - West Coast SM 

HONEYWELL Level 6 (DPS-6) Data Comms. - MASS. SM 

IBM - Adabase/Natural P/A - Various Loc. DC 

IBM - IDMS/ADS-O P/A - Various Loc. DC 

IBM VM + UNIX/C Conversion Specialists - Midwest DC 

IBM IMS DB/DC - All Locations DC 

PERMANENTS 

We are pleased to announce the initiation of our new permanent staffing 
division and have numerous requirements for the following: 

Data Comm S/W Eng. - all Protocols - S3SS50K 
Syst Engineers - IBM PS-2/UNIX/DPS6/COMPAQ - S32-S48K 
IBM RPG Ill/Syst. 38 Prog A P/A - S30-S35K 
Director of QA - SQA A Corporate Product 
Improvement Exp. - To $80K 

Graphics and Comp-Aided Publishing SW Eng - S30S50K 
Plu* many more software A DP openlnga. 

To apply, please eend your resume to Trident Computer Services, 
33 Boston Post Road, Marlborough, MA 01752 for the attention of the 
relevant contact above. 

Or call (617) 460-0287. 


SG 

SG 

SG 

SG 

SG 


□ouuono y 

lilklDLXT 

G>mpi iter Services inc. 


Get your money’s worth. 
Computerworld 
will lower 
your cost-per-hire. 

When you’re looking to fill MIS/DP positions, 
there’s really only one place you need to ad¬ 
vertise. Computerworld. 

In every major market, Computerworld 
reaches more data-processing professionals 
than the local recruitment media. And we 
reach them for less. Over 600,000 computer- 
involved professionals receive Computer- 
world every week. That’s more than any other 
computer trade journal, business publication, 
or general-interest magazine. 

Computerworld delivers quality readership, 
too. Fully 41% of our subscribers read Com- 
puterworld’s recruitment section every week. 
And 95% of our subscribers read this section 
regularly. The openings they advertised for 
cover the whole gamut of MIS/DP positions -- 
including systems analysts, computer science 
& software engineers, directors of MIS/DP, 
programmers, sales managers, and systems 
managers. 

As a matter of fact, recruitment advertising 
has made Computerworld the national leader 
in classified advertising among specialized 
business publications (according to Business 
Marketing magazine). Compare costs and the 
people reached. You’ll find that Computer- 
world is the number one medium for comput¬ 
er-related recruitment advertising. 

COMPUTERWORLD 

Classified Advertising 
P.O. Box 9171 
375 Cochituate Road 
Framingham, MA 01701-9171 


78 


COMPUTERWORLD 


AUGUST 10, 1987 















































EMPLOYMENT TODAY 


Data Processing 


INFORMATION 

RESOURCE 

MANAGEMENT 

We're looking for IRM professionals who want to expand their 
horizons by working in a very sophisticated Data Processing 
environment for one of California's most progressive high-tech 
companies. 

Administration Manager 

Direct and coordinate all IRM training and the capital asset 
budget, including overseeing of staff, facilities and system 
support, and program management. You will interface with 
other departments to verify training scheduling and atten¬ 
dance verification as well as provide program control for 
development analysis, design and computer programming 
support of departmental automation. Will also administer all 
departmental personnel reports and EEO/APP activities. BA/ 
BS in Business Administration or equivalent required, with 
course work in human resource management and CS pre¬ 
ferred. Must also have 3+ years management experience 
with a record of software development program management 
success. 

Standards and Procedures Manager 

Provide overall direction, development and publishing of IRM 
standards and procedures including documentation analysis, 
document preparation and distribution, records management 
and publication and presentation development. You will also 
supervise and direct technical writing and production staff. 

Requires BS/BA in Communications or Administration with 
emphasis on business systems desirable. Experience in 
management and document security training, and well devel¬ 
oped presentation and communication skills are preferred. 

Please send your resume to: 

Information Resource Management 
Dept. 331 MBW 
P.O. Box 76387. 

Los Angeles, CA 90076 

U.S. Citizenship required. Equal Opportunity Employer M/F/H/V. 


SR. PROGRAMMER 
ANALYSTS 

If you're an aggressive type individual who prefers taking 
charge to taking orders, then you need to consider Armour 
Pharmaceutical We're a world leader in specialized scientific 
products and a unit of the Rorer Group, Inc. The possibilities 
and environment are now more dynamic then ever in our 
medium size shop as we pick up additional functions from 
corporate. 

Positions involve new development and maintenance in 
support of MRR purchasing, finance and a variety of other 
applications. Candidates should have at least 3-7 years of 
related experience with significant COBOL knowledge. A 
background in a manufacturing environment and with Unisys 
'A' series hardware is preferred Experience Unisys MCR DMS 
II, GEMCOS/COMMS and on-line systems is also preferred. 

Our 700 employee advanced manufacturing facility offers a 
fast-paced growth and non-smoking environment, plus 
attractive salaries and benefits, including relocation program. 
We're located within easy access to Chicago and less than 30 
minutes from some of Chicago’s finest suburbs. If you want to 
join an environment where you can contribute more, send 
resume with salary history and requirements in confidence to: 
John S. Davlantes/Manager, Personnel Administration, 
Dept. CW8-10. 

Armour Pharmaceutical Co. 

PO Box 511, Kankakee, IL 60901 

Equal Opportunity Employer 

Armour hires only United States citizens and 
lawfully authorized alien workers. 




System Developers 

800-231-5920 

Inviting resumes from individuals in the more highly technical computer 
related vocations such as: PHD Computer Scientists, Operating Sys¬ 
tem Developers, Data Base Developers, Porting Specialists, Networks 
and Telecommunications, Architecture, Artificial Intelligence, Graphics 
Systems Developers, Mioecoders and Firmware Developers, Com¬ 
piler Development, etc. Special interest in emerging technology such 
as novel architecture, UNIX, ADA, etc. Similar interest in scientific 
applications developers including military, process control, data acqui¬ 
sition, telemetry and communications, CAD/CAM, simulation and 
modeling, etc.—-we are a professional employment firm managed by 
graduate engineers. Fees are paid by the employer. All geographic 
locations. Send resume or call D. A. Redwlne and ask for our free 
resume workbook & career planner. 


0 


Scientific Placement, Inc. 


P O Sox 19949 CW 


Houston. TX 77224 713/496-6100 

UNIX is a trademark of Bell Labs 




B 


YOU CANT 

IDO THAU 


uild a UNIX* operating system with the capabilities to handle mainframe power and the 
capacity to handle hundreds of mainframe users? 


w 


“IMPOSSIBLE!” 


most companies would say. 


But not Amdahl. As a leader in the development, manufacture, sales and support of general 
purpose and scientific computer systems, storage products, communications systems and 
software, we search for the finest quality talent in the field. We are currently seeking operating 
systems development professionals to join our UTS** development team in the following areas. 

PERFORMANCE MEASUREMENT 
TOOLS DEVELOPERS 

VAII pHU ^ es '9 n ’ implement, test and maintain UTS** performance monitoring and 
I UU uHll measurement tools as well as developing capacity planning tools for 
Amdahl’s 5890 mainframe Duties will include analysis and measurement of system I/O activity 
and internal kernel data flow. Experience should include 5+ years’ performance measurement and 
optimization of large systems. Knowledge of operating systems architectures and understanding of 
UNIX* and/or large systems also a plus. Position also available in performance certification. 
Experience should include 5+ years of performance evaluation, tuning, development, and execution 
of a benchmark. 

UNIX* INTERNALS DEVELOPERS 

Vfll I PHU design, implement, test and maintain portions of the UTS** base system 
IUU On Pi for Amdahl's tightly-coupled multiprocessor system, the 5890. Additionally, 
you will develop operating systems for future processors, participate in project architectural 
planning, analysis and enhancement. Experience should include 5+ years of UNIX* operating 
system development with an emphasis on kernel level development or modification. 

MANAGER, UTS** LANGUAGES 
DEVELOPMENT 

Yf)| | PAU mana 9 e a 9 rou P of 6-8 programmers responsible for the development of 
TUU UM Pi software generation systems for UTS** software products including C, 
FORTRAN and PASCAL Must be well versed in compiler technology and interested in on-going 
advances in the languages area. Will participate in setting UTS** product direction Requires 7+ 
years' experience in a software product development environment as technical contributor, and 3+ 
years as manager or project leader. Excellent written and oral communication skills are essential 

YHII P A II enjoy the benefits and competitive salary you would expect from an 
I UU O A PI industry leader. To apply, or for further information, call BILL MCCARTHY 
at (800) 538-8460, extension 8843, or send your resume to: Bill McCarthy, Amdahl Corpora¬ 
tion, Employment Department, Dept. 8-5, P.O. Box 3470, M/S 300, Sunnyvale, CA 94088- 
3470. Principals only please 

Y ft 11 pAU call on V° ur or terminal, 24 hours a day, for job opportunities or to enter 

I UU O A PI your resume Dial (612) 941-5723 and enter the password “AMDAHL”. 


YOU CAN AT 


amdahl 

‘UNIX is a registered trademark of AT&T "UTS is a trademark of Amdahl Corporation 
Amdahl Corporation is proua to be an equal opportunity employer through affirmative action 


PROGRAMMER/ANALYST 

Variety of long term contract positions avail¬ 
able in Michigan and Alabama. Interviews for 
Alabama positions are being scheduled. Send 
resumes to Troy, Michigan Substantial bene¬ 
fits and compensation payage. Minimum 3 
years experience Minimum 1 year experience 
in any of the following: IMS DB/DC, CICS, 
DB2, COBOL. Send resume and/or call: 

C.E.S. Inc. 

(Computer & Engineering Services) 
6964 Crooks 
Troy, Ml 48098 
(313) 828-3360 

Attention DP Recruiter 


CONSULTANTS/CONTRACTORS/PERMANENT 

CW Systems Inc has immediate openings if you have experience in the 
following areas 

ADABAS UNIX 

IDMS IMS 

DB2/SQL DEC VAX 11/75 

CICS TELON 

or application experience in 
GAS ACCOUNTING 
Please call or write: 


CW Systems Inc. 
300 West 5th Street 
Suite 936 

Austin, Texas 78701 
512-469-0245 


CW Systems Inc. 

2925 Briarpark 
Suite 830 

Houston, Texas 77042 
713-781-7466 


AUGUST 10, 1987 


COMPUTERWORLD 


79 






























































EMPLOYMENT TODAY 


s 


OFTWARE 

ERVICES 


The Industry 
Leader 


AORBITRON 
V INTERNATIONALIST 



A subsidiary o< (Uj)f| 

Paid relocation, excellent benefits and salary commensurate with experience. 

Florida 

• COBOL, IMS DB/DC • PL-1, IMS DB/DC 

• FOCUS, VM/CMS • DB-2, SQL, COBOL 

• COBOL, PATHWAY, TAL, on TANDEM HARDWARE 

• COBOL, CICS, DL-1 • IDMS, ADS/0 

• RPGII or RPG III • MODEL 204 • C/UNIX 

National: 1 - 800 - 237-8181 Florida only: 1 - 800 - 282-4141 

or send resume to: Cy Dougherty, Personnel Director 

Paragon Crossing, Suite 124,11300 4th St. N., St. Petersburg, FL 33716 

North Carolina 

• DB-2 • COBOL, CICS 

• ADABAS, NATURAL • COBOL, IMS DB/DC 


( 704 ) 522-6321 


or send resume to: Bert Davis, Personnel Director 
9101 Southern Pine Blvd., Suite 200, Charlotte, NC 28217 


Senior Staff Analyst - responsible for provid¬ 
ing accurate systems sizing tools to field tech¬ 
nical staff, to help size systems for proposals 
& assist w/customer capacity planning. Must 
analyze needs of field analysts for svstems 
sizing & performance modeling tools & tech¬ 
niques. Reqs: BSCS or equiv. (equivalent to 
BS is six yrs. relevant exp ); & four years exp. 
in systems programming & analysis to include 
a minimum of three years’ exp. in sizing large 
scale transaction processing computer sys¬ 
tems; knowledge of & experience in the fol¬ 
lowing computer languages: Prolog. Lisp, 
“C”. Pascal. FORTRAN. TAL COBOL, As¬ 
sembler, MUMPS; software systems: Guard¬ 
ian. MSDOS. UNIX*. MVS. VM; communica¬ 
tions protocols: SDLC including SNAX. SNA. 
HDLC including X.25, X.400; BSO. ASYNC 
(polling & non-pollinq); file/database systems 
(internals) - VTAM, RJE, miscellaneous sys¬ 
tems; TMF. Measure. XRAY, Expand. FOX. 
Must also have experience with micro com¬ 
puter tools, spreadsheets & database sys¬ 
tems. 40 hrs./week; $48K/year. Job & inter¬ 
view site: Sunnyvale. CA. Send this ad & 
resume to Job #MLU-7530, P.O Box 9560. 
Sacramento, CA 95823-0560 not later than 
August 24, 1987. EOE 

UNIX* is a trademark of AT&T Bell Labs. 


Software Engineer-40 hrs/wk 9am - 5pm. 
Salary $33,000/yr Reqs: Bachelor of Science 
in Computer Science or equivalent (40 cr hrs 
Computer Science subjects); 2 yrs exp in the 
position or 2 yrs as a manager - systems soft¬ 
ware development; 1 yr exp in use of NOTIS 
for library automation. Duties: assist licensees 
of the Northwestern Online Total Integrated 
System for library automation in order to de¬ 
fine their hardware & software reqs & to cre¬ 
ate system tables required for the circulation, 
cataloguing, acquisitions. & public service 
functions; assist the licensees in solving their 
requirements subsequent to installation by 
modifying their programs & analyzing & cor¬ 
recting system failures; modify Customer In¬ 
formation Control System tables to accom¬ 
plish the NOTIS application & user 
requirements for licensees' teleprocessing 
network; translate NOTIS system for current 
licensees in Spanish speaking countnes of 
Venezuela, Chile, & Columbia. Send resumes 
to Illinois Dept, of Employment Security. 401 
South State St - 3 South, Chicago. IL 60605. 
Attn: Robert Felton Ref # V-IL 7146 F. An 
Employer Paid Ad. 


TANDEM 

Omni Resources is an EDP con¬ 
sulting firm and licensed employ¬ 
ment agency. We have long-term 
consulting assignments and full¬ 
time employment opportunities 
available nationwide. 

We seek individuals with experi¬ 
ence on Tandem systems at all 
levels. 

For immediate consideration, 
please send your resume to: Rod 
Mueller-CW810 

OMNI RESOURCES, INC. 

155 E. Silver Spring, Suite 207 
Milwaukee, Wisconsin 53217 
(414) 332-5252 
1-800-545-4141 Ext. 523 


ASBED AND FINANCE/MIS DEPARTMENTS 

INDIANA UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA 
invites applications for temporary positions at 
branch campus centers in Business Education 
and Law and in Finance/MIS. These positions 
are available for the Fall Semester of 1987. 
Qualifications: Candidates with master's de¬ 
gree supported by related work experience 
will be considered 

Duties: Will include teaching and advising 
business students. 

Send application, resume, transcripts and 
three references to Computer and Office Infor¬ 
mation Systems Search Committee, Indiana 
University of Pennsylvania, Indiana, PA 
15705. Telephone (412) 357-2929 Please in¬ 
dicate a preference for Armstrong or Punxsu- 
tawney Campus Review of applications will 
begin July 15.1987 and continue until position 
is filled. 

IUP is an Affirmative Action/Equal Opportunity 
Employer 


COMPUTER ENGINEER Design, test, devel¬ 
op. and modify computer hardware and soft¬ 
ware Design computer networking systems 
and applications in "C” running under the 
UNIX* operating systems utilizing TCP/IP. 
ISO/OSI reference model and Ethernet. Analyse 
and report on performance measurement and 
reliability issues in computer networks. Analyse 
and debug real-time computer software for 
state-of-the-art microprocessor system. Lan¬ 
guages required: "C". PASCAL. FORTRAN. 
UNIX-SHELL Programming Language, Assem¬ 
bler. Some projects are performed at client 
sites in various geographic locations. Minimum 
Requirements: M.S. in Electncal Engineenng or 
Computer Science. Six months' experience in 
the position offered or six months experience 
as a research project assistant (experience 
must have included real time programming). 
One course in each of the following. Computer 
networking, operating systems, computer ar¬ 
chitecture, digital microprocessor. Must have 
completed one major project in each of the fol¬ 
lowing: computer networking, operating sys¬ 
tems running under UNIX, state-of-the-art mi¬ 
croprocessor Must be willing to travel 25% of 
time, domestically 40 hours per week 9:00 
a.m to 5 p.m. $33,327 per year. Submit re¬ 
sume to Illinois Department of Employment Se- 
cunty. 401 South State Street. 3 South, Chica¬ 
go, IL 60605. Attention Mrs. S. Chalem, 
Reference #6961-S, AN EMPLOYER PAID AD 
* UNIX is a registered trademark of AT&T 


The best EDP people in 
the Bay Area pass 
through our doorway 


You can be one of them; for nearly 15 
years the best companies have relied 
on CRG to find superior data process¬ 
ing professionals to meet their needs. 
To find out what we can do for you, 
call today or mail your resume to: 
Computer Resources Group, Inc., 303 
Sacramento Street, San Francisco, CA 
94111, (415) 398-3535, or 3080 Olcott 
Street, Suite 130A, Santa Clara, CA 
95054, (408) 727-1658. 

« The Computer 
Resources 
™ ■ Group. Inc. 

An Affiliate of 

National Computer Associates 


COMMUNICATION 
SOFTWARE ENGINEER 

Must be able to design and develop sophisti¬ 
cated software for telephony switching appli¬ 
cations and Digital Transmission equipment 
(PABX) Including use of CHILL and Intel 8086 
Assembly languages. Equipment to be used 
includes IBM 3033 mainframe, IBM PC, INTEL 
M.D.S., INTEL I.C.E. Bachelor's degree in 
Electrical Engineering, Computer Science or 
related degree is required. Must have a mini¬ 
mum of one year experience in job offered. 
Advanced degree accepted in lieu of experi¬ 
ence. but must have knowledge of telecom¬ 
munications software applications. Forty 
hours per week; $35,000 per annum. 

Send resumes to: 

Job Service of Florida 
105 E. Broward Boulevard 
Ft. Lauderdale. FL 33301 
Job Order #FL 5748327 


VERMONT 

& Rural Northern New England 


• DATA BASE ADMINISTRATOR 
• PROGRAMMER/ANALYSTS 
• SYSTEMS ANALYSTS 
• PROJECT LEADERS 
• SYSTEMS PROGRAMMERS 
3-5 years Manufacturing, Insurance or Bank¬ 
ing experience & IBM 43XX DOS/VSE, 30XX 
OS/MVS, COBOL, BAL, BASIC, CICS, IDMS; 
S/36 RPGII, S/38 RPGIII. HP3000, DEC, Da- 
tacomm, Lifecomm, Vantage. Fee paid Sala¬ 
ries $18 to 45K plus relocation assistance. 
Please send resume in confidence to: 


John Hodska. 

EDP PLACEMENT ASSOCIATES 

PO Bax 1277C Stowe Vermont 05672 
|802) 888-5601 


VAX HARDWARE/ 
SOFTWARE ANALYST 


Carolina Power & Light Com¬ 
pany is a Southeastern leader 
in power generation and distri¬ 
bution, serving the rapidly grow¬ 
ing Carolinas. Our extensive in¬ 
formation management capa¬ 
bilities reflect our commitment 
to a strong data processing en¬ 
vironment, resulting in a chal¬ 
lenging professional setting. 

As a VAX Hardware and Soft¬ 
ware Systems Analyst at CP&L, 
you will be working on an auto¬ 
mated distribution research 
project, using state-of-the-art 
equipment: VAX 11/780, VAX 
11/750(3), MICROVAX 2 (5). 

This position requires 3-5 years 
experience in the following: 
VAX/VMS, hardware configura¬ 
tion, VMS systems manage¬ 
ment, networking, and VAX 
clusters. A four-year Computer 
Science or Engineering degree 
is preferred. 

We offer a competitive salary 
and comprehensive benefits. 
For confidential consideration, 
please send resume with salary 
requirements to: Susie Brown, 
Recruitment Representative, 
Dept. CW8/10, CAROLINA 
POWER & LIGHT COMPANY, 
P.O. Box 1551, Raleigh, NC 
27602. An Equal Opportunity/ 
Affirmative Action Employer. 

CP&L 

■■■i Carolina Power & Light Conip.in, ■■■ 


PROGRAMMERS 


NJ/Westch 


JOBS NOW OPEN FOR 
PROGRAMMERS 

w/exp "C" applications, or internals or system 
adminstrtn, or testing or data communications 
or documentation under 

UNIX 

Call/rush resume to: DP Dept 

VOLT 

TECHNICAL SERVICES DIV 

(800) F0R-V0LT 212-309-0300 

101 Park Ave, NY, NY 10178 
An Equal Oppty Employer m/f 


PROGRAMMER/ANALYST: Convert specific 
engineering & mechanical problem formula¬ 
tions to EDP format, apply engineering & com¬ 
puter sci. principles to develop programs & 
subroutines for processing analytical & math¬ 
ematical problems & equations. Master’s de¬ 
gree in Comp Sci or Bach's degree in Comp 
Sci + 1 yr exp in engineering-related pro¬ 
gramming or analysis. Must know: COBOL, 
FORTRAN, BASIC, database mgmt & data 
communications. Must have engng. back¬ 
ground or have taken courses in engrg for 
comprehensive analysis of scientific, engrg & 
mechanical problem formulations to EDP for¬ 
mat. $30,000/yr, 40 hrs/wk Wolff & Munier 
Send resume to. CW-B4941. Computerworld. 
Box 9171, Framingham, MA 01701-9171 


PHYSICIST/ELECTRICAL ENGINEER 

The Bureau of Mines, Pittsburgh Research Center, has an immediate opening 
for an experienced individual in our computer group. This position, located in 
suburban Pittsburgh, will develop research laboratory automation systems, in¬ 
cluding the development of algorithms and methodologies, program develop¬ 
ment, integration of experimental equipment and sensors with local or remote 
computers, and recommend changes in experimental procedures when appro¬ 
priate. 

This position requires professional knowledge of the theories and principles of 
physics and a practical knowledge of digital electronics, instrumentations, com¬ 
puter interfacing, measurement techniques, communications, numerical and 
statistical analysis techniques, and fundamental principles of digital signal pro¬ 
cessing. 

This is a Federal career opportunity in the U S. Department of the Interior. Sala¬ 
ry range $27,172 - $44,579. Interested applicants should forward resumes to 
be received by 08-25-87 to: 

Bureau of Mines 

Cochrans Mill Road 
P.O. Box 18070 
Pittsburgh, PA 15236 
Attn: Personnel Office, Dan Diviney 


An Equal Opportunity Employer 



VACATION OR RELOCATION 

When we place you in a permanent or consult¬ 
ing position we reward you with 1 week in 
London or the amount towards relocation, 
your choice. We are part of a national network 
and have needs for (HIGH ACHIEVERS) in 12 
southwestern/midwestern/Califomia cities. 

• IDMS/ADSO 

• IMS DB/DC DB2 

• CICS command/macro 

• System 38P/A 

• FOCUS/financial 

ATM banking/develop. 

Forward resume and/or contact us at: 

Compustaff 
3701 Birch St. 

Newport Beach, CA 92660 
(714) 756-3267 


SYSTEMS ENGINEER 

Responsible for research and development 
design and implementation in the areas of 
electronic control systems, test and measure¬ 
ment and computer vision. Use of Assembly, 
C. BASIC and other appropriate languages 
Analysis of original system requirements, up¬ 
grade system modifications, hardware/- 
software tradeoff, performance and through¬ 
put. Customer interface and project 
scheduling/interfacing. 

Requires BS degree in Electronic Engineering 
with two years work experience or MS degree 
in Electrical Engineenng with no experience 
Must have knowledge of electronic control 
systems, computer vision. IBM PC family and 
C, BASIC and Assembly languages. 
$2800/mo. Send resume and cover letter to 
Pacific Precision Laboratories, Inc., Dept. RP, 
21018 Osborne St.. Unit 4, Canoga Park, CA 
91304. Not later than August 20,1987. 


CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING 
ORDER FORM 

Issue Date: Ad closing is every Friday, 10 days prior to is¬ 
sue date. 

Sections: Please be sure to specify the section you want: 
Time, Services & Software, Employment Today and Buy- 
/Sell/Swap. (Available upon request: Software Wanted, 
Real Estate, and others). 

Copy: We’ll typeset your ad at no extra charge. Please at¬ 
tach CLEAN typewritten copy. Figure about 25 words to a 
column inch, not including headlines. Any special artwork 
should be enclosed with your ad also. Logos must be sub¬ 
mitted on white bond paper for best reproduction. 

Cost: Our rates are $176.40 per column inch. (Each col¬ 
umn is 1 13/16”) Minimum size is two column inches (1 
13/16” wide by 2” deep) and costs $352.80 per insertion. 
Extra space is available/and billed in half-inch increments 
and costs $88.20. Box numbers are $15.00 extra per in¬ 
sertion. 

Billing: If you’re a first-time advertiser, (or if you have not 
established an account with us.) WE MUST HAVE YOUR 
PAYMENT IN ADVANCE, or a Purchase Order Number. 
Any extensions on this policy must be made through our 
Credit Department. 

Ad size desired:_ 


columns wide by. 


. inches deep. 


Issue Date(s): 
Section:_ 


Name:_ 

Company: 
Title:_ 


Address: 


Telephone: 


Send this form to: 

COMPUTERWORLD 
CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING 

375 Cochituate Road 
Box 9171 

Framingham, MA 01701-9171 

Telecopier service is available. 

Call: 800-343-6474 or 617-879-0700 
extension 739 or 740 


80 


COMPUTERWORLD 


AUGUST 10, 1987 



















































Stop waiting for the 
to reach you. 
Get your own subscription 
to COMPUTERWORLD. 


Take advantage of our low introductory rate — just 
$38.95 for 51 issues. Plus, you get 12 issues of 
COMPUTERWORLD FOCUS — each issue deals in 
depth with an important, timely topic. Upcoming 
issues include: PCs, Communications, Software, 
Information Centers and more! 

Just complete the attached order form and mail it in 
this postage-paid envelope. (The order form is in the 
front half of the issue, attached to this envelope.) 

Or for even faster service... 

CALL 

1 - 800 - 255 - 6286 .* 

And we’ll start your subscription immediately. 
Order today! 

"(In New Jersey call 
1-800-322-6286.) 








*a» 


^ORu, 

. 






& 










































EMPLOYMENT TODAY 




" 






MANAGEMENT 

CONSULTANTS 

Deloitte Haskins + Sells Manasement Advisory Services Group is 
expanding rapidly. We are looking for people to staff a large 
state-of-the-art project that involves structured design, a relational 
data base, and 4th generation development facilities. 

Programmer/Analyst Attributes 

• Data flow diagramming 

• Use of 4GL development facilities (IDEAL preferred) 

• Data base experience (Datacom/DB preferred) 

• Interactive program development (ROSCOE, TSO/ISPF) 

• Procedural language programming (COBOL, PL1) 

• IBM JCL 

Systems Analyst Attributes 

• Logical data base design 

• Application development methodologies 

• Project management 

• Programming and data base experience 

• Application testing and quality assurance 

If you are interested in working with highly motivated and 
experienced professionals in a fast-paced environment and are 
willing to travel, this opportunity may be right for you. We offer 
a competitive salary and benefits package. Please send your 
resume to: C.H. Smith, P.O. Box 81026, Chicago, IL 60681-0026. 

An Equal Opportunity Employer M/F. 

Deloitte f 
Haskins+Sells 


II 


T 

T 


DATA BASE 
ANALYST 

MSU System Services, Inc., the technical service subsidiary 
of the Middle South Utilities System has an excellent career op¬ 
portunity for an experienced Data Base Analyst. 

The position involves designing and implementing physical 
data bases for in-house developed applications as well as im¬ 
plementing and tuning package applications. This position re¬ 
quires a thorough knowledge of IMS concepts with 1-2 years ex¬ 
perience performing DBD, PSB, MFS, and ACB gens. 
Knowledge of IMS utilities including reorganizations, recovery, 
and SMU II is required. 

MSU System Services, Inc. offers an exceptional Relocation 
Package including Relocation Allowance (one month's 
salary)...Paid Moving Expenses...Paid House Hunting 
Trip. . .Mortgage Interest Differential plus Interim Living. 

For more information, call our toll free number below or send 
your resume to: Priscilla R. Crane, MSU System Services, Inc., 
P.O. Box 61000, New Orleans, LA 70161. 

1-800-231-4481 

In Louisiana call collect (504) 569-4951 


mm 

SYSTEM SERVICES, INC. 

An Equal Opportunity Employer M/F/H/V 



MIDDLE SOUTH 
UTILITIES SYSTEM 


Programmer Analyst 
System 38 


At First Interstate Services we 
have a commitment to sup¬ 
porting Model 204. And that 
commitment is growing, just 
like First Interstate. 

First Interstate Services also 
supports a set of company 
values. Values like respect, 
unity, excellence and customer 
service. That means that we 
support our people as much as 
we do our technology. 

Right now, we’re looking for 
people who know a lot about 
some exciting technology: 

Model 204 database. We have a 
lot of projects going and grow¬ 
ing on both the technical and 
applications areas at our Los 
Angeles Center. Take a look 
and see how to support a move 
to First Interstate. 

MODEL 204 
TECHNICAL SUPPORT 
Systems Analyst 

Requires 3-5 years Model 204 experience in 
an IBM mainframe environment including: 

Performance monitoring and tuning/Sys- 
tems configuration/Recovery procedures/ 
Installation and maintenance of Model 204 
Software/Problem determination and reso¬ 
lution/Capacity planning/System support of 
Model 204 DBMS/Database definition and 
development/MVS/XA architecture and 
ACF/2 helpful. 

APPLICATIONS DEVELOPMENT 

Providing support and development for Cus¬ 
tomer Information File development as well 
as applications support in other areas. 

Programmer Analyst Specialist 

Act as lead and control design for Customer 
Information File Model 204 applications. 
Activities will include coordination of all 
application design activities to insure appli¬ 
cation requirements are met. Requires: 

2-4 years experience with Model 204 applica¬ 
tion design including: 

Logical data modeling, Model 204 User’s 
Programming Language, Model 204 on-line 
applications, Physical database design/2-4 
years experience in an IBM mainframe 
environment. 



At least 3 years structured system design 
experience/Project leader or project man¬ 
agement experience helpful. 


Programmer Analyst Specialist — 

File Manager 

Perform as File Manager for all application 
database design activities for Customer 
Information File project. Activities will 
include: Providing central communications 
between project team and database admin¬ 
istrator; Analysis and design; Logical data 
modeling and Physical database design. 

Requires: 

Model 204 Release 9 0 experience or CCA 
class Model 204 Release 9.0/2-4 years IBM 
mainframe/2-4 years large scale applications 
development experience. 

Programmer Analyst 
Involved in development of Model 204 
applications for Customer Information File 
project. Requires: 

1-2 years large scale applications develop¬ 
ment/1-2 years Model 204 applications 
development experience/Knowledge of: 
Structured systems, analysis and design, 
Model 204 User Language, Model 204 on¬ 
line applications development and Physical 
database design. 

Submit all resumes to: MODEL 204 — HR 
P.O. BOX 54360, MAIL SORT G7-25, LOS 
ANGELES, CA 90054 


n 

fw First Interstate Services 


Exceptional opportunity for a Programmer Analyst to excel and grow 
with this leader in health care. We are a 170 physician multi-specialty 
clinic. 

We offer: * Attractive salary, * Outstanding benefits 

The area offers: ’ Easy access to NY and PA recreational and cultural 
activities, * Reasonable cost of living, * Excellent school systems 

Our environment features an IBM System 38 Model 40 RPG III. If you 
have two plus years experience in an online real time environment 
and want to be a part of this dynamic, aggressive, growing corpora¬ 
tion, send resume to: 


Guthrie CLINIC 


Guthrie Square 


Sayre, PA 18840 
Attn: (Personnel Director 


INFORMATION SECURITY- 
ACF 2/RACF/TOP SECRET 


RESEARCH TRIANGLE 
OPPORTUNITIES 


Prestigious consulting firm is 
looking for a strong Information 
Security Specialist who knows 
ACF 2, RACF, Top Secret or a 
similar information security pack¬ 
age. Must have prior design or 
development experience. Salary 
ranges into the upper $40's. For 
more information, call or send us 
your resume. 


Currently recruiting experienced computer 
pros with background in any of the follow¬ 
ing: IBM Cobol; CICS: IDMS: IMS. Adabas; 
Oracle; DB2. SOL: ADR Datacom or Ideal; 
PL 1; VM CMS; Nomad; Financial; Mfg.; 
Banking; ATM: UCCIF; Claims Processing; 
MRPII; MSA. MVS, ACP. IMS or CICS Sys¬ 
tems Progrs. Capacity Planners; Besl-1: 
Telecom Analysts; DB Analysts; Info Center 
Analysts; S 38 RPG III; DEC VAX Mfg or 
scientific; DG: Method 1; Spectrum 2: SOM; 
Pride Partial listing of local, regional 4 nat'l 



ROBERT HALF 

Data Processing 
7733 Forsyth Blvd. 

St. Louis, MO 63105 
314-727-1535 


fee paid positions. Call or write' 

The Underwood Group, Inc. 

3924 Browning PL. Suite 7 
Raleigh. NC 27609 
' (919) 782-3024 


COMPUTER NUMERICALLY CONTROLLED 
MACHINE TOOL SALES ENGINEER 
Send Resume To: Employment Security De¬ 
partment, ES Division, Attn: AEC No. 45940, 
Olympia, Washington 98504. Job Description: 
Demonstrate ana explain on the basis of pro¬ 
fessional engineering skill, education and ex- 
penence the principles of Computer Numeri¬ 
cally Controlled (CNC) Turning Centers, 
Machining Centers, CNC Lathes, CNC Mills 
and Fabricating Equipment, such as CNC 
punch presses and programmable press 
frames, responsible for performing time stud¬ 
ies on proper tool selection tor CNC machines 
to prospective customers by reviewing their 
processes and blue print drawings. Required 
to be familiar with cutting feeds and speeds 
for different workpiece materials as well as 
cutting tool's nomenclature, geometry and 
their different matenals and grades, i.e. HSS. 
carbides, coated carbides etc. Required to 
handle liaison with sales force and customers, 
and to make recommendations to customers 
on the operation and installation of the CNC 
machines handled by employer Responsible 
for furnishing professional expertise in the 
computer programming systems for CNC ma¬ 
chines to prospective customers Required to 
prepare budget estimates Requirements: 
Master of Science Degree in Engineering 
Technology, with emphasis on computer sci¬ 
ence. Five years of related occupation as Gen¬ 
eral Manager in charge of Sales and Engineer¬ 
ing Work Transcripts required. Salary: $2,500 
per month. Position Offers: Prevailing working 
conditions. 40 hours per week, 8am to 5pm, 
Monday through Friday. Position in Tukwila, 
WA. On the job training not offered Equal op¬ 
portunity employer. 


Manager Of 
Manufacturing 
Systems 

One of Southern California's leading Aerospace companies is 
looking for a dynamic, leadership-oriented manufacturing 
systems professional with 10 years' experience in MRP II, 
Shop Floor Control, Process Planning, Tooling, and IE 
Standards. 

This position also requires a minimum of 2 years' experience 
supervising application systems development managers and 
an equivalent background working with a distributed proc¬ 
essing architecture A Bachelor's degree in Computer Sci¬ 
ence, Math, or Engineering is essential. A Master's degree is 
highly desirable. 

Please send your resume to: 

Manufacturing Systems Manager, 

Dept. 334 MBW 
P.O. Box 76387 
Los Angeles, CA 90076 

U.S. Citizenship Required. 

Equal Opportunity Employer M/F/H/V. 


AUGUST 10, 1987 


COMPUTERWORLD 


81 


































































EMPLOYMENT TODAY 


NEW ENGLAND 


BOSTON 

PROJECT LEADERS — 
INVESTMENTS 

BOSTON area has outstanding 
oppty’s for sr. analysts w/securities 
acctg. or banking apps. devel. exp. 
Lead proj. team in major on-line ef¬ 
forts! Prev. IBM MVS, COBOL, 
CICS & excellent written/verbal 
skills req. Salaries to $50,000. 

BOSTON 

BANKING SW CONSULT. 

BOSTON based SW vendor/con¬ 
sult. seeks talented bank apps. 
specialists for diverse turnkey devel. 
or mod. & install, of pkg. products. 
Knowl. of IBM OS/MVS COBOL 
essential, w/any DBMS or CICS ex¬ 
pertise very desirable. Except, adv. 
& bonus pot ! Salary to $45,000. 

BOSTON 

PROG./ANALYST — HP3000 

Large SUBURBAN mfg./dist. firm 
seeks solid P/A for bus. apps. devel. 
team. Environ, is HP3000 COBOL 
COGNOS. Oppty. to join a Fortune 
500 firm with vis. to corp. execs. 
Salary to $32,000. 


HARTFORD 

PROJECT LEADER 

CT fin’I. svcs. firm seeking indiv. to 
install new investments banking 
sys. using IMS. COBOL/PROJECT/ 
user interface skills req'd! Full reloc. 
Salary to $50,000. 

HARTFORD 

DB2 

CT mgmt. svcs. firm req's. 2+ yrs. 
internals exp. to provide top level 
design/training to major area For¬ 
tune 500 Co’s. Excellent comp, 
package. Full reloc. Salary to 
$55,000. 

HARTFORD 

MVS SYSTEMS PROG. 

SUBURBAN HTFD. oppty. for MVS 
sys. prog, w/min. 2 yrs. exp. Oppty. 
to be involved w/perf. capacity ping. 
& VTAM/SNA installs. Excellent 
growth pot. for indiv. seeking a tech, 
challenging pos. Salary to 
$34-$43,000 


E 

t= 



EDP PERSONNEL SPECIALISTS 

Contact the Manager of any office listed below. 

lOO Summer St., Boston, MA 02110 
(617) 423-1200 

111 Pearl St., Hartford, CT 06103 
(203) 278-7170 

Client Companies Assume All Fees. 



COMMUNICATION 
SOFTWARE ENGINEER 


Must be able to develop software in CHILL 
(High Level Language) tor performing tele¬ 
phonic functions in a Private Automatic 
Branch Exchange (PABX). Design software to 
implement U S signaling systems and fea¬ 
tures, specification writing, coding and inte¬ 
grate testing Bachelor's degree in Electrical 
Engineering. Computer Science or related de¬ 
gree is required. Must have a minimum of one 
year expenence in job offered Advanced de¬ 
gree accepted in lieu of experience but must 
have knowledge of telecommunications soft¬ 
ware application. Forty hours per week; 
$33,000 per annum. 

Send resumes to: 

Job Service of Florida 
105 E Broward Boulevard 
Ft. Lauderdale, FL 33301 
Job Order #FL 5748330 


PERMANENT OR 
SUBCONTRACTORS 

Programmers 
Programmer Analysts 
Systems Analysts 

We need data processing professionals 
with three years experience in: 

• IBM, CICS. DL1, IMS DB/DC, 
FOCUS, ACP, ASSEMBLER 

• MSA Software 

• SPERRY 

• RPG III 

Please forward resume to: 

Integrated Computer 
Services Inc. 

5100 Poplar Avenue, Ste. 2518 
Memphis, TN 38137 
(901)761-7812 


COMMUNICATION 
SOFTWARE ENGINEER 

Must be able to design and develop sophisti¬ 
cated software for telephony switching appli¬ 
cations as well as test specifications require¬ 
ments such as fault localization in Saturn 
PABX Duplication of fault situation in the Sat¬ 
urn system and tracing the faults to their 
source language , USE IBM 360/370 using 
TSO/SPF and CHILL as the source language 
Develop of trouble reporting database Tor 
PC's Develop a remote TC to mainframe 
communication method. Bachelor s degree in 
Electrical Engineering, Computer Science or 
related degree is required Must have a mini¬ 
mum of one year experience in job offered. 
Advanced degree accepted in lieu of experi¬ 
ence but must have knowledge of telecom¬ 
munications software applications Forty 
hours per week. $43,000 per annum 


1000 DP Opportunities 


TANDEM/TAL Prog/ Anal (2-5 yrs) 27-36K 

TANDEM Sys Prog (3-7 yrs) 3545K 

VAX Prog/Anal (2-5 yrs COBOL Mlg Apps) 28-36K 

VAX Sys Prog (3-5 yrs VAX VMS) 3542K 

VAX Soft Engr (2 yrs+ Elec Warfare /Aero) 3040K 

UNIX r c Soft Engr (25 yrs) 3040K 

IDMSADS 0 Prog Anal (2 yrs+) 27 35K 

CICS Prog Anal (2 yrs+ COBOL MVS or DOS) 27-35K 

IMS DB/DC Prog Anal (2 yrs+) 28-36H 

ADR DATACOM-IDEAL Prog Anal (2 yrs+) 26-33K 

ADABAS NATURAL Prog Anal (2 yrs+) 28-36K 

ASSEMBLER Prog Anal (2 yrs-*- IBM Assembler) 27 33K 
S/38 Prog'Anal (2 5 yrs RPG III or COBOL) 27-33K 

S/36 Prog Anal (2 yrs-*- MAPICS RPG II) 26-32K 

PRIME Prog Anal (2 yrs+ INFO BASIC or FORTRAN) 3040K 
HP 3000 Prog Anal (2 yrs+ COBOL Mfg apps) 27-32K 
MSA prog Anal (25 yrs COBOL IBM) 28-36K 

Sys Prog (2 yrs-*- MVS or VM or IMS or CICS) 3045K 

Data Base Anal (IMS or DB2 or ADABAS or IDMS) 40 55K 
EDP Auditor (25 yrs EDP Audit) 2842K 


What do jou want’ A better opportunity a more challenging 
position a change m geographical location 7 We have the re¬ 
sources to assist you in enhancing your career Largest employ 
ment agency in Charlotte m business since 1975 150 affiliates 
and 1000 client companies 


Rick Young, CPC (704) 366 1800 

Corporate Personnel Consultants 



3705 Latrobe Drive Suite 310 
Charlotte NC 28211 



SOFTWARE CONSULTANT Design, test, de¬ 
velop and modify computer software systems, 
in particular, database management systems 
for UNIX’ based uni-multiprocessor machines 
Develop applications, tools and/or systems 
software in "C" for the UNIX operating sys¬ 
tem environment. Evaluate and coordinate 
software development for future high perfor¬ 
mance database management systems and 
human computer interfaces Computer lan¬ 
guages required: C UNIX-SHELL PRO¬ 
GRAMMING Some projects are performed 
on client sites at various geographic locations 
Minimum Requirements: M S in Computer 
Science. One course in each of the following: 
Compiler Design, Formal Languages, Data¬ 
base Management Systems and Distributed 
Systems. Must have completed one major 
project directly related to high performance 
database management systems In the UNIX 
operating system environment Must be will¬ 
ing to travel an average of 25% of time, do¬ 
mestically. 40 hours per week, 7:45 a.m. to 
4:30 p.m. $38,000 per year. Submit resume 
to: Illinois Department of Employment Securi¬ 
ty, 401 South State Street, 3 South. Chicago. 
IL 60605, Attention: Mrs S. Chalem, Refer¬ 
ence #7055-S, AN EMPLOYER PAID AD 

"UNIX Is a registered trademark of AT&T. 


Send resumes to: 

Job Service of Florida 
105 E Broward Boulevard 
Ft Lauderdale, FL 33301 
Job Order #FL 5748328 


PROGRAMMER/ANALYST: Analyze, design, 
code, test, implement & maint IDMS database 
programs for a Customer Profile Inform Syst. 
of various Int i financial co s & instit s. CcKfe- 
sign in COBOL/VSAM a CASH SWEEP SYS¬ 
TEM; a syst which allows money to be trans¬ 
ferred from IRA funds to high-yielding Alliance 
funds. Analyze the Subsystem using T ROWE 
PRICE SYST in order to redesign & process 
new syst s Maint prog reports & all docu¬ 
mentation Design screen layouts for CASH 
SWEEP INQUIRY in COBOL/VSAM using 
CICS release 1.7 Test & debug Syst. using 
EASYTRIEVE. Develop standardization pro¬ 
cedures for audit & control, back-up, recovery 
& restart. Instruct in use of syst. as well as in 
OS Utilities. 2 yrs exp. Bach degree in Math, 
Physics or Computer Sci Must have the fol¬ 
lowing: exp in database programming; 
OS/MVS; VSAM, EASYTRIEVE, COBOL, 
TSO/SPF, LIBRARIAN. IDMS; QUICKJOB, 
CULPRIT, PANVALET, CMS; IBM 4341 & 
IBM 3601. $32,000/yr, 40 hrs/wk. Pinkerton 
Computer Consultants. Inc 20 Broad St., 
Suite 1302, New York. NY 10005 Send re¬ 
sumes, Attn: A.J. 360 


PROGRAMMER/ANALYST: Analyze, 
design, develop, code, implement & 
maintain computer application for com¬ 
pany involved in the installation of a 
TPF-syst. Work w/a team to develop 
syst. Debug & enhance complicated all¬ 
computer-language syst. Develop doc¬ 
umentation of the TPF-syst & train us¬ 
ers on syst. Provide for back-up & 
recovery. 2 yrs exp. Must know the fol¬ 
lowing hardware & software: IBM 
4381, TPF-Operating Stst., ASSEM¬ 
BLER, PASCAL, BASIC, COBOL, 
FORTRAN, MICRO LANGUAGE, 
REXX. $37,500/yr., 40 hrs/wk. Spiridel- 
lis Consulting Group. 10 East 21 Street, 
Suite 1304, New York, NY 10010. 
Send resume: Attn: K.S. (366) 


SYSTEMS ANALYST 

Develop and implement computer- 
based system programs and analysis 
methodologies for scientific and busi¬ 
ness applications, using IBM main¬ 
frame and PC. BS plus two years expe¬ 
rience or MS in lieu of experience. 
Degree in Computer Science, Math, or 
Engineering, proficient in FORTRAN, 
COBOL, PASCAL, "C" languages. 
$3,000 per month. 40 hours per week. 
Job site/interview in Los Angeles, CA 
Send ad and resume to: 

CW-B4946 
Computerworld 
Box 9171 

Framingham, MA 01701-9171 


The Right Move 
Makes The Difference 


Specializing in the Search and 
Recruitment of D/P. S/W & H/W 
Professionals nationwide for 
, 14 years. 

Currently representing the 
needs of several companies 
on an exclusive basis 
(25 fo 75K) Call or 
send resume to 


157 Main Dunstable Rd. 
Nashua NH 03060 



(603) 889-0112 


CONSULTING 

OPPORTUNITIES 

•IMS DB/DC •DATACOM/IDEAL 

•IDMS/ADSO "ADABAS NATURAL 
•MODEL 204 -FOCUS 

"CICS/DL1 "COBOL or PL/1 

(minimum 2 years programming experience 
required) 

Datronics is currently staffing numerous pro¬ 
jects throughout the southern states. 

We offer top salaries, overtime pay. excellent 
benefits and paid relocation. 

Please call collect at 214/596-8200 or send 
resume with salary requirements to: Staffing 
Manager, Datronics, Inc., 1700 Alma Rd., 
Plano, TX 75075. (a suburb of Dallas). 


Harris County Data Ser¬ 
vices (Houston, Tx.) has 
positions open for Systems 
Programmers and Pro¬ 
grammer/Analysts. For full 
details, please send a de¬ 
tailed resume to: 

HARRIS COUNTY 
PERSONNEL DEPT. 

914 PRESTON, 6TH FLOOR 
HOUSTON, TX 77002 
ATTN: JOYCE CAMBRIC 


Systems Analyst: 

Full-time and permanent job is available 
in a software firm. Design, implementa¬ 
tion, maintenance, user interfacing and 
sales support of a 2-dimension and 3- 
dimension Computer Aided Design and 
Drafting System on both DOS and 
UNIX operating system, using comput¬ 
er languages such as Fortran, Assem¬ 
bly and C. Construction of mathemati¬ 
cal and coding algorithms on 
specifications. Requires B.S. in Com¬ 
puter Science and 2 years of computer 
programming experience. $23,260.00 
to start. Send resume to 7310 Wood¬ 
ward, Rm 415, Detroit, Ml 48202; refer 
to No. 33587. Employer paid ad. 


Computer Professionals 
Systems Programmers 
Analysts and 
Programmer Analysts 


IMS DB/DC; CICS (Leam OB2) To $39K 


IBM Bus Anal (MBA) To $50K 

MVS/VM Sys Prog To $48K 

P/A-FOCUS/COBOL $35K 

COBOL Prog (Train CICS) S22-29K 

ISPF Developer S45-55K 

P/A SAS/COBOL To $37K 

P/A 370 AssemtHer/ISPF To $39K 

S/A CMS/DL-1/NOMAD $26-38K 

Prog CICS/SDF To $40K 

Banking COBOL/FCL To $37K 

Sys Devel Mgr Manuf To $45K 

Sys Ana (2 yrs COBOL/MSA) $25-37K 
Sys 36-38 MAPICS To $39K 

DEC VAX/VMS Manuf $25-35K 

P/A's or DBA s (IDMS. IMS, 

ADABAS. NATURAL. 

ADR/DATACOM) To $47K 


COASTTO-COAST 


Contact RON DOERFLER 

All Fees Paid—Relocation Assistance 

pox- morris 


Computer Science 
MIS Consultants 

Arthur D. Little, Inc., a leading international 
consulting firm, has opfxxtunities available for 
bright, energetic individuals to work on a vari¬ 
ety of client assignments which include strate¬ 
gic information systems planning, data base 
modeling and design, software evaluation, 
and systems architecture We require a com¬ 
puter science degree, 1 to 4 years experience 
and familiarity with structured systems analy¬ 
sis as well as computer aided software engi¬ 
neering Send resumes to Ms. Diana B. Fa¬ 
hey, Personnel Manager, Arthur D. Little, Inc.. 
20 Acorn Park, Cambridge, MA 02140. An 
equal opportunity employer, m/f. 


Programmer 

Analysts 

The City of Scottsdale, Arizona, has an ex¬ 
cellent opportunity currently available for two 
experienced Programmer Analysts. These po¬ 
sitions require strong experience with Unisys 
(Sperry 1100) and COBOL Mapper experi¬ 
ence is desirable. One position requires 
knowledge of MSA Financial Systems. Salary 
is negotiabe based on experience. Qualified 
candidates should apply by September 4. 



212 S Tryon St./Suite 1350 
Charlotte, N.C. 28281 
Call Collect (704) 375-0600 


CITY OF SCOTTSDALE 

Human Resources 
7575 E. Main St., Ste. #205 
Scottsdale, AZ 85251 
(602) 994-2491 


Equal Opportunity Employer 


There’s No Time 
For DOWNTIME! 

And that goes 
for your business 
as well as your 
computer system! 

So, while the industry works on your system’s 
problems, let us work on your business prob¬ 
lems. Advertise in-- 

COMPUTERWORLD 

CLASSIFIEDS! 

One insertion will let a potential audience of 
over a half a million readers know what you 
are looking for or have to offer. Whether you 
are looking to recruit computer professionals, 
want to buy, sell or lease equipment, have 
computer time or services to offer, or software 
packages to sell, and more, Computerworld 
Classifieds will help you get a lot of exposure 
and get things done faster. 

The open line rate is $12.60 per line and there 
is a minimum size of 1 column by 2” at a cost 
of $352.80. We can accomodate up to 5 col¬ 
umns and depth measurement increases by 
half inch increments. 

Ads may be mailed in, cleanly typewritten, 
with a letter stating the size desired and the is¬ 
sue in which it is to be run. Our adtakers will 
take ads that require no extensive artwork or 
borders over the phone. We also provide tele¬ 
copier service. 

Any borders, logos, or artwork should be sent 
in with your ad and must be dark and clear 
enough to be reproduced. 

Computerworld comes out every Monday 
and our deadline for receiving ads is 10 days 
(or six working days) prior to the issue date 
desired. 


82 


COMPUTERWORLD 


AUGUST 10, 1987 

























































EMPLOYMENT TODAY 


SOFTWARE ENGINEER 


RDA LOGICON, a leader in the conceptualization and 
rapid prototyping of advanced systems for the govern¬ 
ment, has an immediate career opportunity available 
for a Software Engineer at our Pasadena facilities. 

The successful candidate will be responsible for devel¬ 
oping applications for a command and control system. 
Additionally, you will participate as an integral member 
of an implementation team. Familiarity with configur¬ 
ing the DEC and All-In-One office automation system 
is required. Knowledge of VAX/VMS, Fortran, C or 
ADA is strongly desired. 


RDA offers an excellent salary, comprehensive benefits 
and the opportunity to participate in highly relevant 
and technical projects. For immediate consideration, 
please forward your resume accompanied by salary 
history' to: 


RDA LOGICON 


RO. Box 9695 
Marina del Rey, CA 90295 
Attn: Ms. R. Carsner 

AAE/EOE U.S. CITIZENSHIP REQUIRED 




LOGICON 


IBM SYSTEMS SOFTWARE PROFESSIONALS 

Exceptional Tax-Free Salaries, Plus Bonus, 

Free Accommodation, Far East Trips, and more in 

SAUDI ARABIA 

The leading IBM compatible mainframe manufacturer wishes to ap¬ 
point two software professionals to support their growing customer 
base. They will be given the opportunity to configure, generate, in¬ 
stall, tune and support major IBM operating systems software in full- 
scale, state of the art configurations. 

Outstanding experts with 3-10 years experience are sought. Key 
qualifications include: 

Hands-on experience with MVS, MVS/XA. 

BENEFITS: 

Tax free salary, some married status positions, education allowance 
for approved dependents, free fully air conditioned compound living, 
transportation allowance, one month salary bonus on completion of 
the initial two year contract. Free medical and accident death insur¬ 
ance, two weeks paid leave on completion of each six months of ser¬ 
vice, free airfares (including leave flights to the Far East). 

Saudi Arabia is an ideal spot for travel to the Far East and Africa. 

Interested applicants should send a comprehensive C.V. and pass¬ 
port sized photograph and salary history to: 

Kama Enterprises, Inc. 

1515 SW Fifth Avenue, Suite 850 
Portland, Oregon 97201 
Attn: Dr. N. AIKhalidi 


INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY DEPUTY DIRECTOR 

Position serves as Deputy Director for Data Processing and Telecommunications services 
for the Department of Information Technology, which is established by the Code of Virginia 
as the central management agency responsible for providing technology services to all 
branches of State Government Major duties include: managing and directing the agency's 
Data Processing and Telecommunications service operations and hardware, software and 
telecommunications systems in support of customer agencies and institutions. Must have 
extensive knowledge and experience in the management of Data Processing and Telecom¬ 
munications service operations Exceptional interpersonal and communications skills are es¬ 
sential. 

We offer excellent benefits and relocation assistance. 

Salary range: $55,789 - $76,206. 

All applications/resumes should reference position #IT132 and must be received by August 
31.1987 Reply to: 

Department of Information Technology 
110 South Seventh Street, Third Floor 
Richmond, VA 23219 
Attention: Personnel 

EOE/M-F 


APPLIED COMPUTER ANALYST 

The Applied Computer Analyst will provide 
analysis of computing problems with regard to 
feasibility and method, consult with users re¬ 
garding their computing and statistical needs 
and aid in the development of plans to meet 
these needs; direct computer programmers 
engaged in consulting, programming, and 
teaching functions. 

Bachelors degree plus graduate work, prefer¬ 
ably a masters degree and four to eight years 
experience in programming work or an equiv¬ 
alent combination of education and experi¬ 
ence. Send cover letter and resume to; 

The University of Tennessee 
Employment Services 
804 Volunteer Blvd. 

Knoxville, TN 37996 

UTK is an EEO/Affirmative Action/IX/Section 
504 Employer 


FLORIDA CONNECTION 


P/A's Cobol. PL1, IMS, IDMS.To $40K 

S/E PLM, 8088, ADA.To $45K 

P/A‘s Burroughs IPS, Cobol To $30K 

Sr Sys Prog MVS/XA. IMS, CICS .To $45K 
Contact: Russ Bray 

P/A's DOS/VSE, CICS. DL1.To $35K 

P/A's Sys 38, RPG3, Cobol To $33K 

Sr. P/A MVS Cobol. 4GL, DBMS To $40K 


Contact: Scott Erickson 

Call for detail on other FL & SE positions. 


AVAILABILITY, INC. 
813/872-2631 
Dept. C, P.O. Box 25434 
Tampa, Florida 33622 
•Since 1969' 


COMPUTER 

SPECIALISTS 

$ 27,172 to $ 42,341 

The MILITARY SEALIFT COMMAND, 

a worldwide transportation agency 
of the U.S. Navy, seeks qualified 
professionals to contribute to the 
development of command-wide 
INFORMATION SYSTEMS and DATA¬ 
BASES, utilizing IBM compatible 
hardware/software and IDMS/R 
DBMS. Previous government em¬ 
ployment status is not required. 

Computer Specialists (GS-334-11 
and 12) will provide current technical 
guidance and analysis to the design 
of modern database structures for the 
development of information require¬ 
ments for data integrity, security, 
stewardship and relational database 
management. Strong knowledge of 
information architecture, database 
development standards, and modern 
design methodologies is required. 

To apply, send a resume or SF-171 to: 

MILITARY SEALIFT COMMAND 

Command Information Systems 
ATTN: Code M-8X 
5611 Columbia Pike 
Falls Church, VA 22041 

For further information contact: 

Mr. C. F. Mosier, 703-756-1855 


An Equal Opportunity Employer • U S Citizenship Required 


SOUTHERN 
CALIFORNIA 
OVER 500 OPENINGS 

IMS AND DB2 All Levels 

FOCUS All Levels 

Fin. Pkgs MSA, M&D, ISI, Ect. 

HOGAN and other Banking Pkgs 

ADABAS/NATURAL All Levels 

COBOL, ASSEMBLER, 

PL-1 All Levels 

DBA’s IMS, DB2, 

IDMS, ADABAS, Ect. 

SYSTEMS 

PROGRAMMING 

MVS/XA Systems Programmers 

IMS and DB2 Systems 
Programmers 

CICS Systems Programmers 

VTAM/NCP Systems 
Programmers 

VM/SP Systems Programmers 

TUNING and PLANNING Analysts 

SOFTWARE DEVELOPMENT 
ENGINEERS 

RESPONSE TIME, INC., 

EDP Search Division 
ATTN: Dept 725 
P.O. Box 54570 
Los Angeles, CA 90054 
(213)498-7884 


CADD MANAGER 
ENGINEERING 

City of Chicago Department of Public Works is 
seeking a Manager for CADD Section to coor¬ 
dinate and manage installation, usage of 
CADD System for Engineering Design Bu¬ 
reau. 

Ideal candidate will have a B.S. degree in Civil 
Engineering (Advanced degree in computer 
science highly desirable) and a minimum of 5 
years engineering design experience with a 
minimum of 1 year in Prime and/or Intergraph 
systems. 

Candidate will: 

1. Provide guidance to user groups. 

2. Supervise and schedule CADD operations. 

3. Design and conduct training programs 

4. Develop strategic plans. 

5 Coordinate consultants CADD Activities. 

Starting salary $2,400 to $3,387 per month in 
1987. City offers full range of benefits Must 
be a resident of City of Chicago at time of em¬ 
ployment. Send resume to: 

Personnel Section 
Department of Public Works 
320 North Clark Street, 6th Floor 
Chicago, IL 60602 

Equal Opportunity/a ffirma five action employer 



professionals 


—Sss 

TO CON 


^"'"systems 

iti° ns ’'* 9 a°d amt)A» 0U ® JJ, gr0 wtP- 

exerting' 009 ' n a0 dd e ^ e ' op ' 

n ot this ex yhedes'9 nat "\ \n’. 

c inMoWing^® a Vionse*' sX ' n 

Sff &*"<£*&** 

HAB ItlaVa. $t°o \\\0 

A ^UMB | plORID A 

tallahasse^ 


A LL degree 6 -„ce using 

a „d 

eiyWs ' n n develop 

^e" 6 t a ^9 6 ^ m “ta" 6re ' OCa ' 

leS^sr" 39 

ran ° e , d c*> 6 ‘ 66 ' eS fan 

TE C otters we 6U a iert »ene« s ^ elop - 

„ m peeea» 0 "' e ( 6 proles*"* um e 

,C o. r t n luire »0° 2 STo. 

^ 30328, 


SMITHSONIAN INSTITUTION 
DIRECTOR OF INFORMATION 
RESOURCE MANAGEMENT 

The Smithsonian Institution is seeking candidates for the position of 
Director, Office of Information Resource Management, Washington, 
D.C. Salary range $63,135 to $72,500 per annum. Responsibilities in¬ 
clude all aspects of developing, implementing, coordinating, and man¬ 
aging an Information Resource Management program for the institu¬ 
tion. Candidates must have broad knowledge of Information 
Resource Management principles and techniques; demonstrated 
ability to manage the acquisition and implementation of automated 
systems for information management; knowledge of information re¬ 
quirements of large and complex organizations and of current infor¬ 
mation technologies associated with computer and communication 
systems; and demonstrated administrative and managerial ability. 
The closing date for applications is October 15, 1987. Send a Stan¬ 
dard Form 171, Personal Qualifications Statement, and Curriculum 
Vitae to: 

Employment Office 

Smithsonian Institution 

Washington, D C. 20560 
Attn: MPA-EX-02-87(A) 

For further information, telephone: 

Ms. Toni C. Lake 
(202)357-1354 

An Equal Opportunity Employer 


AUGUST 10, 1987 


COMPUTERWORLD 


83 

























































EMPLOYMENT TODAY 


Experienced Programmer/Analysts 


CALL 
US.. 


- fc G^' NG 

0 Vl*A**' 

SOPHISTICATED LIFESTYLE 


$U ^Y SOUTHED 
SCf M/C 
*/ S »- 


CLIMATE 


O* 


r He 






*o Ul 




'»r A 






X 




TO 


r »l: 




°CE. 




A/v 


°t/| 


'*0 


COME HOME TO ATLANTA 

M.I.S. International, one of Atlanta’s most dynamic 
consulting firms is enjoying exceptional growth making this 
a perfect time to step up to a permanent position on our 
technical staff. 

We are interested in professionals with at least 2 years 
experience in the following: 

• CICS, COBOL • SYS. 38, COBOL/MAPICS 

• IDMS ADS/O. COBOL • DEC VAX/VMS 

• DB2 • DATA GEN. BASIC/STS, 

OR COBOL 

We offer competitive salaries, excellent benefits, relocation 
assistance and more. 

Join us in the heart of Dixie ..it’s terrific! 

For more information contact: Marie Clark at 1-800-521- 
2144 or send your resume to M.I.S. INTERNATIONAL, 
Corporate Headquarters, 23380 Commerce Drive, 
Farmington Hills, Ml 48024. 



INTERNATIONAL INC 


COMPUTER SOFTWARE ENGINEER. De¬ 
sign, develop, test, and modify computer sys¬ 
tems software applications and tools in "C" 
running under the UNIX 1 operating system 
Test, evaluate, and develop network proto¬ 
cols including TCP/IP and NBS TP4/TP2. De¬ 
sign compilers and database systems Evalu¬ 
ate the UNIX operating system and design 
subsystems within the operating systems ker¬ 
nel and at the application level to enhance and 
extend the functionality of the system. Some 
projects are performed on client sites at vari¬ 
ous geographic locations Minimum Require¬ 
ments: M S in Computer Science One year 
experience in the position offered or one year 
experience as a research or teaching assis¬ 
tant. One course in each of the following: 
Computer Architecture, Compiler Design, 
Software Engineering, Database, Operating 
Systems and Programming Languages. Must 
have completed one major project m each: 
computer network protocols, UNIX operating 
system internals, compiler design Must be 
willing to travel an average of 25% of time, do¬ 
mestically 40 hours per week 9:00 a m. to 5 
p.m. $35,000 per year Submit resume to: Illi¬ 
nois Department of Employment Security, 401 
South State Street, 3 South, Chicago, IL 
60605, Attention: Mrs. S. Chalem, Reference 
#6960-S, AN EMPLOYER PAID AD 

* UNIX is a registered trademark of AT&T. 


SYSTEMS ANALYST - Design and de¬ 
velop financial and accounting software 
packages: test and debug software; in¬ 
terface hardware and software. Provide 
system/user support. Program on IBM 
System 38 in RPGII, COBOL, PL/1 and 
BASIC, implement graphics, PC con¬ 
nectivity and office automation. Bache¬ 
lor's degree in Accounting or Computer 
Science. 2 years experience doing 
above or 2 years as systems engineer 
performing above. 40 hours per week 
(9am-6pm), $50,000 per year. Mail re¬ 
sume: Colorado Department of Labor 
and Employment, 600 Grant Street, 
Suite 900, Denver, CO 80203-3528. 
Ref JO# CO2860478. 


When you compare costs 
and the people 
reached, Computerworld is 
the #1 medium 
for computer-related re¬ 
cruitment advertising. 
Place your ads today! 
Call toll-free 

800-343-6474 
In Massachusetts 

(617) 879-0700 


COMMUNICATION 
SOFTWARE ENGINEER 

Must be able to develop sophisticated soft¬ 
ware for telephony switching applications 
such as the DMI (Die 
Use of f 

ic analyzer and INTEL ICE (In l 
tor). Bachelor s degree in Electrical Engineer¬ 
ing. Computer Science or related degree is 
required. Must have a minimum of one year 
experience in job offered Advanced degree 
accepted in lieu of experience but must have 
knowledge of telecommunications software 
applications Forty hours per week; $37,000 
per annum. 

Send resumes to: 

Job Service of Florida 
105 E Broward Boulevard 
Ft. Lauderdale, FL 33301 
Job Order #FL 5748329 


SYSTEMS ENGINEER: Full-time position to 
work in Central Ohio tor a software consulting 
firm Duties involve software development for 
telecommunications applications No expen- 
ence required. Qualified applicant must have 
an M.S. in computer science and a B.S. in en¬ 
gineering (any field). Must have written 2000 
lines of C language on UNIX at applications 
level and 1000 lines at the kernel level. Must 
have developed a relational data base in a 
UNIX environment. Must have taken an ad¬ 
vance graduate-level course in DBMS (Data 
Base Management System). Must have taken 
a graduate level course in computer networks 
including, as part of course, satisfactory com¬ 
pletion of a project involving protocol imple¬ 
mentation based on OSI (Open System Inter¬ 
connection) Model Must have independent 
research proficiency as demonstrated by pub¬ 
lication of research work in a professional or 
academic publication of research work in a 
professional or academic publication. 40 
hrs/wk Salary: $38,000 yearly. Send Resume 
and abstract of publication to M. Rush, JO 
#3038946, Ohio Bureau of Employment Ser¬ 
vices, P.O. Box 1618, Columbus, Ohio 43216. 



PROGRAMMER/ANALYST 

Major manufacturer located near Char¬ 
lotte is seeking individual with minimum 
3 years experience in on-line COBOL 
programming and systems design. 
Data General AOS/VS MV Series back¬ 
ground a definite plus. Database 
(DBMS) experience also helpful. Please 
send resume including salary history in 
confidence to: 

Brenda Warren 
Director-Employee Relations 
Intercraft Industries Corporation 
P.O. Box 1227 
Statesville, N.C. 28677 

EOE 


SUNBELT LOCATIONS 

• CHALLENGING OPPORTUNITIES 

• PROFESSIONAL ENVIRONMENTS 

• CAREER ADVANCEMENT 

• QUALITY OF LIFE 

• RELOCATION & FEE PAID 


IBM 


TANDEM 


VAX 


COBOL • IMS DB/DC • DL 1 
CICS • IDMS/ADSO • UNIX 
ORACLE • PATHWAY • TAL 

SARAH RHODES, DPS 

Phillips Personnel Services 

PO Box 4245 
Rock Hill, SC 29731 


Analyst/Programmer - Analyze 
users needs; design and de¬ 
velop telecommunications ap¬ 
plications, software products, 
databases. Use IBM 4341, C, 
UNIX, IMS. Bachelor’s degree/ 
Computer Science. 1 year ex¬ 
perience. 40 hours per week. 
$30,000 per year. Mail re¬ 
sume: NYS Job Service, JO 
#NY8017925, 250 Scherme- 
horn St., 3rd Floor, Brooklyn, 
NY 11201. 


SYSTEMS 

PROGRAMMER 

CW Transport, a major transportation compa¬ 
ny located in central Wisconsin, has an imme¬ 
diate opening lor a systems programmer Ex¬ 
perience and qualifications should include a 
minimun of 2 years experience in operating 
systems programming on an IBM mainframe 
and a working knowledge of DOS/VSE. SP, 
CICS, ASSEMBLER. VSAM. VTAM. and 
BTAM Send resume to: 

Director of MIS 
CW Transport Inc. 

610 High St. 

Wisconsin Rapids, Wl 54494 
Tel. # (715) 424-4500. 

EOE 


MEMBER OF RESEARCH STAFF (Computer 
Science): Design and develop innovative CAD 
software tools to provide new ways for circuit 
designers to take advantage of present and 
future capabilities of VLSI technology RE¬ 
QUIREMENTS: Ph D. in computer science or 
physics and 2 years experience in computer 
aided design including extensive design of in¬ 
teractive graphics interfaces for both Input 
and output Must have thorough knowledge 
of high level strongly typed languages and of 
techniques in graphics editing Must have 
used new and undocumented software tools 
an dworked closely with circuit designers 
Must have a strong background m physical 
sciences. Must have demonstrated ability to 
do research in areas of large systems. 
$4200/mo Palo Alto. CA. References re¬ 
quired If offered employment, must show le¬ 
gal right to do work Send resume to: Reply to 
CW-B4944, Computerworld, Box 9171, Fra¬ 
mingham, MA 01701-9171. E.O.E. 


PROGRAMMER ANALYST II 

Programmer analyst II for a Western PA com¬ 
puter software company to analyze, code, 
and test technical assignments utilizing IBM 
370 Assembler and SAS languages Partici¬ 
pate in continued upgrading of existing high 
technology productivity enhancement soft¬ 
ware products; assist in resolution of prob¬ 
lems with customer specific software applica¬ 
tions. 

Requirements: Bachelor of Science in Com¬ 
puter Science Must have experience in sys¬ 
tems programming; proficiency in IBM 370 As¬ 
sembler and SAS languages; and be 
knowledgeable of MVS internals. Two (2) 
years experience in the position or Two (2) 
years as a Systems Programmer 40 hrs/wk, 
Mon - Fri 9am-5pm, $26,600-$28.000/yr Re¬ 
ply to CW-B4945, Computerworld, Box 9171, 
Framingham, MA 01701-9171 


BUSINESS SYSTEMS 
PROGRAMMER/ANALYST 

Develop and implement computer- 
based system techniques and analysis 
methodologies for business, account¬ 
ing, and financial management. Two 
years experience with BSCS or BBA, or 
MSCS or MBA in lieu of experience. 
Knowledge of computer/programming 
(FORTRAN, "C", COBOL, PL-1) and 
accounting/financial analysis. $2950 
per month. 40 hours per week. Job si¬ 
te/interview in Fountain Valley, CA. 
Send ad and resume to: 

#CW-B4942 
Computerworld 
P.O. Box 9171 

Framingham, MA 01701-9171 


PROGRAMMER/ANALYST: Perform techni¬ 
cal functions in the developmt of the Credit 
Facility Tracking Syst for a major bank. Ana¬ 
lyze program specifications; code the pro¬ 
gram using CICS Command Level. Test the 
program according to the assigned specifica¬ 
tions. 2 yrs exp or 2 yrs rel exp as a Syst. 
Prog/Syst Analyst. Bach deg in Math, Physics 
or Computer Sci or the teaching of these sub¬ 
jects. + Must know: IBM 3083 w/ OS/MVS/- 
XA operating syst, COBOL, CICS/COM- 
MAND LEVEL. VSAM FILES. PANVALET & 
other OS UTILITIES. $32.000/yr. 40 hrs/5 
days/wk Pinkerton Computer Consultants, 
Inc. 20 Broad St, Suite 1302, New York, NY 
10005. Send resume att: AJ#060. 


PROGRAMMER/ANALYST: Respons for de- 
velopmt/mairrt of software programs for man¬ 
aging memory allocation to optimize memory 
usage, multi-screen handling & window con¬ 
trol Design database handling through tree- 
structure procedures for various bsns syst s 
such as invoice, billing & multi-user network. 
Define syst reqt's, data structures, data con¬ 
version procedures & syst's, back-up & recov¬ 
ery. Test & debug programs & prep syst's 
flow diagram. 4 mos exp req'd Master's in 
Computer Scl or Computer Info Sci. Must 
know: C. PL/1. UNIX & a background in data¬ 
base mgmt using relational database syst & 
tree structure analysis. $30,000/yr. 40 hrs/wk 
Octicomp. Corp. 622 Broadway, Suite 5D, 
New York, NY 10012. Send resume, Att: Ma¬ 
ria. 


Managers Operations, quality control. 
Exp: 2 yrs as manager Or as system 
operator. Advise new hardware instal¬ 
lation, check contract, assign duty, 
train system operators, supervise im¬ 
plementation/program, advise system 
shut down date, prepare report/solu¬ 
tion. Basic knowledge IBM systems 36 
& 38. Use beeper, available 24 hrs/wk 
for computer emergency. Work: 8-5 
PM. $4,503/mo. Willing wk wkend o/t 
@ 1 Vi time. Woodland Hills, CA for job- 
/ interview. Send ad/resume to job FC 
7107; P.O. Box 9560, Sacramento, CA 
95823-0560 not later than 8/25/87. 


BURROUGHS 


Immediate opportunities throughout 
the country for Programmers. Program¬ 
mer Analysts, Systems Analysts, and 
Systems Programmers. Several addi¬ 
tional immediate opportunities for indi¬ 
viduals with LINC. To confidentially ex¬ 
plore new career opportunities, rush a 
resume or call Gary Repetto, CPC. 


DUNHILLOF 

ALBUQUERQUE, INC. 


1717 Louisiana NE, Suite 218C 
Albuquerque, NM 87110 
(505)262-1871 

Exclusively Employer Retained 


COMPUTER SYSTEMS ANALYST Will ap¬ 
ply principles of management and information 
systems and Computer Science to analyze 
and improve existing computer programs. Du¬ 
ties also include designing, coding and imple¬ 
menting new computer programs as well as 
debugging and recommending changes to ex¬ 
isting programs. Will consult with clients and 
analyze their respective needs for optimum 
performance of Information Systems. Duties 
also entail operation research. Salary $26,776 
per year, basic 40 hour week, (9:00 am-6:00 
pm) Requirements, high school graduate: 6 
years college with Master's Degree in Com¬ 
puter Science; 6 hours course work in Opera¬ 
tions Research. Send resume: MESC, 7310 
Woodward Ave , Room 415 (Reference No. 
32387) Detroit, Ml 48202. Employer paid ad. 


COMPUTERWORLD 
CLASSIFIEDS WORK! 

• EMPLOYMENT TODAY 

• BUY SELL SWAP 

• TIME, SERVICES & SOFTWARE 

• REAL ESTATE 

• BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIES 

• SEMINARS/CONFERENCES 

• BIDS AND PROPOSALS 

It’s easy to advertise in COMPUTERWORLD. If you 
don’t have an advertising agency to supply us with 
copy, layout and order, or a camera ready mechanical, 
stat or film negative of your ad, just call our ad-takers at 
1-800-343-6474. They will be glad to take your ad and 
typeset it in available fonts at no extra charge. If you 
have lengthy ads that require logos and artwork, just 
send a clean typewritten copy of your ad to the classi¬ 
fied advertising department at COMPUTERWORLD 
(telecopier service is available); note the ad size you 
want; and, if you want your company logo to appear in 
your ad, please be sure to include a camera-ready copy 
with your insertion order. You should also supply any 
special borders, headlines and artwork that you want in 
your ad. Our Art Department will follow your suggested 
layout as closely as possible if you wish to send one. 

Ad closing is every Friday, 

6 working days prior to issue date. 

Rates: Open rate is $176.40 per column inch. Columns 
are 2” wide. Minimum ad size is 2 column inches (1 col¬ 
umn wide by 2 inches deep), and costs $352.80 per in¬ 
sertion. Additional space is available in half-inch incre¬ 
ments. Some sample sizes and costs are shown. 

1 col x 4” - $ 705.60 

2 cols x 4" -$1411.20 
2 cols x 5” -$1764.00 
2 cols x 8” - $2822.40 

Discounts are available when you run more than 35 col¬ 
umn inches of advertising in a year anywhere in Com¬ 
puterworld. Box Numbers are available, $15.00 per in¬ 
sertion. 

To reserve space for your ad, or if you’d like more infor¬ 
mation on Classified advertising in COMPUTER- 
WORLD, call our office nearest you. 

Boston - (617) 879-0700 
(800) 343-6474 

Los Angeles - (714) 556-6480 

TELECOPIER SERVICE - 
(617) 879-0700 
or (800) 343-6474 

ext. 739 or 740 


84 


COMPUTERWORLD 


AUGUST 10, 1987 











































EMPLOYMENT TODAY 


DATA PROCESSING 
PROFESSIONALS 

BROADWAY & SEYMOUR is a prestigious national consulting firm and 
a recognized leader in providing state-of-the-art solutions to a wide diver¬ 
sity of data processing needs. 

We now have career opportunities available in St. Paul, Minnesota 
(Roseville area) for the following: 

PROGRAMMER ANALYSTS - with a PL/1 type language (Pascal, PL/s, 
“C”, ALGOL), VM/CMS and REXX or EXEC2 experience. 

PROGRAMMER ANALYSTS - with IBM, OS/ MVS and TELON experience. 

DEC VAX SYSTEMS PROGRAMMER - with capacity planning'experi- 
ence and good communication skills. 

We offer competitive salaries and a comprehensive benefits package 
that includes medical, dental, long-term disability and life insurance. 
For immediate, confidential consideration, please send your resume to: 

Fred Brillante 

Director of Human Resources 



Broadway & Seymou r, Inc. 

Leaders in Information Systems and Services 


302S. Tryon Street Charlotte , NC 28202 


An Equal Opportunity Employer M/E 


DATA PROCESSING 
MANAGER 


DURACELL, the world's leading manufacturer of premium high per¬ 
formance batteries, has an immediate opening for a Data Processing 
Manager at its Lexington, North Carolina location. 

Successful candidates should possess a four year degree in one of 
the following disciplines: Business, Data Processing or Computer 
Science. A minimum of 4 years data processing experience in a 
manufacturing environment and 1 year supervisory experience is 
necessary. Must be proficient in Mapics and Business systems sup¬ 
port. IBM Systems 34, 36 or 38 experience required. Experience 
with RPG III, Basic, Cobol languages: PC support (hardware & soft¬ 
ware) and spreadsheet and data base software. 

Duracell offers a competitive salary and benefits package including a 
comprehensive medical, dental and life insurance program Take 
this opportunity to further your career with an industry leader by 
sending your resume with salary history, in confidence, to: Staffing 
Manager, DURACELL, USA. 305 New Highway 64 East, 
Lexington, NC 27292. An equal opportunity employer M/F/H/V. 


LONG TERM, 
LUCRATIVE 
CONTRACTS 

IMMEDIATE OPPORTUNITIES 
IN THESE SPECIALTIES 
AND MORE: 

# STRATUS SPECIALISTS 
e VAX/VMS/C/BROKERAGE 
e ADR DATACOM/IDEAL 

e DB2DBA 

# DB2 DATA DICTIONARY 
e DBA STANDARDS, 

MODELLING 
e IDMS IDD SPECIALIST 
e IDMS PERFORMANCE/ 
TUNING 

# DB2/CICS 

e VM SYS PROGS/PROFS 
e IDMS/ADSO/CICS/BATCH 

CALL 

212 - 766-4400 

Mary Beth Walsh * John Williams 

SPECTRUM 

CONCEPTS 

150 Broadway, NY, NY 10038 


ASSISTANT DIRECTOR 
OPERATIONS ANALYSIS 

The University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics, a 
progressive tertiary level health care center, 
has an available position as Assistant Director 
of the Operations Analysis (Management En¬ 
gineering) Division in the Information Systems 
Department 

This position requires a Masters degree In 
management engineenng or related discipline, 
or an equivalent combination of education and 
experience. Candidates should possess rea¬ 
sonable experience (3-5 years) in manage¬ 
ment engineenng applications as well as ex¬ 
tensive experience in systems design and 
analysis. 

Salary is competitive with liberal fringe bene¬ 
fits. and our location offers the cultural, recre¬ 
ational and educational benefits of a Big Ten 
university community. Send resume, refer¬ 
ences and salary history to: 

Nancy R. Dyer 

Information Systems 
Department 

University of Iowa 
Hospitals and Clinics 

Iowa City, IA 52242 

The University of Iowa is 
an Equal Opportunity 
Affirmative Action Employer. 


NO JOBS... 

CAREERS 


Programmer 

Analysts 


A\ 


Merit 


National Headquarters 
5800 C/oote Road 
Sole 20OCWE7 
Troy Michigan 48098 


A solid career path 
for creative, moti¬ 
vated professionals 
who enjoy success 
and have two years 
of experience in: 

• IDMS ADS/O 
‘ IMS OB/DC 

• DB2 SOL 
•HOGAN 

Join Merit Systems, a 
leader in Professional 
Services for the past 
ten years. For im¬ 
mediate confidential 
consideration, call 
collect or send your 
resume to: 

Jim Whiteford 
(313) 879-7600 


O bu rv oo t vy froowf 

m Coelutes *Drti tor Buomoia 

At equal opportunity unpw 


PRODUCT SUPPORT ENGINEER - Will per¬ 
form product support engineertng duties in 
connection with support of advanced telecom¬ 
munication systems and products of employ¬ 
er. PBrform electronic systems analysis and 
design duties Support and maintain telecom¬ 
munications packet switching data equipment 
and maintenance of software products in sup¬ 
port of advanced telecommunications sys¬ 
tems as part of product development/support 
staff. Bachelor's of Science Degree in Electri¬ 
cal or Electronics Engineenng required, with 
2V> years experience in the job offered or 2 Yi 
years experience as a Technical Service Rep¬ 
resentative. In lieu of Bachelor s of Science 
degree and 2Vi years experience as Technical 
Service Representative, will accept candidate 
with a 2 year degree in Electronics Engineer¬ 
ing Technology and 4 '/2 years experience as a 
Technical Service Representative. The 2Vi 
years of experience must have involved tech¬ 
nical support, software design, and design 
maintenance of PABX Systems (Private Auto¬ 
mation Branch Exchange) 40 hours, M/F, 
8:00 A M. - 5 P.M., $31.500/year. Send re¬ 
sume and social security number to Illinois De¬ 
partment of Employment Security, 401 South 
State Street - 3 South, Chicago, IL 60605, At¬ 
tention: Robert S Felton. Reference #V-IL- 
7157-F. 


Imagine 

Working In A Company With Innovative Products 
Resulting In A Compound Annual Growth Rate of 100%. 


At QMS, we create, manufacture and market in¬ 
telligent graphics controllers for laser printers. We 
also offer an extensive line of impact printers used in 
industrial graphics and barcode labeling applications. 

Our 10 year history of solving tough printing 
problems in die impact and non-impact worlds, has 
resulted in a rapid growth of nearly 100% per year 
and a reputation as a dynamic, innovative corpora¬ 
tion. 

Senior Level Engineers 
Engineering Managers 
Program Managers 

To continue our growth in this explosive market, 
we have immediate positions available for individuals 
preferably from a larger commercial electronics 
company. Your 8+ years experience will provide 
leadership to a young, energetic, engineering staff. 
BSEE/BSCS required. Advanced degrees preferred. 


A few positions are available for outstanding in¬ 
dividuals with less experience. 

QMS representatives will be interviewing for: 

Engineering Managers, Hardware Engineers, 
Software Engineers, Quality Assurance 
Engineers, Mechanical Packaging Engineers, 
Product Publication Manager, Documentation 
Specialist. 

Applicants should be familiar with most of the 
following: Structured Programming, UNIX, C, 
68000, Microprocessor Family Design, PAL 
Design, RIP Design, CAD/CAE, Worst Case 
Design Analysis/Simulation, PERT, MTBF 
Analysis, Surface Mount Technology. 

At QMS, our technical people make major im¬ 
pacts on the success of the corporation. Please send 
resumes to: Ted Labay, Human Resources, Dept. 
CW 8/10, QMS, Inc., One Magnum Pa99, 
Mobile, AL 36618. Equal Opportunity Employer. 


QMS 

Where Imagination Leads 


OVERSEAS 

JOBS! 

TAX FREE INCOME 

Our clients are hiring NOW for: 

PROGRAMMERS/ANALYSTS 

• IMS/CICS/ADABAS/IDMS 

• RPG II, lll/ORACLE/PCS 

SYSTEMS PROGRAMMERS 

• PRIMOS/VMS/AOS/MVS 

SOFTWARE ENGINEERS 

• CADCAM/UNIX-C 

TECHNICIANS 

• IBM MF/HP/DEC-VAX 

MANY OTHER FIELDS 

Sunday 9:00-3:00 
Weekdays 8:30-5:30 

(213) 382-9999 

OVERSEAS CAREERS 
OF CALIFORNIA AGENCY 

3701 Wilshire Btvd. 

Dept 222CW 
Los Angeles, CA 90010 

Advance fee required-refundable 
100% GUARANTEE AVAILABLE 
Licensed and bonded 
as an employment agency 

GUARANTEED RESULTS!! 


EXPERIENCED 
SYSTEMS 
PROGRAMMERS, 
ANALYSTS AND 
PROGRAMMER 
ANALYSTS FOR 
SUNBELT LOCATIONS 

Job dissatisfaction complacency, 
and frustration are the biggest 
obstacles to overcome lo achieve 
one s career goals Everyday new 
career opportunities pass us by 
because we are unaware of tbeir 
existence Let us keep you abreast of 
what your true value is in the market 
place Absolutely no obligations, 
please call or write Keith Reichle. 
CPC. Data Processing Specialist 

DunhHI 


MARTIN MARIETTA DATA SYSTEMS 


DISCOVER PROFESSIONAL CHALLENGE 
AND PERSONAL REWARD 


Martin Marietta Data Systems, Orlando, Florida, is a leader in providing 
quality data processing services. Our commitment has allowed us tremen¬ 
dous growth in the past five years and we will continue to play an integral 
part in the data processing field. Discover the professional challenges the 
following opportunities can offer: 

PftOGRAMMER/ANALYSTS— We are currently seeking several Program¬ 
mer/Analysts with the following experience: 

Two plus years progressive experience in the design and programming of 
applications using COBOL under IMS DB/DC. Experience with TSO/SPF. 
PANVALET and DB2 is strongly desired. A working knowledge of Bar¬ 
code is a definite plus. 

Two plus years Stratus FT250 (IBM System 88) experience required. 
COBOL under VOS/DOS and previous manufacturing or MRP applications 
experience a plus. 

Three plus years experience with DEC VAC hardware and COBOL under 
VMS or IMS in a manufacturing applications environment is required. 
COMETS experience is strongly desired. ■ 

SYSTEMS PROGRAMMERS- We are seeking individuals with five plus years 
systems level applications design or VM/CMS internals experience. Ex¬ 
cellent Assembler skills and experience in a CICS environment required. 
TSO under MVS and VM experience a plus. 

PERFORMANCE AND TUNING SPECIALIST— Individual will have a minimum 
of five years systems programming experience including performance and 
tuning of MVS/XA, VM/HPO, DASD I/O Tuning, JES2, MICS, and SAS. 
IBM 3084 and/or 3090 experience is also required. 

TELECOMMUNICATIONS SPECIALISTS —Candidates will be familiar with 
various modems, multiplexors and BSC/SDLC protocols. You must also 
have a minimum of two years experience in either COMTEN 3690 or IBM 
3725. 

BUSINESS MANAGEMENT ADMINISTRATOR— Qualified individual must have 
a minimum of four years finance related experience including Inventory 
Control, Standard Costing and variance analysis. You must also be 
knowledgeable in P.C. modelling. 

In addition to challenging career opportunities, we offer a comprehensive 
salary/ benefits package that’s tops in the industry, including company paid 
health, dental and vision insurance for you and your family, unique perfor¬ 
mance sharing plan and tuition reimbursement. The lifestyle in Central 
Florida is equally rewarding, with comfortable year-round climate, abundant 
recreational and cultural activities and very affordable housing. Qualified 
candidates should forward your resume along with salary history in con¬ 
fidence to: Martin Marietta Data Systems, P.O. Box 13385-A, MP 
#357, Dept. CW-810, Orlando, Florida 32859-0385 or call 
800-237-4574. We are an equal opportunity employer, m/f/h/v. 

MASTERMINDING TOMORROWS TKHNOtOG/ES 


OF CHARLOTTE. INC 

6401 Car mol Road. Suite 107 

Charlotte. North Carolina 28226 


M/I/Pr//V Af/l/7/F7Tfl 


800-438-2012 

(NC Call) (704) 542-0312 


AUGUST 10, 1987 


COMPUTERWORLD 


85 

























































“With Computerworld, 
our client’s recruitment ad dollars 

are well spent.” 



John P. Bertsch 
President 

Bertsch & Company 
Advertising. Inc. 
New York, NY 


J ohn P. Bertsch is President ot Bertsch 8c Company Advertis¬ 
ing, Inc., a full service recruitment advertising agency 
headquartered in New York, with offices in Boston, MA and 
Irvine, CA. John is often asked by his clients to recruit data 
processing professionals and where to run their ads. 

"Our clients are from varied interests — financial food, high tech 
to mention a few, " John explains. "And most of them have at one 
time or another been looking for qualified data processing 
people. Our recommendation as to where to look? Not just in the 
local and national newspapers, but in Computerworld as well ." 

"Why Computerworld? Quality. Computerworld delivers the high 
qualify responses our clients need ." 

In fact, recently one of Bertsch 8c Company's clients found Compu- 
terworld's response to be higher both in qualiity and quantity 
than the local newspaper. "As an advertising agency, we know 
we can't hire the candidate, but when we deliver the candidate 
it truly is a feather in our cap. ' And I owe the thanks to 
Computerworld. It was our recommendation and it delivered." 

"Of course, that delights us both. My agency because we 
recommended Computerworld, and the client because he knows 
that, with Computerworld, his recruitment ad dollars are well 
spent, " concludes John. 

Computerworld. We're helping employers and top professionals 
get together in the computer community. Every week. Just ask 
John. 

For all the facts on how Computerworld can put you in touch 
with qualified personnel, call your local Computerworld Re¬ 
cruitment Advertising sales representative. 


COMPUTERWORLD 

BOSTON: 375 Cochituate Road, Box 9171, 

Framingham, MA 01701-9171, (617) 879-0700 

NEW YORK: Paramus Plaza 1, 140 Route 17 North, 

Paramus, NJ 07652, (201) 967-1350 

WASHINGTON, D.C.: 3110 Fairview Park Drive, Suite 1040. 
Falls Church, VA 22042, (703) 876-5100 

CHICAGO: 2600 South River Road, Suite 304, 

Des Plaines. 1L 60018, (312) 827-4433 

LOS ANGELES: 18004 Sky Park Circle, Suite 100, 

Irvine, CA 92714, (714) 261-1230 

SAN FRANCISCO: 18004 Sky Park Circle, Suite 100, 

Irvine, CA 92714, (415) 322-33314 

An IDG Communications Publication 























EMPLOYMENT TODAY 


BUY SELL SWAP 





1-800-426-USED 

In California (714) 641'0366 


IF IBM MAKES IT, WE CAN SAVE YOU MONEY 

Series/1 
System/34 
System/36 
System/38 
43 XX 
30 XX 

Marshall LewisH 


• Top Savings 

• Quick Delivery 

• Short and Long-Term 
Leases 

•All Models & Peripherals 
•New & Used 



&. Associates, Inc. 


am 


Member Computer Dealers 
& Lessors Association 


1536 Brookhollow Drive, Building A 
Santa Ana, Ca 92705-5426 


IBM SPECIALISTS 

SELL•LEASE• BUY 

S/34 S/36 S/38 

3741 3742 


• New and Used 

• All Peripherals 

• Upgrades and Features 


• IBM Maintenance Guaranteed 

• Immediate Delivery 

• Completely Refurbished 


800-251-2670 

IN TENNESSEE (615) 847-4031 


COMPUTER MARKETING 

/ / 4^// /rrw, • iy. 

r O BOX 71 • ()10 BRVAN ST Rf IT • OLD HICKORV TENNESSEE 171 <8 


5?. 


SERIES-1 

S/34 • S/36 • S/38 
S/23 • 4300 • POS 


5555 WEST 78TH STREET 
MINNEAPOLIS. MN 55435 
612-829-7445 800328-7723 


* Buy * Sell * Lease * Rent 


IBM. Displaywriters j 


5525 - OFFICE SYSTEMS 
5219 — 5253 — 5258 

6670 PRINTERS 

SYSTEM/34/36 

CDB FINANCIAL, INC. 


3520 DILIDO ROAD 
DALLAS, TEXAS 75228 
214-324-3491 im>i cdla-nomda 


MISSISSIPPI CENTRAL 
DATA PROCESSING 
AUTHORITY 

Sealed proposals will be received by the 
CDPA, 301 N. Lamar St„ 301 Building, Suite 
508, Jackson, MS 39201 tor the following 
equipment and services: 

Request for Proposal No. 1252, due Thurs¬ 
day, August 27,1987 at 3:30 p m. for the sale 
of two DEC PDP11/70 workstations, ten IBM 
3277 CRT’s, and one 3271 controller for the 
MISSISSIPPI DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC 
SAFETY. No charge 

Request tor Proposal No. 1253, due Thurs¬ 
day, September 10, 1987 at 3:30 p.m. for the 
acquisition of a distributed processor with lull 
office automation capabilities for the WORK¬ 
ERS' COMPENSATION COMMISSION. 
Charge $10.00. 

Request for Proposal No. 1254, due Friday, 
August 21, 1987 at 3:30 p.m. for the acquisi¬ 
tion of data entry services for the MISSISSIP¬ 
PI DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WELFARE. No 
charge 

Detailed specifications may be obtained free 
of charge from the CDPA office or at the spec¬ 
ified cost by submitting a written request ac¬ 
companied by the appropriate payment, 
NOTE: Valid forms of payment are corpo¬ 
rate check on a Mississippi bank, certified 
check or POSTAL money order. NO CASH 
OR OUT-OF-STATE CHECKS. The CDPA re¬ 
serves the right to reject any and all bids and 
proposals and to waive informalities. 

Patsy Stanley @ (601) 359-2604 or 
Colleen Downing @ (601) 359-2624 


SOUTHERN DATA SYSTEMS 

7712 Lander, Avc NuhviUe, 174 37211 
(615) 244-M7I2 


where quality service It 
a classical tradition' 


SYSTEM 34 36 38 
All Related I/O 

MAINFRAME I/O 
Terminals Printers 
DASD Controllers 

S/23 DATAMASTER 
PC/XT/AT 5110/5120 
DISPLAYWRITER 

(Call U* Toll Free, Today!) 

800-251-2614 


HIGH SERIAL 
IBM 3380-D’s 
FOR SALE 

Sealed Bids will be due Thursday. August 20. 
1987 for a variety ot used IBM hardware, in¬ 
cluding the following; 

One (1) IBM 3380-AD4 DASD 
Two (2) IBM 3380-BD4 DASD 
One (1) IBM 3380-003 Controller 
Two (2) IBM 3274 Controllers 
One (1) IBM 3203 Printer 
Miscellaneous CRT's and 
other devices 
Fifty five (55) items in all 

Bid packets containing complete equipment 
descriptions and bidding requirements may be 
obtained by contacting John W Graub II, c/o 
RUBIN & LEVIN, 500 Marott Center, 342 
Massachusetts Ave, Indianapolis, Indiana 
46204-2161 (Phone 317-634-0300). 


BUY - SELL 
TRADE -LEASE 
NEW/USED 

SYSTEMS PERIPHERALS 

[»££. 1i**u &le£twuc<l. 

MA: 617-342-4210 
OH; 614-764-2224 

DEC is a Registered Trademark ot 
Digiial Equipment Corp 


CALLUS 
FOR OUR 
LEASE RATES 


800 - 243-5307 


InCT (203) 661-4200 


For the best lease rates going on IBM systems... 
from system 38’s to 3090's and everything in between. 

Randolph 

Randolph Computer Corporation 

Subsidiary of Bank ot Boston • 537 Steamboat Road, Greenwich, CT 06830 


We Buy, Sell & Lease IBM Processors and Peripheral Equipment 




Established 1969 


Computar ITkirkating Inc. 

PO BOX 0, MARGATE, NJ 08402 0430 

609/823-6000 rTMB| 

Contact/Berme Gest mttt ll 3 

Telex: 5106012293 


IBM Unit Record 
Equipment 
Data Modules/Disk Packs 



029-082-083-084-085-088- 

129-514-519-548-557-188 

2316-3336(1 )&(11 )-3348(70) 

Thomas Computer Corp. 

5633 W. Howard Chicago IL 60648 

800-621-3906 312-647-0880 


I I 


■vM 1 
1 i 




LEVEL 6 DPS 6 SERIES 16 
Complete Minicomputer Line - New & Used 

• All Peripherals and Terminals 

• Upgrades and Features 

• Depot Repair Capability 

• Honeywell Maintenance Guaranteed 

• Immediate Delivery Low Prices 

• NEW PRODUCT • 

Full Line of 

AT and XT Compatible PC'S 

The Recognized Leader in Honeywell 
Minicomputer Sales and Support 



HajORALicoMPtiTrRSEnvias 

100 Bearfoot Rd . Northboro MA 01532 
(6171 393-6839 TWX 710-347-7574 


Want To Buy 

NAS 9080 64 MB 
32 ch, XA 

Want To Sell 

NAS 9060 24 MB 
16 ch 

Pioneer Data 
Systems 

(515) 270-3604 


UNISYS®/BURROUGHS® 

BUY • SELL • LEASE • SERVICE 

• ALL A SERIES 

• ALL PERIPHERALS 

• ALL TERMINALS 

• ALL CONVERGENT 
TECHNOLOGY PRODUCTS 

• ALL BX800 & BX900 SYSTEMS 

"JUNE SPECIALS'' 

ET1100 CRT UNITS 
B9387-52 CONTROLLER 
B9494-41 207 DISK 
B1985 or B1990 SYSTEM 


UrwErsal Financial 


375 W. First St., Elmhurst, IL 60126-2692 
1-800-558-5656 (312) 279-1160 (IL) 

(305) 834-6994 (FL) (414) 541-1120 (Wl) 
MEMBER: COLA, AMDA 


COMPUTERLAND 
HP 9050A/550 and 
Associated 
Peripherals 

For Sale by owner 
with 10 televideo display stations 
and 5 dataproduct printers. 

1 IBM 3800-3 BTS unit 

All or Part 

Contact 
Dontus Bishop 
at(415)475-3124 


IF YOU'RE BUYING, WE RE SElilNG. 



FjJF ' J 

IF YOU'RE SEUiNG, WE RE BUYING. 

IBM SYSTEMS Buy • Sell • Lease PERIPHERALS 

( 800 ) 331-8283 

TOLL FREE 

( 213 ) 306-9343 

CALIFORNIA 
Ocean Computers. Inc. 

8055 W Manchester Ave . Ste 525 
Playa Del Rey. CA 90293 




4381 

IBM MEMORY 

8 Mbyte 

Increment Upgrades 

Excellent Prices 
Available Now 

800-821-0229 
818-986-2411 

El Camino Resources 



AUGUST 10, 1987 


COMPUTERWORLD 


87 


























































































BUY SELL SWAP 





New & Used 
Computers 


( 305 ) 392-2005 

TELEX 156 1249 




thomo/ bu/inc// 

@ /y/tenriA Inc. 

4301 OAK CIRCLE • UNIT 1 1 • BOCA RATON, FL 33431 



SEMINARS 


SETA 

Southeastern 

Telecommunications 

Assn. 

12th Annual conference 
Nov. 15-18 
Marriotts Orlando 
World Center 
Orlando, Florida 

i Seminars • Exhibits 

• Speakers 

For more information call: 
SETA Office 800-445-1476 


SWAPPING? 

Find the right deal in 
Computerworld classifieds. 
Run an ad offering your 
old equipment 
and 

specifying what you want. 
Read the ads from others. 

Find a dealer or 
leasing company that works 
with trades and swaps. 
Whatever you do, 
you have a good 
chance of finding what you 
want and getting rid of 
what you don’t. 

To place you ad, or to get a 
rate card 

with complete details on 
Computerworld Classifieds, 
call or write: 

Classified 

Advertising 

Computerworld 

P.O. Box 9171 
Framingham, MA 
01701-9171 
617-879-0700 


BUSINESS 

OPPORTUNITY 


CAPITAL AVAILABLE 

$1,000,000 MIN. 

Will assist with financial 
plan, for information call 
Mr. ADAMS at WESTEX 
714 / 964-2386 


BIDS & PROPOSALS 


City of New York 

Human Resources Administration 
Office of Purchasing & 
Materials Management 

INVITATION FOR BIDS 

PROVIDE HOT SITE/COLD SITE 
COMPUTER DISASTER 
RECOVERY SERVICES 

To All Prospective Bidders: 

You are hereby notified that the Human 
Resources Administration ("Agency") is solic¬ 
iting sealed bids for contract Temp. Id number 
8-0314. to supply all labor, materials, and 
equipment necessary and required for provid¬ 
ing hot site/cold site computer facility services 
to be used for disaster recovery purposes. 

Sealed bids shall be accepted by Procure¬ 
ment until 11:00 A.M.. Monday. August 31, 
1987. Bid forms and specifications may be ob¬ 
tained. free of charge, from the Bureau of Pro¬ 
curement. Contract Section. 7th Floor. 66 
Leonard St., New York. N Y. 10013 beginning 
August 3. 1987 You may contact Nicole 
Grant at (212-553-5353) if you have any ques¬ 
tions concerning the pick up of said bid book 
or to arrange for the mailing of the bid pack¬ 
age Please refer to the Temp. Id number 
v\4\en making inquiries in this matter. 


REQUEST FOR PROPOSAL 
87-230 

The County of Manatee, will receive sealed 
Proposals at Purchasing, 2908 12th St. Ct. 
E Bradenton, FI 34208 until 3:00 P.M., 
THURSDAY. SEPTEMBER 24, 1987 to select 
a firm to aid Manatee County government in 
the development of a comprehensive land in¬ 
formation system. Services requested are: Fi¬ 
nancing considerations for software, associat¬ 
ed hardware, and data base development 
costs Technical services to aid in the prepara¬ 
tion of a complete data base development 
plan, an appropriate application software 
specification in response to that plan, and a 
method for selecting a hardware vendor 
based on the resuit of the software evaluation. 

Proposal information and documents may be 
obtained from Purchasing at the above ad¬ 
dress. or by calling (813) 748-4501. Ext. 3241. 

COUNTY OF 
MANATEE, FLORIDA 


THE BULLETIN BOARD 



DEC 

BUY-SELL-LEASE 

VAX 750 2MB-VMS 

$9,900 

DHU11 

$2,895 

UDA50 

$2,200 

DEC MATE II 

$1.295 

PRO350 (from) 

$750 

DECNA 

$200 

LAI 00 PC 

$550 

MS11 PB 

$950 

MS750 CA 

$600 

MS780FD 

$250 

RX02 

$395 

DLV11E 

$95 

DLV11J 

$195 

DF03 

$75 

11/44 

$5,200 

Kennedy 9300 

$1,995 

MS 630 BA 

$395 

Rainbow B 

$1,095 

Rainbow A 

$395 

RD53 

$1,495 

RX50 

$295 

DHV11M 

$695 

DZ11E 

$495 

DZV11A 

$195 

CDC9766 

$2,200 

Digital Computer Resale 

(713)445-0082 


MERIDA TRADING GROUP 

BUYS 


SELLS 


LEASES 


All Digital Equipment 

Please Call (617)933-6790 

Merida Trading Group 


HONEYWELL 


HONEYWELL DPS6 Ultimate System 

(2) 288 MB hard disks with controllers 
32 Ports 

1600 BPI 75 IPS Tape 
1000 LPM Printer 

Plus Extras 

Gould UPS System, 16 CRT's 

Call Robert Goldstein 
(201)329-9150 


DEC 


DEC NEW & USED 
BUY - SELL - EXCHANGE 

Systems • Processors • Memory 
Options • Peripherals • Modules 

LAKEWOOD COMPUTER C0RP. 
436 Link Lane 
Ft. Collins, CO 80524 
(303) 493-6406 

FOR SALE 

VAX 785XAAE 

16 Megs Additional Memory 
Senal #84059426H FCC Cabinet 
$99,000 Installed 

Merida Trading Group 
4C Gill Street 
Woburn, MA 01601 
(617) 933-6790 


DEC 


BUY* SELL* TRADE 

Planning to buy non-DEC memory? 
Check our DEC memory prices first' 

1123-BE MS750-HB RL02-AK 
1173-BE MS780-JA RL02K-DC 
DHU11-AP MSV11-JE RLV12 
MS86-CA RH750-AA VT100-AA 

NEW YORK COMPUTER EXCHANGE 

(516)752-8666 (800)645-9109 

The Bulletin Board 
makes selling 
your 

equipment easy! 


MISC. 


NEW & USED 
RAISED FLOORING 

Immediate Delivery 
Quality Installation 
RAISED COMPUTER FLOORS 
One Charles Street 
Westwood. NJ 07675 
(201)666-8200 
Telex #13-5076 


PRIME 


TSI...YOUR FULL LINE VENDOR 
FOR ALL YOUR 
PRIME COMPUTER NEEDS 
Buy • Sell • Lease • Rent 

National 800-222-3475 

Florida 800-421-4135 

Northeast 800-874-3475 

Timesharing Services, Inc. 

4080 Woodcock Drive 
Jacksonville, FI 32207 

PRIME COMPUTER 

Buy " Sell * Lease 
Wanted Prime 9950 Systems 
Wanted Any 

Prime Computer Hardware 
Maintenance Contracts Available 

Centrex International Incorporated 
4115 Billy Mitchell Drive 
Addison, TX 75244 
(214)233-1986 Ask for George 
(800)345-7856 outside Texas 

LARGE SELECTION OF USED 
PRIME COMPUTER SYSTEMS 
...SAVINGS TO 50% 
Peripherals also available 
1st SOLUTIONS, INC. 
11460 N. CAVE CREEK RD„ 
PHOENIX, ARIZONA 85020 
(602) 997-0997 
ASK FOR DON 


Call 

to place 
your ad 
today 

(800) 343-6474 
(617) 879-0700 


ORDER FORM 

COMPUTERWORLD BULLETIN BOARD 

Issue Date: Ads can be accepted up until the Monday preced¬ 
ing the issue desired. Computerworld comes out every Mon¬ 
day. 

Classifications: Most ads will be classified according to the 
brand of equipment that is being bought or sold. These classi¬ 
fications include Burroughs, Data General, Digital/DEC, Hew¬ 
lett Packard, Honeywell, IBM, NCR, Sperry Univac, Salvage, 
Terminals, Misc. Systems and Miscellaneous. 

Copy: Copy sent in via the mail or telecopier (telecopier exten¬ 
sions are 410 and 451) should be cleanly typewritten. Ads may 
be given over the phone to our team of ad takers. The stan¬ 
dard size is 1 column by 1 inch deep. These units may be com¬ 
bined to form larger sized ads. Describe the equipment very 
briefly, give the price and the name of the person to contact. 
All ads will be set up using a standard format. No borders or 
logos are allowed. 

Cost: The price for each standard unit is $178.00 (One unit 
minimum and no fractional units allowed.) You must run 4 ads 
in one month. There are no agency commissions and no quan¬ 
tity discounts. 

Billing: Once you’ve written your ad, send (or call) it in with 
your name and address for billing purposes and we’ll run it. (If 
your company has never advertised with us before, we re¬ 
quest a check with your order.) 


Issue Date:_ 

Classification:. 

Name:_ 

Title:_ 


Company:_ 

Address:_ 

Telephone:. 


Send this form to: 

COMPUTERWORLD BULLETIN BOARD 

375 Cochituate Road, Box 9171, Framingham, MA 01701-9171 
617-879-0700 800-343-6474 


88 


COMPUTERWORLD 


AUGUST 10, 1987 

































































































DATA 

GENERAL 


MV-10000 AVAILABLE 
FOR LEASE 


12 

Complete 


disk 
& Peripherals 


The AmVest Group 

251 New Kamer Road 
Albany, NY 12205 
518-456-4567 


FOR SALE 

BRAND NEW 
IN ORIGINAL CARTONS 
MV-2000 with 4 MB memory 
70 MB disk, 2 multiplexors 
24 MB cart, tape, cables, CRT’s 
& AOS/VS with all licenses 
25% off list 
Kenco Data Systems 
800-44-KENCO 718-417-8000 

NPA SYSTEMS INC. 

SALE, LEASE, 

& SERVICES OF 
DG EQUIPMENT 
(516) 467-2500 (NY) 
(415)848-9835 (CA) 
(214)349-1692 (TX) 
DISASTER PLAN & FACILITY 
MANAGEMENT ALSO AVAILABLE 


Sell Your Product 
in the 

BULLETIN 


BOARD 


HEWLETT 

PACKARD 

NCR 

IBM 

IBM 

S/70 & S/68 

Also 

HP 2392A Terminals 

Qty. Available 

Quantity Pricing Available 

All in stock - immediate delivery 
Subject to prior sale 

All warranteed to qualify for 
manufacturer’s maintenance 

BUY * SELL * RENT * LEASE 

Processors * Peripherals * Systems 
From the HP 3000 Experts! 

800/643-4954 213/829-2277 

ConAm Corporation 

It's Performance That Counts! 

buy • NCR • sell 

Harwood International Corp. 

100 Northshore Office Park 
Chattanooga, TN 37343 

Tel. (615)870-5500 Telex #3785891 

We supply more NCR Computer Equip. 

To More NCR Users 

Than Any Other Company, 

Except NCR!! 

S/1 S/34 S/36 
S/38 BUY 4300 

SELL - LEASE - MAINT 

Systems, Peripherals & Upgrades 

Datamarc Computer Sales 

785 Branch Dr, Alpharetta, GA 30201 

Call Collect (404) 475-7507 

FOR SALE 

IBM 3083B 16x16 w/3089 
Available November 1, 1987 

Contact Ken Firman at 

NL Industries, Inc. 

(713) 987-4256 

IBM 

For Sale 

3276-12's 

3287-2's 

8K 0731 's 

Call Debbie 

Midwest Computer 
(312) 954-2228 

S/38 S/36 S/34 

SERIES 1 

BUY - SELL - LEASE 

Systems, Peripherals & Upgrades 

Source Data Products Inc. 

800 Menlo Avenue # 200 

Menlo Par*, CA 94025 
800/328-2669 415/326-7333 

QANTEL 

BUY • SELL • SAVE $ 

IBM DISPLAYWRITERS 

34'S, 36’S, 38'S 

5525 Systems 

5219 Printers, 5253-1 Terminals 

LRK RESOURCES UNLTD INC. 
CALL LAURIE OR RICK 
713-437-7379 

S/36 S/38 

Buy - Sell - Lease 

We Pay Cash 

for your used equipment 

1 -800-LEAS-PAK 

In Texas: 1-800-722-7811 

D/FW Metro: 267-2841 

SALE/LEASE 

4361-5 

Available Now 

Will Modify 

Call Matt Blaustein 
(914) 238-9631 

Computer Merchants Inc. 

BUY SELL LEASE 

QANTEL/NEC 

CALL PROMPT COMPUTER 

Dan Kobie 
(216) 248-2898 

RENT 

Mo. to Mo., Immed. Avail. 

3178 3191 3174 3268 

3179 3278 3274 3287 

3180 3279 3276 4224 

All Other IBM Units Available 

Call Penny 800/426-4381 

In CA 408/241-3677 
Marketex Computer Corp. 

IBM 8100 Equipment For Sale 

8140/C82 Processor used 

3262 Model 2 Printer new 

3287 Model 12 Printer new 

8809 Model B01 Tape Drive new 

8140 Model Upgrade Package 
from a B72 to a C72 new 

Will sell as a package or individual units 
to best offer. Contact Jerry Gilbreath at 
(606) 268-5004. 

WANTED 

S/38-MOD 20 
3430-A1 

3370-1 Is 

Call Ron Gibb 
(914) 238-9631 

Computer Merchants Inc. 


IBM 


LEASE 

4381-M01 
With console 
3375's sale 
3411-3 sale 

Call 

Floyd Conlin 
Datalease 
203-222-0170 


WANG 


H0LS0N ASSOCIATES, INC. 

Buy And Sell 
Guaranteed 
For Wang Maintenance 

2470 Windy Hill Road, Suite 253 
Marietta, GA 30067 
Call: Richard Holley or Carole Benson 
(404) 980-1700 

BUY - SELL 

MVP/LVP • OIS • VS • PC 

SYSTEMS IN INVENTORY 

VS-45 • OIS • VS-100 

GENESIS 

EQUIPMENT MARKETING 
GEM 

(602) 277-8230 


TIME, SERVICES & SOFTWARE 


COMPUTER 

SERVICES 

Fortune 500 company will¬ 
ing to offer time on IBM 
3081 MVS/SP and the use 
of CICS or IDMS/R at very 
economical rates. 

Jim Stein 
(502)426-6455 


9370? MVS? 
SAVE MONEY 

If you want to run MVS on a 
9370, 

our product can SAVE YOU 
$25,000 OR MORE FOR 
EACH INSTALLATION. 

For more information, contact: 

Stuart R. Ehrlich 
E & E Associates 
3 Fletcher Road 
Westford, MA 01886 
(617) 692-5712 


SHIP A DISK 

Are you selling a software pack¬ 
age? For the best results, adver¬ 
tise it in the Time, Services & 
Software section of Computer- 
world’s classified pages. More 
than 600,000 computer-involved 
professionals receive Computer- 
world each week. 

To inquire about our 1987 rates or 
to get a copy of Computerworld 
Rate Card #22, simply call toll- 
free at (800) 343-6474. In Massa¬ 
chusetts call (617) 879-0700. Call 
now. And don't forget to ask 
about earning linage discounts. 

COMPUTERWORLD 

Box 9171 

375 Cochituate Road 
Framingham, MA 01701-9171 

Extension 739 or 740 


COST EFFECTIVE 


COMPUTER SERVICES 


Need to maximize capacity 
without additional capital outlay? 

BethSyslems will pul 20 years ol 
leading edge technology to work lor 
you. We've got the cost effective 
service/solutions you wantI 

• Large scale IBM capability 

MVS/XA IMS DB/DC VM/370 
JES 2 DB 2 CMS 

TSO FOCUS SAS 
CICS DISOSS PROFS 

• Technical and network support 

• 24-hour customer “HELP" desk 

• Resource/facility management 

• Engineering computing services 

• Intergraph CAD/CAM — Graphics 

• Consulting Services 

Call (215) 694-7500 

liethSystems i 

Bethlehem Steel Corporation 
1642 Marlin Tower • Bethlehem, PA 18016 


CONVERSION ENGINE® 

THE CONVERSION PROCESSOR THAT AUTOMAT 
ICALLY CONVERTS 95 TO 98% OF APPLICATION 
CODE TO A NEW LANGUAGE STRUCTURE. OR 
ENVIRONMENT, 

• Migrate to new hardware/operating system 

• Change data base managers 

• Go to new on line monitor 

• Re-structure the code 

A unique system, the Conversion Engine® can 
Re Engineer current applications—Lifting out 
logic, data flows, procedures, screen and print 
formats, etc —Generating the desired replace¬ 
ment code. 

Call or write 

FRIEDMAN 

ssociates.Inc. 

9241 LBJ Frwy #100. Dallas, TX (214) 644 1379 



How to increase 
your power 

without paying 
the price. 


Turn to Manufacturers Hanover 
Data Services Corporation 
for low-cost, state-of-the-art 
timesharing and Information 
Center services. 

• Secure environment 

• Software includes MVS SP, 

VM SP, VM XA. TSO, GDDM, 
CMS, and Presentation 
Graphics Equipment 

• Processing done on IBM 3084 
MX3 and IBM 4381 systems 

• Accessible via many tele¬ 
communications methods 

• Volume discounts 

For more information write: 

Jeff Daum 

Manufacturers Hanover Data 
Services Corporation 
P.O. Box 26 

Carlstadt, New Jersey 07072 
Or call (201 >896-2030 


555 Manufacturers 
HANOVER 

IBM is a trademark ol International 
Business Machines Corporation 

<£; 1987 Manufacturers Hanover Trust 



Innovative Computar Techmquoa 

COMPUTER SERVICES 
IBM 3081 DEC-10 
VAX 8600 


• Batch Processing 

• Timesharing 


• Public Network Access 

• Laser Printing 


Route BOB. Raritan. N.J. OBB69 
801-8BB-3400. Contact: Joyca Bogeenko 


R&R 

Repair and Refurbishment 

Mainframes ■ Minis ■ Micros ■ Peripherals 

■ Over 3,000 makes & models ■ Class 100 clean room 

■ Board repairs to system ■ No order too large or small 

overhauls ■ Fast, professional, affordable 

■ Fixed & floppy drive repairs service 


1 - 800 - 523-0254 

In Pennsylvania (215) 265*6601 

Sorbus 


A Bell Atlantic Company 

50 East Swedesford Road 
Frazer, PA 19355 


COMPUTING SERVICES 


CPU 1 

MVS/XA 

CICS 

IMS 

TSO 


CPU 2 

VM/370 

DOS/VSE 

CICS 

CMS 


•* IBM HARDWARE 
” FULL TECHNICAL SUPPORT 
•• FOURTH GENERATION LANGUAGES 
” NATIONWIDE ACCESS 
•• GUARANTEED RESPONSE ANO 
AVAILABILITY 

** FULL DISASTER RECOVERY BACKUP 
- ON-SITE CUSTOMER AREA 
" FULL SECURITY 
*• VOLUME AND TERM DISCOUNTS 
For more information please contact 

Burns 


computing 
SERVICES. INC 


10 Gould Center 
Rolling Meadows, IL 60008 
Midwestern Sales (312) 981-5260 

Eastern Sales (212) 432-1151 • (215) 398-3600 


DEC SPECIALISTS 

VAX 8600 & PDP-11 
TIMESHARING 

NO CPU CHARGES 

% wm f! $t 


7/‘10 

STS/E VMS 


RSTS/E 

PER HOUR 
CONNECT TIME 


ni 

Ml 

m 
i ii 
i 
i 


BUDGE1 

BYTES 

212 - 

, 944 - 9230 , 


EXT 110 


TIMESHARING 
GENERAL CONSULTING 
SOFTWARE DEVELOPMENT - ' 

FACILITIES MANAGEMENT 
COMPUTER EQUIPMENT & SUPPLIES 
HARDWARE MAINTENANCE (NY METRO AREA) 
MEDIA CONVERSION 
EXECUTIVE SEARCH 
I I SOLOMON ACCOUNTING SOFTWARE 

Omnicomputer, Inc." 

1440 Broadway, New York, N.Y. 10018 


AUGUST 10, 1987 


COMPUTERWORLD 


89 






































































































‘As soon as our ads 
started running in Computerworld 
the phones started ringi n g? 

— Art Ingram 
Vice President, Marketing and Sales 
Tangram Systems Corporation 



Art Ingram is Vice President for 
Marketing and Sales tor Tangram 
Systems Corporation ot Cary, North 
Carolina, a micro-to-mainlrame 
software vendor. Tangram is cur¬ 
rently riding high on its Arbiter, a 
cooperative processing technol¬ 
ogy that allows the integration of 
PCs and mainframes, regardless of 
network configuration. 

The start-up company, whose soft¬ 
ware is in place at government, 
financial and manufacturing sites, 
wanted to promote Arbiter — and 
itself. And Art had determined that 
the best place to do both is in the 
pages of Computerworld. 


"We needed to get the message to 
MIS managers and users that we 
can help them integrate thousands 
ot PCs into the mainframe environ¬ 
ment with Arbiter. Plus, as a new 
company, we were out to gener¬ 
ate name recognition. 

"It was clear from the start that 
Computerworld would deliver the 
audience we're looking tor be¬ 
cause it addresses a broad cross- 
section of readers. All our cam¬ 
paigns are built around 
Computerworld and maybe one 
specialized publication. Take Com¬ 
puterworld out of the picture and 
there is no Number One choice. 

"As soon as our ads started run¬ 
ning in Computerworld, the 
phones started ringing. The inqui¬ 


ries we're getting are timely and 
responsive. And we're very im¬ 
pressed with the high level of deci¬ 
sion makers who are calling. 

"Tangram is committed to Compu¬ 
terworld for the future. It's our pri¬ 
mary vehicle, and we have every 
intention of staying on this success¬ 
ful track ." 

Computerworld. We're helping 
more suppliers reach more buyers 
more often in the computer mar¬ 
ket. Every week. We're working for 
Tangram Systems Corporation. We 
can work for you. 

For all the facts, call Ed Marecki, 
Vice President/Sales, Computer- 
world, at (617) 879-0700 today. 


Sales Offices 

BOSTON/(617) 879-0700. NEW YORK/(201) 
967-1350. WASHINGTON D.C./(703) 280- 
2027 ATLANTA/(404) 394-0758. 

CHICAGO/(312) 827-4433. DALLAS/(214) 
233-0882. LOS ANGELES/(714) 261-1230. 
SAN FRANCISCO/(415) 421-7330. 


An IDG Communications Publication 













































ADVERTISERS INDEX 


COMPUTERWORID 


SALES OFFICES 

Publisher/James S. Rovec 

Vice President/Sales/Edward P. Marecki, COMPUTERWORLD, 375 Cochituate Road, Box 9171, Framing¬ 
ham, MA 01701-9171, (617) 879-0700 

BOSTON SALES OFFICE Northern Regional Manager/Michael F. Kelleher, District Managers/David Peter¬ 
son, Bill Cadigan, Sherry Dnscoll, Account Manager/John Watts, Sales Assistant/Alice Longley, COMPU¬ 
TERWORLD, 375 Cochituate Road, Box 9171, Framingham, MA 01701-9171 (617) 879-0700 

CHICAGO SALES OFFICE Midwest Regional Manager/Russ Gerches, District Managers/Kevin McPherson, 
Larry Craven, Account Manager/Robert A. Raudys, Sales Assistant/Kathy Sullivant, COMPUTERWORLD, 
2600 South River Road, Suite 304, Des Plaines, IL 60018 (312) 827-4433 

NEW YORK SALES OFFICE Eastern Regional Director/Michael J. Masters, Senior District Manager/Doug 
Cheney, District Managers/Fred Lo Sapio, Frank Genovese, Account Managers/Paula Smith, Helene 
Tepperman, Sales Assistants/Mary Tagliareni, Sue Larson, Eileen Lobaugh, COMPUTERWORLD, Paramus 
Plaza I, 140 Route 17 North, Paramus, NJ 07652 (201) 967-1350 

LOS ANGELES SALES OFFICE Western Regional Director/William J. Healey, District Managers/Carolyn 
Knox, Gary Hooks COMPUTERWORLD, 18004 Sky Park Circle, Suite 255, Irvine, CA 92714 (714) 261- 
1230 

SAN FRANCISCO SALES OFFICE Western Regional Director/William J. Healey, Senior District Manager/ 
Barry Milione, District Managers/Emie Chamberlain, Mark V. Glasner, Stevan Phillips, Account Manager/ 
Alicia Hodge, COMPUTERWORLD, 300 Broadway, Suite 20, San Francisco, CA 94133 (415) 421-7330 

ATLANTA SALES OFFICE Eastern Regional Director/Michael J. Masters, District Manager/Jeffrey Mel- 
nick, Sales Assistant/Melissa Christie, COMPUTERWORLD, 1400 Lake Hearn Drive, Suite 330, Atlanta, 
GA 30319 (404) 394-0758 

DALLAS SALES OFFICE Midwest Regional Manager/Russ Gerches, District Manager/Kevin C. Harold, 
COMPUTERWORLD, 14651 Dallas Parkway, Suite 304, Dallas, TX 75240 (214) 233-0882 

WASHINGTON D.C. SALES OFFICE Eastern Regional Director/Michael J. Masters, District Manager/Ber- 
nie Hockswender, COMPUTERWORLD, 3022 Javier Road, Suite 210, Fairfax, VA 22031 (703) 280-2027 

PRODUCT CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING Product Classified Advertising/Account Manager Peter Slingluff, 
375 Cochituate Road, Box 9171, Framingham, MA 01701-9171 (617) 879-0700 

RECRUITMENT ADVERTISING National Recruitment Sales Director/John Corrigan, 375 Cochituate Road, 
Box 9171, Framingham, MA 01701-9171 (617) 879-0700 

RECRUITMENT ADVERTISING SALES OFFICES 
New England Recruitment Manager/AI DeMille 
375 Cochituate Road, Box 9171, Framingham, MA 01701-9171 (617) 879-0700 

Mid-Atlantic Recruitment Manager/Warren Kolber 
Paramus Plaza 1, 140 Route 17 North. Paramus, NJ 07652 (201) 967-1350 

Midwest Recruitment Manager/Patricia Fbwers 
2600 South River Road, Suite 304, Des Plaines, IL 60018 (312) 827-4433 

Western Recruitment Manager/Barbara Murphy 
18004 Skypark Cicrie, Suite 100, Irvine, CA 92714 (714) 250-0164 

South-Atlantic Recruitment Manager/Kathryn Kress 
3110 Fairview Park Drive, Suite 1040, Falls Church, VA 22042 (703) 876-5100 

RECRUITMENT TELEMARKETING ACCOUNT EXECUTIVES 
New England, New York/Jay Novack, Mid-Atlantlc/Pauline Smith 
Midwest/Ellen Casey, Western/Nancy Ftercival 
Toll Free: 1-800-343-6474 or (617) 879-0700 


FOREIGN EDITORIAL/SALES OFFICES 


Argentina: Ruben Argento, CW Communications S/A, Av Bel 
grano 406-Piso 9, CP 1092 Buenos Aires. Phone: (Oil) 54 
134-5583. Telex: (390) 22644 (BAZAN AR). 

Asia: Euan Barty, Asia Computerworid Communications Ltd., 
701-4 Kam Chung Bldg., 54 Jaffe Road, Wanchai, Hong 
Kong, Phone: (Oil) 852 5 861 3238. Telex: (780) 72827 
(COMWOR HX). 

Australia: Alan Fbwer, Computerworid Pty. Ltd., 37-43 Alex 
ander Street, Crows Nest, NSW 2065. Phone: (Oil) 61 2 
4395133. Telex: (790) AA74752 (COMWOR). 

Austria: Manfred Weiss, CW Publikationen Velagsgesellschaft 
m.b.H., Josefstadter Strasse 74, A-1080 Wien, Austria. 
Phone: (011) 43 222486 5910. Telex: (847) 115 542 (SCH/ 
A). 

Brazil: Ney Kruel, Computerworid do Brazil, Rua Aicindo Gua- 
nabara, 25-11 andar, 20.031 Rio de Janeiro, RJ Brazil. 
Phone: (011) 55 21 240 8225. Telex: (391) 21 30838. 

Denmark: Preben Engell, Computerworid Danmark A/S. Tor 
vegade 52, 1400 Copenhagen K, Denmark. Phone: (011) 45 
1955 695. Telex: (855) 31566 

France: Jean-Louis Rendon, Computerworid Communications 
S.A., 185 Avenue Charles De Gaulle, 92200 Neuilly Sur 
Seine. France. Phone: (011) 33 14 747 1272. Telex. (842) 
613234 F. 

Hungary: Dezso Futasz. Computerworid Informatika Co.. Ltd. 
H-1536 Budapest. Pf. 386, Hungary. Phone: (011) 36 1 228 
458. Telex: (861) 22 6307 (KSHP H). 

Italy: Dr. Bruno Fazzmi, Computer Publishing Group S.R.L., Via 
Vida 7, 20127 Milano, Italy. Phone: (011) 39 02 2613432. 
Telex: (843) 335318 

Japan: Mr. Shuji Mizuguchi. Computerworid Japan, 7-4 Shin- 
tomi 1-Chome, Chuo-ku. Tokyo 104. Phone: (011) 81 3 551 
3882. Telex: (781) 252-4217 (Computerworid Japan only). 

M. Nakamura, IDG Communications. Japan, c/o Marcom In¬ 
ternational, Inc., Akasaka Center Building, 1-3-12 Moto-aka- 
saka, Mmato-ku, Tokyo 107, Japan. Phone: (011) 81 3 403- 
8515. Telex: (781) J27941 (reps for all CW Publishing 
publications except Computerworid Japan). 

Mexico: Henry Morales. Computer Mexico S.A. de C.V., Oaxa¬ 
ca 21-2, Mexico City 7 D.F. Colonia Roma, 06700 Mexico. 
Phone: (905) 514-4218 or 6309. Telex: (383) 177 1300 
(ACHAME). 


The Netherlands: Wout Berends. CW Communications B V.. 
van Eeghenstraat 84. 1071 GK Amsterdam, The Nether 
lands. Phone: (Oil) 31 20 646426. Telex: (844) 18242 
(CWCOM NL). 

New Zealand: Reg Birchlield, CW Communications Ltd., 13 
Maidstone St.. Grey Inn, Auckland 1. New Zealand. Phone: 
(011) 64 9 768 993. Fax: (011) 64 9 780 244 

Norway: Morten Hansen. CW Norge A/S, Hovmveien 43. P.O. 
Box 2862, Toyen, 0608 Oslo 6, Norway. Phone: (Oil) 472 
647725. Telex: (856) 76476 (CW NOR N). 

People's Republic of China: Chen Mingkun, China Computer 
world, 74 Lu Gu Road, Box 750, Beijing 100039, People's 
Republic of China. Phone: (011) 47 814 6174. Telex: (716) 
222214 (CCW CN). 

Spain: Francisco Zabala, Computerworid Espana, Rafael 
Calvo 18 48, 28010 Madrid. Spain. Phone: (011) 34 1 419 
4014. Telex: (831) 47894 (CW E). 

Sweden: Bengt Mamfeldt, CW Communications AB, Sodra 
Hamnvagen 22. S-l 15 41 Stockholm, Sweden Phone: (011) 
46 8 67 91 80 Telex: (854) 14904 9 (NOVACW). 

Switzerland: Gebhard Osterwalder, CW Publikationen AG, Wi- 
tikonerstrasse no. 15, Fbstfach 253, CH 8030 Zurich, Swit¬ 
zerland. Phone: (011) 41 1 55 10 77. Telex: (845) 816 710. 

Taiwan: Leona Wang, ACE Media Agency Co. Ltd., P.O. Box 
26-578 Taipei. Taiwan. R.O.C. Phone: (Oil) 02 751 3636. 
Telex: (785) 14142 (ACE GROUP). (Representative for all 
CWCI publications). 

London: Martin Durham, CW Communications Ltd., 99 
Grays Inn Rd., London, WCI 8UT, United Kingdom. Phone: 
(011) 44 1 831 9252. Telex: (851) 262346. 

United Kingdom. Euan Rose, Beere Hobson & Associates, 
34 Warwick Road. Kenilworth. Warwickshire, CV8 1HE, 
United Kingdom. Phone: (011) 09 26 512424 Telex: (851) 
311951 (BEEHOB). (Representative for all CWCI publica¬ 
tions). 

Venezuela: Kalman von Vajna Nagy, CW Comunicaciones, 
C.R.L. Torre Maracaibo, Piso 13, Oficina H, Av. Libertador, 
Caracas, Venezuela. Phone: (011) 58 2 72 76 30. 

West Germany: Eckhard Utpadel, CW Publikationen Ver- 
lagsgesellschaft mbH, Rhemstrasse 26/28. Fbstfach 40 
0429. 8000 Munchen 40, West Germany. Phone: (011) 49 
89 360860. Telex: (841) 5215350. (COMW D). 


IDG COMMUNICATIONS/INC. 

Patrick J. McGovern 
Board Chairman 


Axel Leblois James S. Povec 

Chief Executive Officer President 

IDG Communlcatlons/lnc. _ CW Publlshlng/lnc. __ 

Vice President/Sales. Edward P. Marecki. Vice President/Finance. William P. Murphy. 

Computerworid Headquarters: 375 Cochituate Road, P.O. Box 9171, Framingham, MA 01701-9171 
Phone: (617) 879-0700, Telex: 95-1153. FAX: (617) 875-8931 
SALES Vice President/Display Sales, Edward P. Marecki. National Recruitment Sales 

Director, John Comgan. Display Sales Operations Manager, Carolyn Novack. Display 
Advertising Production Manager. Maureen Carter. Classified Operations Manager, 
Cynthia Delany. 

MARKETING Director of Marketing. Bob Singer Marketing Services Manager, Audrey Shohan 
COMMUNICATION SERVICES Vice President/Research. Jack Edmonston. Director Research, Kathryn Dmneen. 
Sales Promotion Director, Liz Johnson. 

PRODUCTION Production Director, Peter Holm Senior Production Manager. Leigh Swearingen. 

Typesetting Manager. Carol Fblack. Art Director, Tom Monahan. 

CIRCULATION Circulation Director, Nancy L. Merritt. 


ADR.3,S8 

Amdahl DASD.58 

Aspen Research.35 

AT&T.26.S2-3 

Barrington Systems.32 

BMC Software.13 

Business Land.10 

Business Recovery System, Inc.34 

Cambex Corporation.63 

Candle Corporation.36-37 

C/D ROM Conference.66-67 

Cincom.S4-5 

Cobol Shop, The.37 

Codex.40 

Command Technology Corporation ...60 

Compaq.53-55 

Computer Associates.31 

Computer Consultants Systems.44 

Cullinet.S10-11 

CW Circulation.SC4 

CW Focus.76 

CW Spotlight.75 

CW Searchlink.74 

CW Testimonial.90 

CWIMS.73 

Data Switch.S14 

D/B Access.57 

DataMedia Corporation.56 

Datasouth.44 

Dataware.62 

Decision Data.50 

Deltak Training.52 

Digital Equipment Corporation .... 20-21 
Diversified Programming Services 

Inc.42 

DSIMS.S9 

Duquesne Systems.42 

Econocom.29 

Electronic Forms.SI2-13 

EMC Corporation.16 

Fujitsu.17 

Goldman Sachs.64 


Gould Computer Systems.46-47 

Hayes Microcomputing.30 

Hewlett Packard.19,65 

H&M Systems.95 

Honeywell Bull.48-49 

Independent Research.27 

Information Dimensions.SI6-17 

Informix.25.34.S6 

Innovation Data Processing.7 

JDS Microprocessing.60 

Kolinar.36 

Landmark Systems.S15 

McCormack & Dodge.96 

Michaels, Ross and Cole.47 

Micom.72 

Micro Focus.33 

Microsoft.24 

Mid-American Control Corporation ....46 

NEC Information Systems.61 

Nixdorf Computer.70 

On-Line Software.28 

Oracle.9 

Pick Systems.69 

Qume Corporation.35 

Realia, Inc.18 

Relational Technology Inc.SC2 

SAS Institute.14-15,41 

Softool Corporation.62 

Software AG.12 

Sorbus.SC3 

Symbolics.38-39 

Syncsort.5 

Teknowledge.11 

VM Software.S9 

Walker Interactive.43 


This index is provided as an additional service. 
The Publisher does not assume any 
liability for errors or omissions. 



Upcoming Computerworid 
Spotlight Sections 


Issue Date Topic Ad Closing Date 


Aug. 31 

DBMS for Micros & Small 

Systems 

Aug. 14 

Sept. 14 

DB2 Market 

Aug. 28 

Sept. 21 

Hardware Roundup: 

Large & Medium Scale Systems 

Sept. 4 

Sept. 28 

Hardware Roundup: 

Small Scale Systems 

Sept. 11 

Oct. 5 

Hardware Roundup: 

Micros 

Sept. 18 


AUGUST 10, 1987 


COMPUTERWORLD 


























































































































TRADING INDEX 


NEWS 


Computerworld Stock Trading Summary 


CLOSING PRICES WEDNESDAY, AUG. 5,1987 



Indexes 

Last Week 

This Week 

Communications 

101.8 

103.4 

Computer Systems 

123.6 

123.5 

Software & DP Services 

131.6 

134.4 

Semiconductors 

117.1 

120.3 

Peripherals & Subsystems 

113.0 

114.1 

Leasing Companies 

116.7 

120.9 

Composite Index 

103.1 

103.5 

S&P 500 Index 

129.4 

130.5 


Communications 



100 - 

2/11 8/5 


Semiconductors 

150- 



E .-PRICE-. 

X 52-WEEK CLOSE WEEK WEEK 

C RANGE AUG. 5 NET PCT 

H (1) 1987 CHNGE CHNGE 


Communications and Network Services 


N 

AMERICAN INFO TECHS CORP 

101 

77 

88.75 

+ 0.9 

+ 1.0 

Q 

ANDREW CORP 

19 

14 

16.25 

-0.8 

-4.4 

Q 

ARTEL COMM CORP 

5 

2 

2.88 

+0.0 

+ 0.0 

N 

AT&T 

33 

22 

32.88 

+0.5 

+ 1.5 

Q 

AVANT GARDE COMP INC 

7 

3 

3.63 

+ 0.6 

+ 18.3 

0 

AVANTEKINC 

19 

13 

14.88 

+ 0.3 

+ 1.7 

N 

AYDINCORP 

38 

18 

30.63 

-2.0 

-6.1 

N 

BELL ATLANTIC CORP 

77 

62 

69.00 

+ 1.5 

+ 2.2 

N 

BELLSOUTH CORP 

46 

35 

39.25 

+0.3 

+0.6 

Q 

BRIDGE COMMUNICATION 

27 

11 

22.00 

+ 1.6 

+ 8.0 

Q 

COMPRESSION LABS INC 

13 

4 

4.38 

-0.3 

-6.7 

0 

COMPUTER NETWORK TECH 

8 

4 

4.06 

+ 0.0 

+ 0.0 

0 

CONTELCORP 

37 

27 

36.50 

+ 3.3 

+ 9.8 

Q 

DATA SWITCH CORP 

9 

5 

6.38 

+0.0 

+ 0.0 

Q 

DIGITAL COMM ASSOC 

49 

17 

36.50 

+ 2.0 

+ 5.8 

Q 

DYNATECH CORP 

44 

27 

28.50 

+ 0.4 

+ 1.3 

Q 

EQUATORIAL COMM CO 

6 

2 

3.00 

-0.3 

-7.7 

Q 

GANDALF TECHNOLOGIES 

11 

5 

7.25 

+ 0.3 

+ 3.6 

Q 

GENERAL DATACOMMINDS 

14 

8 

8.63 

-0.3 

-2.8 

N 

GTE CORP 

43 

34 

41.63 

+ 2.3 

+ 5.7 

Q 

INFOTRON SYS CORP 

13 

7 

9.00 

+ 0.0 

+ 0.0 

N 

ITT CORP 

66 

47 

63.75 

+ 1.1 

+ 1.8 

N 

M A COM INC 

16 

12 

15.88 

+0.3 

+ 1.6 

Q 

MCI COMMUNICATIONS CORP 

9 

5 

7.88 

+ 0.0 

+ 0.0 

Q 

MICOMSYS INC 

18 

10 

11.75 

+0.6 

+ 5.6 

Q 

NETWORK SYS CORP 

19 

9 

10.25 

-0.1 

-1.2 

N 

NORTHERN TELECOM LTD 

24 

14 

21.50 

-0.5 

2.3 

Q 

NOVELL INC 

27 

9 

19.00 

+ 0.5 

+ 2.7 

N 

NYNEX CORP 

73 

59 

70.50 

+ 2.3 

+ 3.3 

N 

PACIFIC TELESIS GROUP 

31 

23 

27.13 

+ 0.8 

+ 2.8 

N 

PARADYNE CORP 

8 

4 

6.63 

-0.3 

-3.6 

A 

PENRIL CORP 

6 

4 

4.88 

+0.4 

+8.3 

N 

PLESSEY PLC 

41 

24 

32.13 

-1.9 

-5.5 

N 

SCIENTIFIC ATLANTA INC 

20 

9 

17.88 

+ 1.1 

+ 6.7 

N 

SOUTHWESTERN BELL CORP 

41 

33 

39.00 

+ 1.9 

+ 5.1 

Q 

3COM CORP 

24 

9 

15.75 

+ 1.0 

+ 6.8 

N 

TIMEPLEX INC 

41 

15 

33.13 

+0.1 

+ 0.4 

Q 

UNGERMANN BASS INC 

16 

7 

10.50 

-0.6 

-5.6 

N 

US WEST INC 

62 

45 

52.63 

+0.9 

+ 1.7 


Computer Systems 


Q 

ALLIANT COMPUTER SYS 

37 

16 

18.75 

-1.5 

-7.4 

Q 

ALPHA MICROSYSTEMS 

7 

3 

5.13 

+ 0.1 

+ 2.5 

Q 

ALTOS COMPUTER SYS 

17 

10 

12.50 

+0.3 

+ 2.0 

A 

AMDAHL CORP 

42 

17 

36.75 

+ 0.3 

+ 0.7 

Q 

APOLLO COMPUTER INC 

25 

9 

19.25 

+ 1.0 

+ 5.5 

Q 

APPLE COMPUTER INC 

45 

16 

43.25 

+2.3 

+ 5.5 

N 

BOLT BERANEK & NEWMAN 

30 

19 

20.00 

+ 0.0 

+0.0 

Q 

BRITTON LEE INC 

5 

3 

3.25 

+ 0.8 

+ 30.0 

N 

COMPAQ COMPUTER CORP 

51 

13 

47.00 

+ 0.0 

+ 0.0 

Q 

COMPUTER AUTOMATION INC 

17 

2 

11.75 

+ 0.0 

+ 0.0 

A 

COMPUTER CONSOLES INC 

12 

7 

8.13 

-0.6 

-7.1 

Q 

CONCURRENT COMP CORP 

20 

11 

19.50 

-0.5 

2.5 

N 

CONTROL DATA CORP DEL 

35 

20 

33.25 

+ 5.6 

+20.4 

Q 

CONVERGENTTECH 

12 

4 

7.25 

+ 0.0 

+ 0.0 

Q 

CONVEX COMPUTER CORP 

22 

8 

15.88 

+ 1.9 

+ 13.4 

N 

CRAY RESH INC 

136 

69 

104.88 

+ 3.0 

+ 2.9 

Q 

DAISY SYS CORP 

13 

7 

7.75 

+0.8 

+ 10.7 

N 

DATA GEN CORP 

39 

25 

32.25 

+ 0.3 

+ 0.8 

N 

DATAPOINT CORP 

9 

4 

6.88 

+ 0.8 

+ 12.2 

N 

DIGITAL EQUIP CORP 

175 

88 

165.25 

+ 4.8 

+ 3.0 

N 

FLOATING POINT SYS INC 

17 

8 

10.00 

-1.5 

-13.0 

N 

GOULD INC 

23 

16 

21.75 

-1.4 

-5.9 

N 

HARRIS CORP DEL 

43 

27 

36.13 

+ 1.6 

+ 4.7 

N 

HEWLETT PACKARD CO 

67 

37 

62.25 

+0.3 

+0.4 

N 

HONEYWELL INC 

88 

58 

84.75 

+ 2.0 

+ 2.4 

N 

IBM 

170 

116 

160.25 

-1.3 

-0.8 

Q 

INFORMATION INTLINC 

17 

13 

14.00 

-0.3 

-1.8 

Q 

IPLSYSINC 

3 

2 

2.88 

-0.3 

-8.0 

Q 

MASS COMPUTER CORP 

10 

5 

8.75 

+0.3 

+ 2.9 

N 

MATSUSHITA ELEC INDL LTD 

173 

81 

166.50 

-1.8 

-1.0 

Q 

MEGA DATA CORP 

7 

2 

5.00 

+0.0 

+0.0 

Q 

MENTOR GRAPHICS CORP 

34 

11 

28.25 

-0.4 

-1.3 

N 

NBI INC 

14 

8 

12.13 

-1.0 

-7.6 

N 

NCR CORP 

80 

42 

76.50 

-1.8 

-2.2 

N 

PRIME COMPUTER INC 

30 

16 

26.13 

+0.0 

+ 0.0 

Q 

PYRAMID TECHNOLOGY 

12 

4 

7.75 

-0.3 

-3.1 

Q 

STRATUS COMPUTER 

41 

18 

27.50 

+0.5 

+ 1.9 

Q 

SUN MICROSYSTEM INC 

46 

11 

34.13 

-1.1 

3.2 

Q 

SYMBOLICS INC 

8 

4 

4.50 

+0.1 

+ 2.9 

N 

TANDEM COMPUTERS INC 

38 

16 

27.88 

-1.0 

-3.5 

N 

TANDYCORP 

56 

31 

46.25 

+ 0.9 

+ 1.9 

N 

ULTIMATE CORP 

30 

13 

28.88 

+ 1.0 

+ 3.6 

N 

UNISYS CORP 

45 

22 

44.38 

-85.0 

-65.7 

A 

WANG LABS INC 

19 

11 

16.50 

-0.3 

-1.5 


Software & DP Services 


Q 

ADVANCED COMP TECH 

6 

3 

3.88 

+0.3 

+ 6.9 

N 

ADVANCED SYS INC 

25 

12 

23.88 

+ 0.9 

+ 3.8 

N 

AGS COMPUTERS INC 

22 

8 

19.88 

+ 1.0 

+ 5.3 

Q 

AMERICAN MGMT SYS INC 

19 

7 

16.63 

-0.5 

-2.9 

Q 

AMERICAN SOFTWARE INC 

22 

7 

15.50 

-0.3 

-1.6 

N 

ANACOMP INC 

11 

3 

10.50 

+ 0.6 

+ 6.3 

Q 

ANALYSTS INTL CORP 

9 

3 

8.00 

+ 0.8 

+ 10.3 

Q 

ASHTONTATE 

30 

11 

23.13 

+0.1 

+ 0.5 

Q 

ASK COMPUTER SYS INC 

17 

10 

13.88 

+ 0.5 

+ 3.7 

Q 

AUTODESK INC 

285 

9 

25.00 

+ 3.0 

+ 13.6 

N 

AUTO DATA PROCESSING 

51 

29 

47.13 

-0.4 

-0.8 

Q 

BOOLE & BABBAGE INC 

12 

4 

11.00 

+ 0.0 

+0.0 

N 

COMPUTER ASSOC INTL INC 

29 

10 

26.25 

+2.1 

+ 8.8 

Q 

COMPUTER HORIZONS CORP 

15 

10 

12.63 

-0.6 

-4.7 

N 

COMPUTER SCIENCES CORP 

61 

30 

54.00 

-1.8 

-3.1 

N 

COMPUTER TASK GROUP INC 

18 

11 

12.25 

+ 0.0 

+0.0 

Q 

COMSHARE INC 

28 

11 

24.25 

+ 0.3 

+ 1.0 

N 

CULLINET SOFTWARE INC 

13 

6 

11.88 

-0.4 

-3.1 

Q 

CYCARE SYS INC 

12 

7 

9.25 

+0.6 

+ 7.2 

Q 

DUQUESNESYS INC 

33 

12 

20.25 

+ 1.3 

+ 6.6 

Q 

ENDATA INC 

12 

5 

9.88 

+0.3 

+ 2.6 

N 

GENERAL MTRS(CLSE) 

45 

24 

43.00 

+0.6 

+ 1.5 

Q 

HOGAN SYS INC 

17 

9 

13.38 

-0.3 

-1.8 

Q 

INFORMIX CORP 

23 

7 

18.50 

-0.5 

-2.6 

Q 

INTELLICORP INC 

11 

4 

7.00 

+ 0.0 

+0.0 

Q 

KEANE INC 

10 

5 

7.25 

-0.8 

-9.4 

Q 

LOTUS DEV CORP 

37 

9 

30.00 

-0.5 

-1.6 

Q 

MANAGEMENT SCI AMER 

21 

11 

12.00 

+ 0.0 

+ 0.0 

Q 

MICRO PRO INTL CORP 

8 

2 

5.44 

-0.1 

-1.1 

Q 

MICROSOFT CORP 

128 

26 

97.25 

-2.0 

-2.0 

0 

NATIONAL DATA CORP 

32 

17 

31.75 

+ 4.9 

+ 18.1 

Q 

ON LINE SOFTWARE INTL INC 

20 

6 

18.88 

+ 1.5 

+ 8.6 

Q 

ORACLE SYS CORP 

30 

7 

23.50 

+ 2.8 

+ 13.3 

N 

PANSOPHIC SYS INC 

23 

12 

18.13 

+ 0.1 

+ 0.7 

<3 

POLICY MGMT SYS CORP 

30 

15 

23.50 

+ 0.0 

+ 0.0 

Q 

PROGRAMMING & SYS INC 

13 

8 

11.25 

+0.3 

+ 2.3 

Q 

REYNOLDS & REYNOLDS CO 

42 

27 

34.75 

+ 1.8 

+ 5.3 

Q 

SEICORP 

18 

8 

15.75 

+ 0.0 

+ 0.0 

Q 

SHARED MED SYS CORP 

53 

23 

25.75 

+ 0.4 

+ 1.5 

Q 

SOFTWARE AG SYSTEMS INC 

20 

10 

13.00 

+0.5 

+4.0 

Q 

SOFTWARE PUBG CORP 

17 

5 

8.75 

-0.5 

-5.4 

A 

STERLING SOFTWARE INC 

19 

9 

10.25 

+0.4 

+ 3.8 

Q 

SUNGARD DATA SYS INC 

21 

10 

17.00 

-1.0 

-5.6 

Q 

SYSTEMATICSINC 

30 

14 

26.75 

+0.5 

+ 1.9 

N 

UCCELCORP 

45 

19 

43.88 

+ 3.1 

+ 7.7 

N 

URSCORP 

21 

13 

17.88 

-0.6 

-3.4 

Q 

VM SOFTWARE INC 

45 

15 

18.25 

+ 0.8 

+ 4.3 


Semiconductors 


N 

ADV MICRO DEVICES INC 

25 

13 

18.13 

+ 0.3 

+ 1.4 

N 

ANALOG DEVICES INC 

24 

14 

21.88 

+ 0.4 

+ 1.7 

Q 

ANALOGIC CORP 

13 

10 

12.25 

+ 0.3 

+ 2.1 

Q 

INTEL CORP 

51 

16 

46.88 

-0.4 

-0.8 

Q 

LSI LOGIC CORP 

17 

8 

10.75 

+0.1 

+ 1.2 

Q 

MONOLITHIC MEMORIES INC 

19 

10 

15.63 

+ 0.4 

+ 2.5 

N 

MOTOROLA INC 

64 

34 

58.63 

+ 1.9 

+ 3.3 

N 

NATL SEMICONDUCTOR 

17 

8 

13.63 

+ 0.8 

+ 5.8 

N 

TEXAS INSTRS INC 

68 

34 

62.88 

+ 3.1 

+ 5.2 

A 

WESTERN DIGITAL CORP 

33 

12 

27.75 

+ 1.3 

+4.7 


Peripherals 


N 

AM INTL INC 

9 

5 

7.88 

+0.3 

+ 3.3 

Q 

AST RESH INC 

23 

11 

17.00 

+ 2.0 

+ 13.3 

Q 

AUTO TROL TECH CORP 

9 

3 

6.50 

+0.0 

+ 0.0 

0 

BANCTECINC 

16 

6 

12.63 

+ 0.1 

+ 1.0 

Q 

CIPHER DATA PRODS INC 

18 

9 

9.63 

-0.4 

-3.8 

A 

COGNITRONICS CORP 

5 

2 

3.88 

+0.0 

+ 0.0 

N 

COMPUGRAPHIC CORP 

24 

16 

23.25 

-0.3 

-1.1 

N 

COMPUTERVISION CORP 

23 

11 

14.50 

-0.5 

-3.3 

N 

CONRAC CORP 

30 

12 

0.00 

+0.0 

+ 0.0 

A 

DATAPRODUCTS CORP 

16 

10 

11.38 

+ 0.3 

+ 2.2 

A 

DATARAMCORP 

10 

7 

7.13 

-0.1 

-1.7 

N 

DECISION INDS CORP 

13 

7 

11.25 

-0.8 

-6.3 

N 

EASTMAN KODAK CO 

96 

52 

95.25 

+ 1.4 

+ 1.5 

Q 

EMCCORP MASS 

35 

11 

34.75 

+6.0 

+ 20.9 

Q 

EMULEXCORP 

10 

6 

7.50 

-0.1 

-1.6 

Q 

EVANS & SUTHERLAND 

40 

20 

30.75 

+0.8 

+ 2.5 

Q 

ICOTCORP 

13 

5 

5.88 

-0.5 

-7.8 

Q 

INTERLEAF INC 

20 

8 

15.63 

-0.3 

-1.6 

Q 

IOMEGA CORP 

12 

2 

3.38 

+ 0.3 

+ 8.0 

Q 

LEE DATA CORP 

10 

5 

5.25 

+0.1 

+ 2.4 

Q 

MASSTOR SYS CORP 

6 

2 

4.63 

-0.8 

15.0 

Q 

MAXTOR CORP 

34 

12 

13.75 

-0.4 

-2.7 

Q 

MICROPOLIS CORP 

44 

14 

35.63 

+3.6 

+ 11.3 

Q 

MINISCRIBE CORP 

18 

5 

14.00 

+ 1.3 

+ 9.8 

N 

MINNESOTA MNG & MFG CO 

75 

50 

73.88 

+ 1.6 

+ 2.2 

A 

MSI DATA CORP 

19 

10 

19.00 

+ 1.0 

+5.6 

Q 

PRIAM CORP 

6 

2 

3.38 

-0.1 

-3.6 

Q 

PRINTRONIX INC 

14 

10 

10.50 

-0.8 

-6.7 

N 

QMS INC 

22 

11 

18.25 

-0.8 

-3.9 

Q 

QUANTUM CORP 

35 

15 

17.00 

+0.0 

+ 0.0 

Q 

RAMTEKCORP 

6 

4 

5.56 

+0.6 

+ 11.3 

N 

RECOGNITION EQUIP INC 

27 

11 

19.00 

+0.4 

+ 2.0 

Q 

REXON INC 

14 

5 

9.38 

+0.1 

+ 1.4 

Q 

SCAN TRONCORP 

17 

11 

12.75 

+0.3 

+ 2.0 

Q 

SEAGATE TECHNOLOGY 

46 

11 

30.13 

+ 3.1 

+ 11.6 

N 

STORAGE TECH CORP 

5 

2 

3.38 

-0.3 

-6.9 

Q 

TANDON CORP 

7 

2 

4.50 

-0.4 

-7.7 

A 

TEC INC 

7 

3 

5.00 

-0.3 

-4.8 

N 

TEKTRONIX INC 

43 

28 

38.75 

+ 1.3 

+ 3.3 

Q 

TELEVIDEO SYS INC 

3 

2 

2.56 

+0.2 

+ 7.9 

N 

TELEX CORP 

102 

53 

64.63 

-0.4 

-0.6 

Q 

WYSETECH 

35 

13 

30.88 

-0.5 

-1.6 

N 

XEROX CORP 

81 

51 

73.25 

-1.3 

-1.7 

0 

XIDEX CORP 

20 

11 

13.25 

+ 0.4 

+2.9 


Leasing Companies 


N 

COMDISCO INC 

33 

15 

28.25 

-1.3 

-4.2 

N 

CONTINENTAL INFO SYS 

14 

7 

12.13 

+ 1.6 

+ 15.5 

Q 

PHOENIX AMERN INC 

8 

3 

4.50 

+ 0.3 

+ 5.9 

Q 

SELECTERM INC 

7 

5 

5.63 

+ 0.0 

+0.0 

N 

US LEASING INTL 

53 

39 

53.00 

+ 0.4 

+0.7 


EXCH: N-NEW YORK; A = AMERICAN; Q = NATIONAL; 
O-OVER-THE-COUNTER; S=SPLIT 

O-T-C PRICES ARE BID PRICES AS OF 3 P.M. OR LAST BID 
(I)TONEAREST DOLLAR 


Join the party 


Tech issues push aside months 
of disfavor, host market rally 

Two weeks ago, computer industry stocks 
missed the stock market’s party of rising 
prices. Last week, they hosted it. 

After a couple of months of disfavor, tech¬ 
nology issues roared back into investors’ 
portfolios, leading a market rally that pro¬ 
pelled the Dow Jones industrial average up 
more than 27 points Thursday and sparked 
other market indicators to record levels as 
well. 

Seven of the New York Stock Exchange’s 
15 most active stocks on Thursday were 
computer-related, and all were gainers. Star 
performers included the following: Tandem 
Computers, Inc., up 2 points to 29%; Hew¬ 
lett-Packard Co., up 2% points to 65; and 
IBM, up 378 points to 163. 

Two less active stocks gained more than 
8% in value. Computervision Corp. rose 1!4 
points to 15%, and Advanced Micro Devices, 
Inc. went up IV 2 points to 19%. 

Six technology issues on the Big Board hit 
their highs for the year on Thursday: Com¬ 
paq Computer Corp. at 50%; AT&T at 33V2; 
Unisys Corp. at 44%, its highest since a re¬ 
cent stock split; Uccel Corp. at 45; Anacomp, 
Inc. at 10%; and Contel Corp. at 37%. 

CLINTON WILDER 


AUGUST 10,1987 


92 


COMPUTERWORLD 
































































































































































































NEWS 


ADR greases DBMS’s wheels 

Claims up to 35% performance gain in new release ofDatacom/DB 


BY CHARLES BABCOCK 

CW STAFF 


PRINCETON, N.J. — Applied 
Data Research, Inc. (ADR) last 
week announced a performance- 
oriented release of Data- 
com/DB, its relational-like data 
base management system, that 
it says is 25% to 35% more effi¬ 
cient in transaction processing 
than its predecessor. 

In addition to performance 
improvements. Release 7.5 of 


the DBMS incorporates a 31-bit 
addressing mode so it can take 
advantage of the facilities of 
IBM’s MVS/XA operating sys¬ 
tem. Release 7.5 operates above 
the 16M-byte line that con¬ 
strains regular IBM MVS/SP us¬ 
ers, and it takes advantage of the 
larger virtual memory above the 
line. The DBMS also frees up 
Common Storage Area memory, 
for which there is frequently 
contention in busy shops relying 
heavily on older, 24-bit applica¬ 


tions running below the 16M- 
byte line. 

Besides increasing transac¬ 
tion throughput, ADR spokes¬ 
men claimed, this release of Da- 
tacom/DB is able to trim CICS 
response time by 25% to 35% 
and cut CPU utilization by 10% 
to 15%. 

The performance improve¬ 
ments stem from a faster set-se¬ 
lection optimizer that uses a pro¬ 
prietary statistical estimation 
technique to select access paths 


and automatically stay abreast of 
changes in data patterns and 
keys. The optimizer is rule- 
based and can make trade-off de¬ 
cisions on access paths when it 
encounters complex queries, 
ADR spokesmen said. 

Delegates work load 

Datacom/DB is capable of dis¬ 
tributing the I/O work load 
across multiple processors, al¬ 
lowing it to exploit dyadic and 
quadratic processors for greater 
system throughput, ADR 
spokesmen said. 

Release 7.5 is available imme¬ 
diately. It carries a price tag of 
$145,900 for IBM OS and MVS 
environments and $114,500 for 


DEC prices 

FROM PAGE 1 


Users edgy over VAX price rise 


D igital Equipment Corp. customers 
were receptive last week to the price 
reductions on the lower end of the 
VAX line but stressed that they need 
more information about the price in¬ 
creases enacted on many of DEC’s other prod¬ 
ucts. 

“I would have expected [the price cuts], 
since the Microvax III is coming out,” said 
Larry Johnson, manager of MIS at Interlake in 
Burr Ridge, Ill. Regarding the price increases of 
up to 5% on most other DEC equipment, John¬ 
son said, “I’m going to have a long, serious talk 
with my DEC rep.” He said he was leaning to¬ 
ward Fujitsu, Ltd. disk drives on the five or six 
VAX 8250 and 8350 systems he might buy. 

“As long as they keep dropping the prices in 
that low-end range, it suits us fine,” commented 
Richard Baldwin, director of data processing at 
the Alabama River Pulp Co. in Perdue Hill, Ala. 
Last week, Baldwin received an 8250 system 
and said he is looking forward to the announce¬ 


ment in the near future of the VAX 8400. 

Another manager, who is in the process of 
purchasing several Microvax 2000 models, said 
the 17% to 20% price reductions on those ma¬ 
chines were most welcome. Steven C. Sneider, 
who heads computer model development at Ba- 
telle Memorial Institute in Willowbrook, Ill., 
also greeted favorably the ability of 8000 series 
systems to attach directly to a local-area Vax- 
cluster, which he said will save him the $13,000 
cost of a Unibus channel he would otherwise 
have needed. 

However, Sneider was less pleased with 
DEC’s price increases. “I think their software is 
too expensive as it is,” he said. 

Donald Kelch, an applications analyst at a 
Caterpillar, Inc. facility in Pbntiac, Ill., said the 
throughput increase made possible by DEC’s 
new lM-bit chip memory technology is good 
news because he will be using his VAX in a 
memory-intensive graphics application. 

DAVID BRIGHT and STANLEY GIBSON 


Ashton-Tate tests publishing waters 


BY STEPHENJONES 

CW STAFF 


Ashton-Tate moved to carve out 
a niche for itself in the desktop 
publishing market last week, in¬ 
troducing a $295 package de¬ 
signed for professionals with lim¬ 
ited needs in that area. 

The Byline package is posi¬ 
tioned as a kind of workingman’s 
desktop publishing program that 
does not require the high-perfor¬ 
mance hardware associated with 
such pricey software as Aldus 
Corp.’s Pagemaker. 

Byline is aimed at what Ash¬ 
ton-Tate called an untapped 
market of word processor users 
who want fancier output but do 
not need sophisticated publish- 
, ing skills. “We’re planting a flag 
in a market that has great oppor¬ 
tunities for big volume success,” 
said Ashton-Tate product man¬ 
ager Bill Jordan. 

Byline, which is Ashton¬ 
Tate’s first desktop publishing 
offering, is scheduled to ship to 
authorized Ashton-Tate dealers 
this quarter. Jordan said preview 

AUGUST 10,1987 


copies of the product will go out 
to about 160 Ashton-Tate cus¬ 
tomers this week. 

Targets occasional users 

The package is the latest in a se¬ 
ries of low-end desktop publish¬ 
ing systems that are aimed at the 
pocketbooks of occasional desk¬ 
top publishing users. Byline will 
fit in between Software Publish¬ 
ing Corp.’s PFS First Publisher, 
which sells for $99, and Digital 
Research, Inc.’s GEM Desk 
Publisher, which costs $395. 

Designed to run on IBM Per¬ 
sonal Computers and compati¬ 
bles with 384K bytes of random- 
access memory (RAM), Byline 
uses low-level monochrome 
graphics capabilities and does 
not need a mouse. Most high-end 
desktop publishing systems, in 
contrast, require high-resolution 
color graphics, a mouse and at 
least 512 K bytes of RAM. 

Craig Cline, associate editor 
of the Seybold Report on Desktop 
Publishing in Malibu, Calif., 
said Byline is the first product of 
its kind to provide a data base 


publishing capability. The fea¬ 
ture allows users to import Ash- 
ton-Tate’s Dbase III Plus data 
bases into prestyled forms. 

Byline also directly imports 
and exports files created by such 
word processor programs as 
Ashton-Tate's Multimate, 
WordPerfect Corp.’s WordPer¬ 
fect and Micropro International 
Corp.’s Wordstar. It also imports 
files from Lotus Development 
Corp.’s 1-2-3 and Symphony. 

Lacks friendliness factor 

Cline said the package’s weak 
point is that occasional users 
may not find it to be as user- 
friendly as other low-end pro¬ 
grams. 

Once a user develops the 
skills to master the product, 
Cline said Byline might not offer 
enough capabilities. 

“Although it’s not as difficult 
[to operate] as high-end prod¬ 
ucts, Byline is still difficult 
enough to use that when people 
get up to speed on it, they’ll 
reach a wall of limitation and get 
frustrated,” he said. 


crease system capacity and 
throughput, the ability to direct¬ 
ly connect to local-area Vaxclus- 
ters and the ability to support up 
to four Ethernet connections. 
DEC also halved the footprint of 
8530 and 8550 systems config¬ 
ured for Vaxclusters. 

IBM’s spasms 

The restructuring is “not atypi¬ 
cal, because IBM is going 
through the same spasms right 
now — a constant rebalancing of 
the price/performance levels at 
each point of the systems line,” 
said Stephen Dube, an analyst at 
Shearson Lehman Brothers, Inc. 

By being more aggressive at 
the low end, DEC is “creating in 
its own mind a position for a fol¬ 
low-on Microvax product,” not¬ 
ed Infocorp analyst Sandra Gant. 

The Microvax III is expected 
to offer at least double the per¬ 
formance of the Microvax II, 
which operates at about 0.9 mil¬ 
lion instructions per second (see 
story page 51). The system will 
differ from the larger, VAXBI- 
bus-based 8000 series machines 
in that it will retain the slower Q- 
bus. 

The steepest increase was 
made on the 8550 system, which 
moved to $506,000 from 
$479,000 for a basic 32M-byte 
configuration. Prior to the 
March price restructuring, the 
price of the same configuration 
had been approximately 
$398,000. 

The price of the VAX 8700, 
DEC’s most powerful single-pro¬ 
cessor system, rose from 
$564,000 to $592,000 for a 
48M-byte configuration, and the 
price of a dual-processor 8800 
system with 64M bytes rose 
from $852,000 to $885,000. 

Leading the VAX 8000 price 
reductions was the 8350, which 
dropped from $132,000 to 
$124,000 for a 32M-byte build¬ 
ing block system. In March, DEC 
had reduced the 8350’s price by 
as much as $19,000. The price of 
a 32M-byte 8530 system fell 
from $342,000 to $331,000, 
and the 8250 dropped from 


DOS environments. 

In addition, the Princeton- 
based mainframe software house 
last week announced added func¬ 
tionality in Release 2.4 of its Da- 
tadictionary. The upgraded 
package is said to allow dynamic 
cataloging to support data base 
prototyping with change control 
of rapidly executed versions. It 
also allows multiple test, produc¬ 
tion and history versions of data 
base definitions to be estab¬ 
lished, tested, used, archived 
and refreshed with integrity. 

Datadictionary Release 2.4 is 
available immediately and priced 
at $39,600 for OS and MVS ver¬ 
sions and $32,600 for DOS ver¬ 
sions. 


$96,000 to $92,000 for a 16M- 
byte configuration. 

“None of the changes were 
very big,” said Mark Roberts, 
corporate product operations 
manager at DEC. “What we did 
was just move some of the stuff 
around to make the line more 
consistent. We made the low end 
of the 8000 series a bit more 
competitive and enabled it to be 
expanded with more memory, 
which will make a lot of differ¬ 
ence. The 16M-byte memories 
for the 8250 and the 8350 will 
give people a lot of performance. 
The larger systems being able to 
use a 64M-byte memory board 
will have a tremendous impact.” 

A marketing move? 

Analysts noted that the changing 
of retail pricing is often no more 
than a marketing move and may 
not mean that much to large cor¬ 
porations that buy in volume. 
“The public announcement of 
price changes is really a market¬ 
ing statement, as opposed to a 
real-world situation,” Dube said. 

Because DEC recently made 
software eligible for the compa¬ 
ny’s standard discounts, most 
price increases on software 
would be negated, Roberts 
claimed. He said the only other 
products not impacted by the 
price hikes are the Vaxstation 
workstations and some recently 
announced servers. 

However, DEC did not pro¬ 
vide pricing information by press 
time on such products as disk 
drives, terminals and printers. 
John Rose, head of DEC’s per¬ 
sonal computing group, said he 
did not know of any price 
changes on the Vaxmate person¬ 
al computer. 

DEC claimed that use of the 
new surface-mount memory 
modules can increase system 
throughput by as much as 40%. 
The 16M-byte module expands 
the capacity of the 8250 and 
8350 from 32M to 128M bytes, 
and the 64M-byte module dou¬ 
bles the capacity of the 8530, 
8550,8700 and 8800 systems to 
256M bytes. Adding 64M bytes 
of memory now costs a customer 
$25,000, compared with 
$36,000 previously, Roberts 
said. 


COMPUTERWORLD 


93 

















NEWS 


Software firms claim 
HP switch poses no risk 


BY JEFFRY BEELER 

CW STAFF 


CUPERTINO, Calif. — Two 
suppliers of system utilities for 
the Hewlett-Packard Co. 3000 
series said last week they have 
been able to convert their prod¬ 
ucts to run on HP’s commercial 
Precision Architecture proces¬ 
sors with a minimum of code re¬ 
visions. 

Unison Software, Inc. in near¬ 
by Mountain View, Calif., and 
Los Angeles-based Vesoft, Inc. 
recounted their recent visits to 
HP’s Software Evaluation and 
Migration Center (SEMC) here, 
where the companies successful¬ 
ly moved their packages to the 
machines. 

When the HP 3000/930 and 
3000/950 were announced in 
February 1986, much of the in¬ 
dustry voiced serious doubts 
about whether such radical de¬ 


partures from conventional ar¬ 
chitectures could remain com¬ 
patible with the rest of the 
company’s minicomputers. 

During a series of eight to 10 
SEMC visits from May 1986 to 
last month, however, Unison 
successfully migrated four pack¬ 
ages, totaling some 160,000 
lines of code, according to Mi¬ 
chael Casteel, Unison executive 
vice-president. 

One of Unison’s software 
products, a library package 
called Tapes, was ported to na¬ 
tive mode, which allows the code 
to take full advantage of Preci¬ 
sion Architecture’s enhanced 
functions. 

Two other utilities — a re¬ 
sponse-time measurement aid 
and a transaction processor — 
were moved to compatibility 
mode, which enables 3000-se¬ 
ries programs to execute on the 
930 and 950 without exploiting 


their expanded performance fea¬ 
tures. The fourth package, a 
batch job scheduler named Mae¬ 
stro, was split between compati¬ 
bility and native modes. 

In Tapes’ case, the migration 
entailed little more than restor¬ 
ing the code to tape and recom¬ 
piling it to run under Precision 
Architecture. Less than 1% of 
the package’s 10,000 to 15,000 
lines of source code had to be 
changed. 

With Maestro, about three- 
fourths of its code, which was 
written in HP’s proprietary SPL 
programming language, was 
simply restored and migrated to 
compatibility mode. 

Like the bulk of Maestro and 
some of Unison’s other prod¬ 
ucts, Vesoft’s MPEX/3000 pro¬ 
ductivity tool and Security/3000 
utility were also written in SPL. 

But even though the two soft¬ 
ware offerings were migrated 
only as far as compatibility 
mode, the company still felt the 
need to rewrite 2% to 3% of its 
30,000 lines of code because of 
operating system-specific opera¬ 
tions, according to Vesoft Vice- 
President Eugene Volokh. 


Cincom President Yablonsky resigns 


CINCINNATI — Cincom Sys¬ 
tems, Inc. announced last week 
that company President Dennis 
Yablonsky, who has been with 
Cincom for 12 years, has re¬ 
signed for personal reasons. 
Stepping back into the presi¬ 
dent’s role will be Cincom 
founder and Chairman Thomas 
Nies, who had previously held 
the title. 

“It is necessary for Dennis to 
relocate back to Pittsburgh, his 
hometown, to be close to his par¬ 
ents and family,” Nies said in a 


prepared statement. 

However, Yablonsky, 35, said 
he is leaving for a better position 
as president of the Carnegie 
Group, Inc., a $13 million artifi¬ 
cial intelligence consulting firm. 
Carnegie employs 150 people. 

“I will be responsible for all 
the strategic aspects of the com¬ 
pany. I’ll be the head coach now, 
and at Cincom, that wasn’t possi¬ 
ble,” he said last week. Yab¬ 
lonsky will also own stock in the 
privately held Carnegie Group. 

During the past two years, 


Yablonsky had emerged at Cin¬ 
com as a strong spokesman for 
the company. 

Yablonsky became president 
after emerging from marketing 
positions at the company. In ad¬ 
dition, he oversaw the compa¬ 
ny’s growth from $89 million in 
1985 to a projected $120 million 
this year. 

He was a key player in the 
firm’s replacement of its aging 
Total data base management 
system with the relational Supra 
in the IBM mainframe world. 


Mac attack 

FROM PAGE 16 

As a user of DEC and Apple 
equipment, Rodger Mansfield 
said he found Helix VMX an ideal 
departmental data base environ¬ 
ment. Mansfield, a senior man¬ 
agement systems analyst for the 
Valley Systems Division of Gen¬ 
eral Dynamics Corp. said he used 


Helix on a Macintosh to develop 
a complex application in one 
weekend. Now he is implement¬ 
ing Helix VMX on a Microvax. 

“We could have just used He¬ 
lix for that project and gone on to 
a mainframe application, but 
when we saw it would solve a lot 
of our networking problems, we 
kept the Helix product,” he said. 
Mansfield said he believes the 
DEC backing will make users 


more comfortable with the Helix 
product. 

Another user agreed. “We 
had always been sold on the user 
interface of the Mac and decided 
to apply it to data bases. The 
VAX came into play as we 
charted out our growth curve 
because the VAX is easy to up¬ 
grade,” said John Damico, gen¬ 
eral manager of Public Enter¬ 
prises, Inc. in Rochester, N.Y. 


Second-class postage paid at Framingham, Mass., and additional mailing offices. 

Computerworld (ISSN-0010-4841) is published weekly, except: January (5 issues), February (5 issues), March (6 
issues), April (5 issues), May (5 issues), June (6 issues), July (5 issues), August (6 issues), September (5 issues), October 
(5 issues), November (6 issues), December (4 issues) and a single combined issue for the last week in December and the 
first week in January by CW Publishing/Inc., 375 Cochituate Road, Box 9171, Framingham, Mass. 01701-9171. 
Copyright 1987 by CW Publishing/Inc. All rights reserved. 

Computerworld can be purchased on 35 mm microfilm through University Microfilm Int. Periodical Entry Dept., 300 
Zeeb Road, Ann Arbor, Mich. 48106. Computerworld is indexed: write to Circulation Dept, for subscription information. 
Photocopy rights: permission to photocopy for internal or personal use or the internal or personal use of specific clients is 
granted by CW Publishing/Inc. for libraries and other users registered with the Copyright Clearance Center (CCC), 
provided that the base fee of $3.00 per copy of the article, plus $.50 per page is paid directly to Copyright Clearance 
Center, 21 Congress Street, Salem, Mass. 01970. 

Permission to photocopy does not extend to contributed articles followed by this symbol, t 
Special requests for reprints and permission should be addressed to Nancy M. Shannon, CW Publishing/Inc., 375 
Cochituate Road, Box 9171, Framingham, Mass. 01701-9171. Subscriptions call toll free (800) 255-6286 or in New 
Jersey call (800) 322-6286. 

Subscription rates: $2.00 a copy: U.S. — $44 a year; Canada, Central & So. America — $110 a year; Europe — $165 a 
year; all other countries — $245 a year (airmail service). Four weeks notice is required for change of address. Allow six 
weeks for new subscription service to begin. 

Mil ABP 

POSTMASTER: Send Form 3579 (Change of Address) to Computerworld, Circulation Department, P.O. 
Box 1566, Neptune, NJ 07754-1566. 



INSIDE LINES 


Keep on keeping me waitin’. Don’t count on IBM to 
rush its introductory version of MVS — MVS/IS. IBM ex¬ 
ecutives reportedly told analysts at a recent gathering in 
Dallas that MVS/IS will be available in 1990. The prepack¬ 
aging is being coordinated by IBM groups in Poughkeepsie, 
N.Y., and Boblingen, West Germany. 

This ever happen with Mitch in charge? Users of Lo¬ 
tus’s 1-2-3 Release 2.0 are still waiting for Learn and 
Speedup, two add-in enhancements for which a March deliv¬ 
ery was promised. Sources at Lotus said the company’s soft¬ 
ware developers are having trouble writing the Speedup re¬ 
calculation feature because it taps directly into the actual 
code of 1-2-3. Meanwhile, Learn is ready and waiting for 
Speedup to live up to its name. Anybody out there still wait¬ 
ing for Networker? 

The short and the long of it. Novell Netware users can 
expect shipment of Version 2.1 next month, and our friend¬ 
ly users group tells us OS/2 support will follow by year’s 
end. But (there’s always a but), Novell has confirmed re¬ 
ports that shipment of two gateway products, X.25 and the 
Netware Asynchronous Communications Service, an¬ 
nounced at Comdex/Spring ’87, will be delayed. No explana¬ 
tion was available. 

As the world turns. Joint marketing agreements be¬ 
tween minisupercomputer and technical workstation ven¬ 
dors have become quite commonplace of late. The most re¬ 
cent, expected to be disclosed at a New York press briefing 
today, pairs fledgling minisupercomputer maker Multiflow 
Computer, Inc. with Apollo. Apollo is an investor in Multi¬ 
flow but also has a joint marketing relationship with another 
minisuper vendor, Alliant. Alliant, meanwhile, has a rela¬ 
tionship with Sun. 

Trading places. IBM has shifted responsibility for the de¬ 
velopment of its RT PC 32-bit Unix processor from the In¬ 
dustry Systems Products Group to the Entry Systems Divi¬ 
sion in Boca Raton, Fla. “This will provide a single 
development focus on technical and intelligent worksta¬ 
tions,” an IBM spokeswoman said last week. It also means 
that the RT PC will be refocused to reach a broader market. 
“We are targeting the Unix marketplace,” said Merry 
Quackenbush, director of media industry and publishing sys¬ 
tems. 

It’s a small world after all. Hewlett-Packard is report¬ 
edly preparing to release two microcomputers this fall 
based on the Intel 80286 and 80386 chips. The desktop ma¬ 
chines supposedly offer the option to have both a 5 Vi- and a 
3V2-in. floppy disk drive built in. A lot of users have been 
grumbling about the conversion process since IBM released 
its PS/2 series with microfloppy drives. 

Reaching for the top. Pansophic wants executives to be 
able to query its Easytrieve Plus data bases as easily as pro¬ 
grammers do. To that end, the Oak Brook, Ill., firm is plan¬ 
ning to announce this fall a natural language interface to the 
company’s Easytrieve Plus data retrieval system. Easy¬ 
trieve Plus NL “will be an English-language product that 
creates mainframe queries from a personal computer,” said 
Joan Fee, manager of Pansophic’s Personal Computer Prod¬ 
ucts group. 

Best of the batch. Software Publishing will usher in a 
new wave of desktop publishing with the release of a pack¬ 
age that includes a built-in full-featured word processor. 
Other desktop publishing packages require word processor 
files to be imported, often through MS-DOS batch files that 
befuddle novice users. 

OK, just one more late notice. Apple has been forced to 
revise delivery dates of A/UX, a version of Unix compatible 
with AT&T Unix System V and the University of California 
at Berkeley Unix 4.2. Co-developed by Unisoft and Apple, 
A/UX has been tripped up by performance problems and 
won’t meet its July schedule, sources say. Unisoft delivered 
the basic product to Apple, which has been trying to graft its 
icon-based user interface to A/UX. 


94 


COMPUTERWORLD 


AUGUST 10,1987 



















MORE THAN JUST 
THE BASIC NECESSITIES. 



The Most Installed 

Online Data Entry 

System Worldwide 


Speed. Power. Performance. These are the 
Formula I qualities that put KEYFAST, the CICS 
Data Entry System, miles ahead of the rest. For fast, 
accurate data entry and processing, our customers 
know that KEYFAST can’t be beaten. Just take a 
look at this winning formula: 1. Ease of use: any 
user can paint complex formats and entry rules 
online. Menus, Help Screens with notepads, and 
messages guide the user. KEYFAST is easy to 
install and can be used immediately. 2. Powerful 
entry/processing routines: automatic field duplica¬ 
tion, shorthand, totals and mathematical functions 
for data management; extensive batch processing; 
data extract on any storage media; select, duplicate, 
modify, extend or reformat records. 3. Flexible 
verify and checking functions: alphanumeric, 
numeric, binary, packed and entry/verify fields, 
range checks, table lookup; search, mass 
change, select, merge, copy and sort functions. 
4. Powerful and time-saving features: the Data 
Dictionary makes many user exits unnecessary. 
The LANGUAGE, H&M’s end user program¬ 
ming language, enables users to define special field 
validations. 5. Security at its best: for applications, 
tasks, functions and batches. 


r* 


Mail For More Information 


Name 


Company 


mnv 

SOFTWARE’S FUTURE 

H&M Systems Software, Inc., 25 E. Spring Valley Avenue 
Maywood, N.J. 07607-9982, Phone: 1-(201) 845-3357 
TOLL FREE: l-(800) FOR DEMO 


Department 


Phone 


Street 


City, State, Zip 


| CPU Op.System 

I H&M Systems Software, Inc., 25 E. Spring Valiev Ave. 
J_ Maywood, N.J. 07607-9982, Phone: 1-(201) 845-3357 









































EIGHT YEARS AGO, WE 
S/W THAT THEIR POTENTIAL 
WAS ANYTHING BUT MINI. 


Today everyone’s on the minicomputer 
bandwagon. But the mini wasn’t always 
fashionable. 

Eight years ago, we were a lonely voice 
in the crowd. Quietly developing the finan¬ 
cial software, service and support for the 
day when minicomputers would become a 
major force in the corporate flow of business 
information. 

Now that day is here. It seems like it hap¬ 
pened almost overnight. 

But for the benefit of those minicompu¬ 


ter users who are presently evaluating soft¬ 
ware vendors, we’d like to point out a few 
things that didn’t happen overnight. 

Good things people automatically enjoy 
when they do business with McCormack 
& Dodge. 

Our minicomputer products have stood 
the test of time. All over the world, they’ve 
shown they can deliver the same outstand¬ 
ing results as M&JD mainframe software. 

What’s more, our systems are supported 
worldwide by top minicomputer profes- 

M c Cormack& Dodge 

a company of 

The Dun & Bradstreet Corporation 


sionals-seasoned application, technical, 
and training specialists. 

And good as our products are, they 
perpetually get better. Enhancements flow 
regularly from a long-established R&.D 
program, generously funded through Dun 
& Bradstreet resources. 

With all the good hardware available, 
choosing your brand of minicomputer may 
be difficult. 

Fortunately, your software choice is a 
whole lot easier. 


■i 






Financial, human resource, manufacturing, and application development software for multiple computing environments. Call 1-800-343-0325. 


©1987